page title icon 201: Steve Farber: I couldn’t bear the moral dilemma that I had

Steve Farber Show Notes Page

Steve Farber had a moral dilemma with the business that he owned. So, he got out. But he had nothing to go to. Eventually, he flipped his radical leap into a 30-year career of helping leaders to move onward and upward faster.

Steve Farber was born and raised in suburban Chicago, otherwise known as “Chicagoland.”

His mother died when he was 8 years old, and he was raised mostly by his father, who never re-married. He was the youngest of three. Since his sister and brother were 7 and 9 years older, he started out as the baby, but by the time he got to middle school he was, in effect, an only child, living with his dad and spending a lot of time fending for himself and hanging out with friends. At 23, he started his own family and his own business.

Steve’s independent, self-reliant childhood combined with a community of deep, lifelong friendships, cultivated in him an entrepreneurial spirit and a deep interest in the dynamics of social, material and psychological success.

Steve’s first entrepreneurial venture was in the commodities futures arena where he learned how to lead, sell, market, and operate a business. He also learned that—even though he loved business—he hated that business. So, he shut it down and pursued his burgeoning passion for authentic, inspiring leadership, which, over the course of many years, ultimately led him to develop his own body of work, which is represented in 3 bestselling books.

His most recent book, Greater Than Yourself: The Ultimate Lesson of True Leadership details the steps needed for each of the three GTY pillars – Expand yourself, give yourself and replicate yourself.

Steve’s career as a family guy has given him a daughter, 2 sons, 3 stepdaughters and the dubious distinction of being a man who raised teenagers for 25 straight years. He is still waiting for the medal.

Now an exuberant empty-nester, he lives with his wife, Veronica, in the Little Italy neighborhood of San Diego in a condo overlooking the San Diego bay.

Tweetable Quotes and Mentions

Listen to @stevefarber to get over the hump on the @FastLeaderShow – Click to Tweet

“Love is a powerful business principle.” – Click to Tweet

“Love is at the foundation of what great leadership is.” – Click to Tweet

“Love is just damn good business, if we do it right.” – Click to Tweet

“As business leaders and organizations, we need our customers to love us.” – Click to Tweet

“If someone is just satisfied with us, there’s no loyalty.” – Click to Tweet

“The only way I can create a culture that people love working in is if I love it and them, myself, first.” – Click to Tweet

“If you want a competitive advantage, it’s all traced back to our own hearts.” – Click to Tweet

“One of the main things that holds us back is that we tend to think of business as a zero-sum game.” – Click to Tweet

“My greatest opportunities will come from my ability to help you find your greatest opportunities.” – Click to Tweet

“My greatest success will come from the degree to which I’m able to help you achieve your success.” – Click to Tweet

“The most successful people are the ones that tend to make other people more successful.” – Click to Tweet

“If we can change the experience of what it means to go to work, we can change the world.” – Click to Tweet

“The greatest leaders never focus the attention on their own greatness.” – Click to Tweet

“The greatest leader become the greatest leaders by making others greater than themselves.” – Click to Tweet

“So, you want to know how to become the greatest leader around? Make others greater than you.” – Click to Tweet

“There are people that have no interest in growing; you can’t choose for somebody else.” – Click to Tweet

“You can’t become a better leader simply because you think you’re supposed to; you have to want to.” – Click to Tweet

“If the only reason you can think of to not do something is because the idea scares you, then that’s the reason to do it.” – Click to Tweet

“If you get negative feedback, even if you don’t believe it’s true, assume that they’re right and go from there.” – Click to Tweet

[optin-cat id=11101]

Hump to Get Over

Steve Farber had a moral dilemma with the business that he owned. So, he got out. But he had nothing to go to. Eventually, he flipped his radical leap into a 30-year career of helping leaders to move onward and upward faster.

Advice for others

Just start writing your experience for other people to read.

Holding him back from being an even better leader

Taking on too many projects all at once and a lot of things fall through the cracks.

Best Leadership Advice

If you get negative feedback, even if you don’t believe it’s true, assume that they’re right and go from there.

Secret to Success

I love people.

Best tools in business or life

My ability to communicate in various media.

