Chris Griffiths Show Notes Page

Chris Griffiths sold his company at the age of 26 and thought that he had the knowledge to turn anything into gold. After losing his home and several cars he learned that it’s not knowledge that creates success, but instead it’s the ability to improve your creative thinking skills.

Chris was born in Cleveland OH, and spent the earliest part of his childhood in Birmingham AL. An only child, Chris was adopted by British parents who he moved with to Wales, UK as a kid.

Chris’ parents were explorers and they moved from America to Wales to seek opportunity; they had successful careers with their own businesses.
Showing a natural flair for entrepreneurship at a young age – Chris setup his first shop selling homemade lead figures during school. But ultimately, Chris was not pleased with his negotiating skills with the school taking a 25% cut of his revenue. And that’s not all Chris achieved during his school days, either, at just 16 he sold his first software game – but then failed his computer science A-level exams at the age of 18.

Not to be deterred, Chris setup his first company which he sold at the age of 26. Falling trap to the hubris which so often accompanies early success, he then lost his next company – along with his house and five sports cars!

But, showing the resilience now integral to his own creative message, Chris continued to innovate and had soon built one of the fastest growing tech companies in Europe, which went on to become a PLC.

Despite significant success with this company, Chris ultimately walked away after disagreement with the board who were not open to new, innovative ideas.

After leaving, Chris was determined to bring his vision of tech and creativity to fruition; alas, he setup OpenGenius. Here, he established a highly-commended creativity training network, as well as spending several years developing Mind Mapping and Task Management software which has been used by teams and individuals from Nasa, Disney, McDonalds and Nike – to name a few.

Chris is also the author of The Creative Thinking Handbook: Your Step-by-Step Guide to Problem Solving in Business. This book enables you to develop your creative problem-solving skills to make better decisions with an individualized step-by-step strategy. Based on long-term research and testing of the creative thinking process, it will help you to generate more ideas and find brilliant solutions for any professional challenge.

Chris proudly lives and works in Wales and is married to wife Gaile – with whom he has two amazing children.

Quotes and Mentions

Listen to @GriffithsThinks to get over the hump on the @FastLeaderShowClick to Tweet

“Technology is impacting on how people think and their ability to create. And it’s not always good.” – Click to Tweet

“The focus in business today seems to be all about speed. But that’s the completely wrong way to look at things.” – Click to Tweet

“You need to be able to spend more time thinking rather than just doing.” – Click to Tweet

“Knowledge used to be power, it’s no longer power. Information is cheap.” – Click to Tweet

“The real power is in the creation of new knowledge.” – Click to Tweet

“We lose the ability to be creative for a whole load of reasons.” – Click to Tweet

“The decision radar allows you to ascertain how you make decisions.” – Click to Tweet

“Human beings are decision making machines.” – Click to Tweet

“When you’re making decisions in business, 99.99% you don’t have to make an instant call. However, most people operate under that mindset.” – Click to Tweet

“You can’t be a leader if you’re always reactive.” – Click to Tweet

“A good leader knows that they have to give themselves good thinking time.” – Click to Tweet

“Sometimes it’s not knowing what to do that makes the difference, it’s knowing what not to do.” – Click to Tweet

“Innovation isn’t an event, it’s a process.” – Click to Tweet

“Unless you solve the right problem, you’re not going to get anywhere.” – Click to Tweet

“Companies come up with a lot of great ideas, they just don’t know how to pick the right ones?” – Click to Tweet

“You can’t be as creative as you might want to be unless you start with the right mindset.” – Click to Tweet

“The difference between a leader and a follower is innovation.” – Click to Tweet

“Any company that wants to survive is going to need creative leadership.” – Click to Tweet

“If you have fear in the creative process it’s never going to work.” – Click to Tweet

“Success and failure are not opposites, they are part of the same process.” – Click to Tweet

“To be innovative you have to constantly change into something new.” – Click to Tweet

“To be a good leader you have to be a good coach.” – Click to Tweet

“When you lose your ability to use your imagination you just destroy your creativity.” – Click to Tweet

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Hump to Get Over

Chris Griffiths sold his company at the age of 26 and thought that he had the knowledge to turn anything into gold. After losing his home and several cars he learned that it’s not knowledge that creates success, but instead it’s the ability to improve your creative thinking skills.

Advice for others

Enjoy more of the good times and stop sweating about the bad times.

Holding him back from being an even better leader

I’m not spending enough time on the things a leader should.

Best Leadership Advice

Don’t worry about problems because they are a sign you are pushing the boundaries.

Secret to Success

My ability to use focused daydreaming in order to create and come up with ideas.

Best tools in business or life

Using Aoya to build better and stronger ideas.

Recommended Reading

The Creative Thinking Handbook: Your Step-by-Step Guide to Problem Solving in Business

The Little Prince

Contacting Chris Griffiths

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/chris-griffiths-5897a498/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/GriffithsThinks

Resources and Show Mentions

Ayoa – Mind Mapping

Creative Thinking at NASA

Dr. KH Kim and the Creativity Crisis

Call Center Coach

An Even Better Place to Work

Show Transcript: 

Click to access edited transcript

243: Chris Griffiths: Knowledge is no longer power

Intro: Welcome to the Fast Leader podcast where we uncover the leadership life hacks that help you to experience, breakout performance faster and rocket to success and now here’s your host customer and employee engagement expert and certified emotional intelligence practitioner, Jim Rembach. 

 

Call Center coach develops and unites the next generation of call center leaders. Through our e-learning and community individuals gain knowledge and skills and the six core competencies that is the blueprint that develops high-performing call center leaders. Successful supervisors do not just happen. So go to callcentercoach.com to learn more about enrollment and download your copy of the Supervisor Success Path e-book now.

 

Okay, Fast Leader legion today I’m excited because I have somebody on the show today who’s really going to put some tactical ways, applications and really outcomes for us to be able to do what we need to do today from a competitive landscape perspective. Chris Griffiths was born in Cleveland, Ohio and spent the earliest part of his childhood in Birmingham, Alabama. An only child, Chris was adopted by British parents who he moved with to Wales, UK as a kid. Chris’s parents were explorers and they moved from America to Wales to seek opportunity they had successful careers with their own businesses. Showing a natural flair for entrepreneurship at a young age Chris set up his first shop selling homemade led figures during school. But ultimately, Chris was not pleased with his negotiating skills with the school taking a 25% cut of his revenue. And that’s not all Chris achieved during his school days either, at 16 he sold his first software game but then failed his computer science, A level exams at the age 18. Not to be deterred Chris set up his first company which he sold at the age of 26. Failing trapped to the hubris which so often accompanies early successes then he lost his next company along with his house and five sports cars. But showing the resilience now integral to his own creative message Chris continued to innovate and have soon built one of the fastest growing tech companies in Europe which went on to become a TLC. 

 

Despite significant success with his company Chris ultimately walked away after a disagreement with the board who are not open to new innovative ideas.