page title icon 182: Jonathan Low: If it fails, it’s not me failing

Jonathan Low Show Notes Page

Jonathan Low worked 80 hours a week for two and a half years. Then his body collapsed and he began to doubt himself. It took him an entire year to recover and learn to change his perspective on what is success, how to fail and to be a happy person and to find gurus to inspire you.

Jonathan was born and raised in a small city called Aarhus in Denmark (Europe). He has 2 younger sisters May and Kira. His father works as a psychologist and his mom as a social welfare worker.

In his younger years, Jonathan Løw was a national champion in the sport of badminton. He was passionate both about his sport and starting up small and local projects. Today he is one of Denmark’s most well-known entrepreneurs and business authors. He has been nominated as Entrepreneur of the Year and is amongst Denmark’s 100 most promising leaders according to a major Danish business newspaper.

In addition to being a serial entrepreneur, Løw is the former Head of Marketing at the KaosPilots – named Top 10 most innovative business schools in the world by FastCompany. He is also former Startup-Advisor and Investor at Accelerace – the leading investment fund for startups in Denmark.

His books, Listen Louder and The Disruption Book, both made it to the top of the bestseller-lists in 2015 in the category “Business and Entrepreneurship”. His latest book, The GuruBook – is an inspiring collection of 45 articles and interviews with well-known thought leaders and entrepreneurs, whose leadership and strategic skills have resulted in very successful businesses.

Jonathan Løw wants to inspire others to follow their dreams and enable them to do so by sharing the experience and working tools from other great entrepreneurs and leaders of our time.

Jonathan still lives in Denmark, but frequently travels across the world to doing keynote speeches and workshops with major companies such as Vestas, LEGO and others.

Tweetable Quotes and Mentions

Listen to @jonathanlowdk to get over the hump on the @FastLeaderShow Click to Tweet  

“How are we going to use all of this new technology to improve lives and not de-humanize ourselves?” -Jonathan Low Click to Tweet 

“Whenever I hear about something that we can do, I always try ask myself, should we do it.” -Jonathan Low Click to Tweet 

“Should we build everything and how do we guide the tech world?” -Jonathan Low Click to Tweet 

“Fear is not a bad feeling, as long as it doesn’t paralyze you.” -Jonathan Low Click to Tweet 

“I’m working on building my fifth company and it’s always a combination of fascination and fear.” -Jonathan Low Click to Tweet 

“I know I should love the process, but really I love when things have impact.” -Jonathan Low Click to Tweet 

“When you have a smartphone, you don’t go back to a dumbphone.” -Jonathan Low Click to Tweet 

“An idea is also an action in the sense that it can create a change in your own mind.” -Jonathan Low Click to Tweet 

“The idea is a very little part and the execution is everything.” -Jonathan Low Click to Tweet 

“I meet a lot of nice human beings with good intentions and I meet too few people that act on this intention.” -Jonathan Low Click to Tweet 

“There’s a far gap between idea and execution.” -Jonathan Low Click to Tweet 

“The future belongs to the curious people.” -Jonathan Low Click to Tweet 

“You need people to challenge the status quo and the executors that actually make it happen.” -Jonathan Low Click to Tweet 

“When you decide to become a leader you also decide to take all the blame if something fails.” -Jonathan Low Click to Tweet 

“If the leader doesn’t want to take the blame, then you don’t want to take the risk.” -Jonathan Low Click to Tweet 

“We have an old stone age brain that has limitations and we should respect that.” -Jonathan Low Click to Tweet  

Hump to Get Over

Jonathan Low worked 80 hours a week for two and a half years. Then his body collapsed and he began to doubt himself. It took him an entire year to recover and learn to change his perspective on what is success, how to fail and to be a happy person and to find gurus to inspire you.

Advice for others

Know your limits and when you need to recharge your batteries.

Holding him back from being an even better leader

That I don’t really want to be a leader. I want to be an entrepreneur.

Best Leadership Advice

That I should listen more.

Secret to Success

That I have been born with and developed a creative mind.

Best tools that helps in Business or Life

The lean start-up method.

Recommended Reading

The GuruBook: Insights from 45 Pioneering Entrepreneurs and Leaders on Business Strategy and Innovation

Winning Without Losing

Contacting Jonathan Low

website: https://www.listenlouder.dk/

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jloew/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/jonathanlowdk

Resources and Show Mentions

Call Center Coach

Empathy Mapping


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Show Transcript: 

182: Jonathan Low: If it fails, it’s not me failing

Intro: Welcome to the Fast Leader Podcast, where we uncover the leadership like hat that help you to experience, break out performance faster and rocket to success. And now here’s your host, customer and employee engagement expert and certified emotional intelligence practitioner, Jim Rembach.