Recommended Reading

Greater Than Yourself: The Ultimate Lesson of True Leadership

The Radical Leap: A Personal Lesson in Extreme Leadership

The Radical Edge: Another Personal Lesson in Extreme Leadership

Leading Out Loud: Inspiring Change Through Authentic Communications, New and Revised

The Leadership Challenge: How to Make Extraordinary Things Happen in Organizations (J-B Leadership Challenge: Kouzes/Posner)

Contacting Steve Farber

Email: steve [at] stevefarber.com

Website: https://www.stevefarber.com/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/stevefarber

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/stevefarber/

Resources and Show Mentions

Call Center Coach

How Leaders Can Best Lead Leaders

Show Transcript:

Click to access edited transcript

201: Steve Farber: I couldn’t bear the moral dilemma that I had

 

Intro: Welcome to the Fast Leader podcast, where we explore convenient yet effective shortcuts that will help you get ahead and move forward faster by becoming a better leader. And now here’s your host, customer and employee engagement expert and certified emotional intelligence practitioner, Jim Rembach.

 

Call center coach develops and unites the next generation of call center leaders. Through our e-learning and community individuals gain knowledge and skills in the six core competencies that is the blueprint that develops high-performing call center leaders. Successful supervisors do not just happen so go to callcentercoach.com to learn more about enrollment and download your copy of the Supervisor Success Path e-book now.

 

Jim Rembach:     Okay Fast Leader legion, today I’m excited because we’re going to go a little bit deeper than typically we go into in regards to the important Golden Rule. Steve Farber was born and raised in suburban Chicago, otherwise known as Chicagoland and I’m very familiar with that. His mother died when he was 8 years old and he was raised mostly by his father who never remarry. He was the youngest of three. Since his sisters and brother were 7 and 9 years older he started out as the baby but by the time he got to middle school he was in effect an only child living with his dad and spending a lot of time fending for himself and hanging out with friends. At 23, he started his own family and his own business. Steve’s independent, self-reliant, childhood combined with a community of deep lifelong friendships cultivated in him an entrepreneurial spirit and a deep interest in the dynamics of social, material and psychological success. 

 

Steve’s first entrepreneurial venture was in the commodities futures arena where he learned how to lead, sell, market and operate a business. He also learned that even though he loved business he hated that business so he shut it down and pursued his burgeoning passion for authentic inspiring leadership which over the course of many years ultimately led him to develop his own body of work which is represented in three best-selling books. His most recent book, Greater than Yourself the ultimate lesson of true leadership details the steps needed for each of the three GTY pillars—expand yourself, give  yourself and replicate yourself. Steve’s career as a family guy has given him a daughter, two sons, three stepdaughters and the dubious distinction of being a man who raised teenagers for 25 straight years he’s still waiting for the medal. Now an exuberant empty-nester, he lives with his wife Veronica in the Little Italy neighborhood of San Diego in a condo overlooking San Diego Bay.  Steve Farber, are you ready to help us get over the hump?

 

Steve Farber:      I’m looking at San Diego Bay right there. 

 

Jim Rembach:     Yeah, you don’t have to rub that Steve. 

 

Steve Farber:      Yeah, yeah, but I enjoy it so much thank you Jim, it’s great to be here with you.

 

Jim Rembach:     Good. Now given my legion a little bit about you but can you tell us what your current passion is so that we can get to know you even better?

 

Steve Farber:      Yeah, as I’ve been in the business of leadership development now for 30 years and really at the core of everything that I’ve found and everything that I’ve learned and pretty much everything I teach through my keynotes and my books and my company which is called The Extreme Leadership Institute is really, and I say this as a business guy, love is a powerful business principle. Love is really at the foundation of what great leadership is and love is just damn good business if we do it right. So that’s what I’m passionate about is getting that message out and helping leaders and businesses to apply that in the way that they do business. 

 

Jim Rembach:     Thank you for sharing that. The words that you’re using and the framework and the context and all of that for me I start thinking about this whole generational type of management and leadership that we have to do and so how I hear so much about the older generation talking about those darn kids and that’s going on for generation. 

 

Steve Farber:      Of course it is. 

 

Jim Rembach:     When you start talking about bringing this type of mindset, concepts, bringing those emotions into the workplace what kind of resistance do you find with those old folks?

 

Steve Farber:      Surprisingly little. Let me let me explain that a little bit because the knee-jerk reaction is to resist it’s to dismiss the idea of love in business as California touchy-feely hoo-hah crap as that soft squishy kumbaya stuff. But if you delve a little bit deeper into it, and I make the case for it in this way, it’s really hard to argue with it. Here’s the argument, if argument is the right word, business people as business people his company is his organizations as leaders we need our customers to love us to love our product or service for the very simple reason that anything short of that does not produce the kind of results that we want. If somebody’s just satisfied with us there’s no loyalty there’s no greater likelihood they’re going to stick around or continue to do business with us or talk about us to other people. When they love us and the emotional connection happens that’s where the payoff comes from as business people.

 

So if we start with that then it’s just a matter of breaking it down. The only way to create that kind of experience for customers and a meaningful and sustainable way over time is to create a culture that people love working in. And the only way that I can create a culture that people love working in is if I love it and them myself first. So, if you want a competitive advantage from your customer’s relationship with you it all gets traced back down to our own hearts. 

 

So when I lay it out that way it’s like, okay, that makes sense but now what do we do with that? So what does that look like and how do we practice it that becomes the challenge that where the work is. So the resistance is there at first but it’s easy to dissipate and then it’s about understanding that this isn’t about group hugs on the elevator this is about weaving this idea into every aspect of the way that we do business including the way that we relate to and help one another in the work environment and beyond and that’s where s what I really delve into in my book called, Greater than Yourself.

 

Jim Rembach:     Okay, I appreciate your doing that because that does make sense and I can see that would absolutely bring down the walls of resistance. In addition, when you were talking I started really thinking about the word abundance. Meaning that you’re coming from a place of abundance more so than scarcity and that if we abundantly have and share and communicate and convey those types of feelings of caring and respect and honor and all that yes, therefore it just bleeds over. 

 

Steve Farber:      Yes, exactly. I think you put your finger on—one of the main things that holds us back is that we tend to think of—life in general for a lot of people but business in particular we tend to think of it as a zero-sum game. In other words my success in business is somehow predicated on your not being as successful as I am or maybe even on your failure because there’s only one place at the top and that is a scarcity mindset. The abundance mindset, and this is not metaphysics it has an impact on the way that we behave, the idea that there’s an opportunity for all of us and that really in fact my greatest opportunities will come from my ability to help you find your greatest opportunities. My greatest success will come from the degree to which I’m able to help you achieve your success. I’m not just making this up it’s based on a lot of observation. Have a look at Adam Grants work, the professor at

Wharton and his book Give and Take, he lays out the research for this. The most successful people are the ones that tend to make other people more successful. It’s starting with that mindset it’s challenging to our ego as leaders because we tend to think that—if I go out of my way to help you I’m somehow undermining my own pathway so it requires a shift in perspective and it’s very challenging for a lot of people to do that but the ones that do reap tremendous rewards.

 

Jim Rembach:     Well okay, so I guess talk about the whole full circle concept as you’re talking and relating it back to the book that’s where you started getting into those GTY pillars, as you’re explaining those. Before we go into the GTY pillars I want to talk about something that we hear often and it’s ancient wisdom and I think somebody said you can actually trace it back to 20 something different translations and things like that throughout the course of human history and that is the golden rule, treat others as you would like to be treated something along those lines. But you talk about, within the book and I’m assuming of course it’s also tied in to GTY principles or pillars that it’s talking about going beyond the tenants of that golden rule, what do you mean? 

 

Steve Farber:       It’s really interesting because every philosophy major religion on the planet has some version of the golden rule. Here in the west and the phrase the golden rule comes from the western Christian tradition, do unto others you have them do unto you but if you look into Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Native American practices it’s even at the core of humanistic atheism this idea that human beings should do good for other human beings philosophers call it the ethic of reciprocity. So when I look at that and see how prevalent it is how ubiquitous it is in all these philosophies the conclusion that I can draw from that we could draw from that is overall as human beings we tend to agree that that is a good way to be. And what’s interesting about it when you look at all those variations on the theme they all have something else in common by omission and that is that none of them has an asterisk next to the words with a footnote at the bottom that says, does not apply Monday through Friday between the hours of 9:00 to 5:00 or in any situation where paycheck is involved. There is no caveat that says, this shouldn’t apply at work. But if you look into the typical business the golden rule is not the rule. I mean even the expectation of the golden rule is not the rule it’s the exception to the rule. 

 

I think at first, again because I’m a business guy and I tend to look at a lot of things through that lens of business because I feel like if we can change the experience of what it means to go to work and our expectations of what that is the kind of help we get the kind of help that we give we can change the world we could change that we can change the world. So that’s why I focus on it and that’s where my experience is. At work it’s about taking that idea of the golden rule and as you say expanding it in this way and it creates a little bit of a paradox. And again it’s based on observation of working with—and I’ve worked with just about every kind of company you can imagine and every kind of industry for 30 years I don’t claim to have it all figured out but I’ve learned a lot and what I’ve seen, and this is the paradox, the greatest leaders that I’ve met in my work never focus the attention on their own greatness. In fact, the greatest leaders become the greatest leaders by making others greater than themselves and that is a bit of a paradox. So, you want to know how to become the greatest leader around make others greater than you. That does makes sense? Yes it actually does. Maybe not obviously in a logical sense but in practice it does. So the golden rule is do unto others as you’d have them do unto you and what I’m saying is well let’s give that little turbo boost and go beyond that and say that really do unto others in a way so that by the time you’re done working with them they’re going to be more accomplished more successful more fulfilled than you are yourself and not by virtue of you diminishing yourself but quite the opposite by virtue of you expanding yourself and using that to help them. 

 

Jim Rembach:     Okay, so I appreciate you sharing that. I started thinking too though when you think about that in theoretical terms that’s fantastic I totally get it I totally believe it. When you started referring to the practical application of that so many of those folks who you’re trying to assist or support or help to grow when you start talking about the GTY pillars which is expand yourself we’re talking about that give yourself and then replicate yourself what you essentially do is talked about going through that as a process. A lot of the people who you’re trying to support and assist they don’t see it in themselves they resist you like crazy even though you’re tell them, you’ve got it in you let’s get it out, how do you actually apply all this?

 

Steve Farber:      Yeah it’s a great question. Let’s ground this in reality, there are people that have no interest in growing. Here’s the language that I like to use for it Jim, if you can take somebody on—I call it GTY for short and you’ve used that terminology you’re greater than yourself GTY, to take somebody on as, what I like to refer to as your GTY project. Now I’ll acknowledge that some people don’t like being called the project I get that it can have a negative connotation but for the sake of conversation for the sake of practice if there’s one person, let’s just start with one person because ideally we’d like to be able to do this for all people under all circumstances and I can’t ask you to do that I can’t ask anybody to do that because I’ve not been able to figure out how to do that myself I aspired to it. I wish I could say that I’m that kind of person that raises everybody else up unconditionally and without boundaries but I’m not there yet so I can’t ask you to do that but I figure we can all start with one person. If you take on somebody as your GTY project what we need to understand is it doesn’t mean you’re going to do this for them it’s a two-way street and the commitment has to go both ways. 

 

If I come to you and say, hey Jim, I want you to be my GTY project because I see so much more in you than you see in yourself and I believe that I can give you the right kind of opportunity and coaching and connect you with the right people to really help you go on to accomplish more than you’ve ever dreamed and more than I’ve ever dreamed for myself. And you go, listen I’m fine I’m fine entering data and going home and watching TV, so thanks but no thanks. That’s cool. That’s their choice you can’t choose for somebody else. On the other hand there are lots of opportunities to find folks that are that are willing and desirous once given the opportunity to really jump into this with you. And once you get the experience of boosting somebody up like that you’re going to find in the most positive sense you’re going to find yourself addicted to the process. Because the payoff—here’s the nuance, there’s a tremendous person will pay off in helping somebody like this but that shouldn’t be the reason that you do it. I’m not going to help you solely because I’m going gain from it I’m going to help you because I want to because I believe in you because I love you because I want to see you succeed and the good news is I’m going to get tremendous payoff of on that both emotionally and also in terms of the track record and the credibility that I gained from helping people to succeed everybody’s going to see that happening then when I need help people are going to rush to my side and there’s tremendous personal capital in all this. It’s about finding the right people to work with in the beginning you want to choose your GTY project wisely at first so we can learn how to do this for more and more people. 

 

Jim Rembach:     I think what you’re talking about too is even though—we can sit here and say that, gosh, you make it so mechanical, and then you also are making it all about you but I think what you said was really important what needs to be continually focused in on is that  it really comes from a place of selflessness. 

 

Steve Farber:      This is the furthest thing from mechanical. This is a problem that I have with a lot of so called mentoring programs, you could put GTY into the general category of mentoring it’s mentoring on steroids it’s extreme mentoring it’s mentoring in a very personal way but the mechanical side of mentoring is, okay, I’m going to assign a mentor and a mentee—which I think is a word we made up there is no such thing as a mentee–but then what’s going to happen is you’re going to get together for lunch once a month and you’re going to pat your mentee on the head and you’re going to ask how things are going and there’s nothing wrong with that that’s all helpful. But that’s kind of mechanical you can’t assign this kind of thing. You can’t get overly formulaic about it there is no magic GTY step by step formula it’s kind of a messy process. I think there are things that we can pay attention to and things that we can do in terms of how we make commitments to each other and how we give feedback to each other and all that but ultimately it’s a personal relationship it’s no more mechanical than the relationship you have with your with your kids or your best friends. 

 

Jim Rembach:     I think as you were talking though and really what you were saying is that it’s finding some common habits and common ground and some common expectations and that’s all part of relationship building too in order for us to have that and know that we’re friends we don’t go five years in separation of talking or communicating or knowing how each other’s doing that is not how it works. 

 

Steve Farber:      When you get together with a friend that you haven’t seen for a long time somebody you grew up with that bond of love is there and you sit down you don’t you don’t pull out your agenda, and say, okay, first step is we’re going to catch up on what’s happened since the last time we saw each other and then—we don’t do that it’s not mechanical. There may be traditions and rituals that friends have with each other but that’s a different kind of a dynamic. 

 

Jim Rembach:     I think that’s a good point though because we kind of do that but it has become more tradition and ritual, that’s a good point. Okay, so what we’re talking about here and all of these things as far as selflessness, gosh, it just goes on and on it’s just really rooted in a whole lot of emotion and meaning and depth and focus. And one of the things that we looked at on the show in order to help us with that are quotes. So, is there a quote or two that you like that you can share? 

 

Steve Farber:      Sure. I’ll share my all-time favorite quote from one of my mentors, a guy named Terry Pierce who is the author of a book called, Leading Out Loud, which I highly recommend to your listeners arguably one of the finest executive coaches on the planet Terry is and I’m proud to call him a mentor. He was writing an article a while back in the San Francisco Examiner about his experience in coaching leaders coaching executives to help them become better leaders and what he was trying to capture in these words was, the experience of what happens for a lot of these people emotionally when the concept or the idea of leadership smacks up against the reality of leadership and what happens to them when they begin to come to terms with what the stakes might be. And it’s not a short quote but I love it so I quoted a lot so I have it committed to memory, there are many people who think they want to be Matadors only to find themselves in the ring with 2,000 pounds of bull bearing down on them and then discover that what they really wanted was to wear tight pants and hear the crowd roar. So once you find yourself in the ring really facing this thing down that’s when you realize this isn’t about accolades, status, applause, how we look how we appear it’s a very personal endeavor. And therefore it begs some pretty personal and important questions we have to ask ourselves like for example, do I really want to do this? You can’t take on a GTY project or become a better leader simply because you think you’re supposed to you have to want to and then really explore what that’s going to mean what the implication is going to be for you in terms of risk and sacrifice as well as the payoff on the upside. 

 

Jim Rembach:     I think that’s a great quote and a great way to putting all that. I would dare to say when we’re starting to talk about all of this transformation and all of this growth all of these things and when you even started talking about your background your career and being a fellow Chicagoan and all that transition is that you had a lot of humps to go through. Is there a time where you had one and you can actually share that story so that we can learn from it? 

 

Steve Farber:      Is there a time that I haven’t? Yeah, so I’ll go back to the beginning that little bio that you read I love that you take a personal approach to the intro in the bio. When I first started doing this kind of work and by this kind of work we could generally call it leadership development, I had my own business I was in the commodities business as you mentioned in the intro from the outside looking in it was the American dream I wasn’t even 30 years old yet I had three kids I had my own shop my own brokerage firm I was responsible for everything from hiring to marketing to compliance to sales and the whole thing that’s where I learned how to be a business guy. And from the outside looking in it was all great but from the inside I hated it I hated that industry. No offense to any commodities brokers who may be listening to this but it’s an industry that for the most part tends to be driven primarily even solely by money and the money that the broker makes not the money that the client makes it’s a speculative investment it’s like going to Vegas which means people are going to lose their money, so I had a moral dilemma with my own business so I got out. Here’s the hump issue, I got out without having any idea what I was going to go into and I had a family to feed but I couldn’t bear the moral dilemma that I had. I knew two things with equal clarity, number one, I knew that there was something I was supposed to be doing on this planet I was absolutely clear on it and I was equally clear that I had no freaking idea what it was I had no idea. When I heard through the grapevine from an old friend of mine about another old friend that was doing some kind of work with corporations doing some kind of workshops and that’s as vague as it was all my lights went on and I said, that’s it that’s what I’m supposed to be doing. I didn’t know what it was I had to go learn it. 

 

What is this learning and development? I didn’t even know that industry existed but there was something that resonated so I went about the work of researching it and I found that my background lined up with that pretty well. And I had people that gave me a chance early on and that set me off on a trajectory, this was back in 1988-89 where for the first time in my life I was really clear from a professional standpoint what I was going to pursue. But it wasn’t a straight up trajectory it is a challenge at every turn as there is for all of us. This is a dynamic that I refer to in—my first book is called, The Radical Leap, and one of the principles in leap is this idea of pursuing the OS!M, which is spelled capital O, capital S, exclamation mark, capital M which stands for the o shit moment. And what I found was true for all of us as human beings particularly as leaders that the OS!M that feeling of fear and risk and exhilaration all kind of  wrapped in together is a natural part of the process and in fact if you’re not experiencing the OS!M with some frequency in the context of your leadership endeavors you’re not really leading so push it to the point where it scares you a little bit now you know you’re in the game. That does makes sense? 

 

Jim Rembach:     It absolutely makes sense and I had one of those yesterday and I’ll probably have one again today because I don’t know if I’ve had it yet. Maybe that’s one of those things that you have to ask yourself for reality checks and say, have you had one of those moments?

 

Steve Farber:      Exactly, exactly really it’s about pursuing that with intent which is very counterintuitive and doesn’t sound all that attractive to most of us but in the right context it is actually a good thing. Back to GTY for a moment this idea that I’m going to invest in you in such a way that you’re going to go on and become more successful than I am as an OSM for a lot of people. Am I taking a risk here? Is this going to diminish me in some way, like we were talking about earlier the fear is actually an indication that you’re doing or about to do something significant, so it’s really learning how to pursue that with conscious intent. This is not risk for risks sake it’s not doing stupid things to create the experience of an OSM those things that we know we need to do but we don’t because we’re scared to do it. And if the only reason you can think of to not do something is because the idea scares you then that’s the reason to do it. 

 

Jim Rembach:     That’s a good point okay so now with that being said and when I start thinking about you three books all the work that you’re doing stepping away from the commodities doing what you’ve been doing for quite a long time looking over the bay, you don’t have to rub it, but when you start thinking about all of these things that you have going what’s one of your goals? 

 

Steve Farber:      Thank you for that question. We’re in the process of launching—it sounds strange because  I’ve been in business for a while and we’re launching our company, so my business for many years has been really very simple: I speak, I write, I consult, it’s been a very simple thing. My wife and I and a virtual team of  about 120 facilitators who are certified in my extreme leadership workshop but just recently I’ve put together a team to really launch the extreme Leadership Institute in a significant way. So we have investors we’re funding it we have full-on culture change clients and for the first time I’m kind of stepping back from the operational side. I’m the chairman and founder Brian Stevens is the CEO, General Lynch is the president of the company, we have an amazing team. On the one hand it’s this amazing fulfillment of what I’ve been working towards for the last 30 years. And on the other hand, in some ways it’s a little bit of an OS!M because I’m taking my brand and I’m putting it in the hands of other folks the good news is my trust for them is so deep and they understand my work in many ways better than I do but we’re taking on the world and it’s really quite an extraordinary thing to see happen,  we’re in the very early stages of this. 

 

Jim Rembach:     And the Fast Leader Legion wishes you the very best. Now before we move on let’s get a quick word from our sponsor. 

 

An even better place to work is an easy-to-use solution that gives you a continuous diagnostic on employee engagement along with integrated activities that will improve employee engagement and leadership skills in everyone. Using this award-winning solution is guaranteed to create motivated, productive and loyal employees who have great work relationships with their colleagues and your customers. To learn more about an even better place to work visit beyondmorale.com/better. 

 

Jim Rembach:     Alright, here we go Fast Leader Legion it’s time for the Hump day Hoedown. Okay, Steve, the Hump day Hoedown is a part of our show where you give us good insights fast. We’ll ask you several questions but your job is to give us robust and rapid responses that are going to help us move onward and upward faster. Steve Farber, are you ready to hoedown? 

 

Steve Farber:      Yes, as long as I can talk really slowly. Sure go ahead fire away. 

 

Jim Rembach:     What do you think is holding you back from being an even better leader today?

 

Steve Farber:      I have a tendency to take on too many projects all at once and a lot of things end up falling through the cracks. 

 

Jim Rembach:     What is the best leadership advice you have ever received?

 

Steve Farber:      Oh, man that’s not a quick answer. If you get negative feedback so-called negative feedback even if you don’t believe it’s true assume that they’re right and go from there. 

 

Jim Rembach:     What is one of your secrets that you believe contributes to your success?

 

Steve Farber:      I love people. 

 

Jim Rembach:     What do you feel is one of your best tools that helps you lead in business or life?

 

Steve Farber:      My ability to communicate in various media: video, audio, etc. 

 

Jim Rembach:     What would be one book that you’d recommend to our listeners, it could be from any genre, of course we’ll put a link to, Greater than Yourself on your show notes page as well as well as your other books. 

 

Steve Farber:      Sure. I won’t recommend my own books even though I do recommend my own books either ethically theoretical edge, Greater than Yourself, but for the most part in the leadership arena I would recommend, The Leadership Challenge by Jim Kouzes and Barry Posner. 

 

Jim Rembach:     Okay, Fast Leader legion you can find links to that and other bonus information from today’s show by going to fastleader.net/stevefarber. Okay, Steve this is my last Hump Day Hoedown question: Imagine you were given the opportunity to go back to the age of 25. And you can take the knowledge and skills that you have now back with you but you can’t take it all back you can only choose one. What skill or piece of knowledge would you take back with you and why?

 

Steve Farber:      The ability the tools and the confidence to write. If I could talk to my 25 year old self I would say listen just start writing your experience for other people to read because they’ll respond to it.

 

Jim Rembach:     Steve, it was an honor to spend time with you today can you please share with the Fast Leader legion how they can connect with you?

 

Steve Farber:      I can. I love how you started talking really fast when you started talking about fast leadership before that you were so laid-back and kind of mellow that all of a sudden started talking like this so you got my heart rate going I got to hooh let me just settled down for a second, what was the question? 

 

Jim Rembach:     How can the legion get in touch with you Steve?

 

Steve Farber:      Yeah, the best place is stevefarber.com, if you can remember my name. On Twitter I’m @stevefarber on Instagram I’m Steve Farber at Facebook I’m Steve Farber on LinkedIn at Steve Farber and then the website is stevefarber.com feel free to drop me a line at steve@stevefarber.com and I’m pretty good at responding. I know it’s going to sound pathetic but this is how I make friends nowadays. So reach out to me and be my friend and we can get a conversation going. 

 

Jim Rembach:     So Steve Farber, thank you for sharing your knowledge and wisdom the Fast Leader legion honors you and thanks you for helping us get over the hump. Woot! Woot!

 

Thank you for joining me on the fast leader show today. For recaps links from every show special offers and access the download and subscribe, if you have already, head on over a fastleader.net so we can help you move onward and upward faster. 

 

END OF AUDIO