 

Call center coach develops and unites the next generation of call center leaders. Through our e-learning and community individuals gain knowledge and skills in the six core competencies that is the blueprint that develops high-performing call center leaders. Successful supervisors do not just happen so go to callcentercoach.com to learn more about enrollment and download your copy of the Supervisor Success Path e-book now.

 

Jim Rembach: Okay, Fast Leader legion today I’m excited because I have somebody on the show today who is really going to give us some insight into the global impact of three important pillars. Jonathan Low was born and raised in a small city called Aarhus, Denmark. He has two younger sisters Mae and Kyra. His father works as a psychologist and his mom is a social welfare worker. In his early years, Jonathan Low was a national champion in the sport of badminton. He was passionate about both his sport and starting up small and local projects. Today he’s one of Denmark’s most well-known entrepreneurs and business authors. He has been nominated as an entrepreneur of the year and is among Denmark’s 100 most promising leaders according to a major Danish business newspaper. In addition to being a serial entrepreneur, Low is a former head of marketing at the KaosPilots named top 10 most innovative business schools in the world by FastCompany. He’s also a former startup advisor and investor at Accelerace—the leading invest leading investment fund for startups in Denmark. 

 

His book, Listen Louder, and the, Disruption book both made it to the top of the bestseller list in 2015 in the category of business and entrepreneurship. His latest book, The Guru book is an inspiring collection of 45 articles and interviews with well-known thought leaders and entrepreneurs whose leadership and strategic skills have resulted in very successful businesses. Jonathan Low wants to inspire others to follow their dreams and enable them to do so by sharing the experience and working tools from other great entrepreneurs and leaders of our time. 

 

Jonathan still lives in Denmark but frequently travels across the world to do keynote speeches and workshops with major companies such as Vestas, Lego, and others. Johnathan Low, are you ready to help us get over the hump?

 

Jonathan Low: Absolutely. Let’s do it. 

 

Jim Rembach: I’m glad you’re here. Now I’ve given our legion a little bit about you but can you share what your current passion is so that we get to know you even better. 

 

Jonathan Low: So I’m actually very passionate about the space between artificial intelligence and then human beings. How are we going to use all this new technology to improve lives and not humanize our stoves and have nothing to do at the end? So yeah, I’m from the tech world but most and foremost I’m a human like everyone else so I have a passion and concern about the latest developments within this field. 

 

Jim Rembach: I think that concern is for everybody and a lot of the concern comes into the things that I think will really affect our whole stability in regards to those whole fear factor issues. Fear of am I going to get hurt by it? Am I going to get invaded by it? Am I going to be affected by it meaning it’s going to affect my career? And so when you start thinking about that from an innovative perspective and talk about leadership of innovation and creative thinking is there a possibility that all of that human emotion and fear could be squashing some innovations that otherwise we would have? 

 

Jonathan Low: Yeah, absolutely and sometimes maybe that’s not even a bad thing there is also like—I also have a big love for technology but I also think that we should not just innovate for the sense of innovation or because we can do it we should always—opposes are a good thing and being hesitant is a good thing and doubt is a good human feeling. Whenever I hear about something that we can do I always try to ask myself should we do it as well? So I’m not really doubting that in the future we can build almost everything. Maybe the bigger question will be should we build everything? And how do we guide the tech world and young people into—because this is also like philosophy within business and philosophy is very small in business and very big in other subjects and part of our lives. Even that companies become as big as nations in turnover they also start to have the same kind of responsibility I think as humans and as nations to start thinking about what they’re doing. I think that all the debate with Zuckerberg and Facebook is showing just this that we’re realizing while these were not just idealistic cool Silicon Valley nerds these were also really good business people that are growing businesses at a scale where we don’t really understand what it’s doing to us and our societies. And now we are starting to doubt whether it’s entirely good and I think this doubt and discussion is really crucial. 

 

Jim Rembach: That’s a really interesting point. Did you just add fuel to that whole fear? 

 

Jonathan Low: Yeah, fear is also a bad feeling as long as it doesn’t paralyze you it also makes you move. I have started four companies and currently building my fifth and it’s always a combination of fascination and fear. I don’t see as failing because I’ve tried it before but I fear that we will spend years of our lives because that is our most important currency, that’s our time so I feel that we spent a lot of time and energy on a project that ends up having no impact in the world because then for me it’s a waste of time. I know you should love the process but really I love when things have impacts. And when they don’t I feel I have wasted my time on them. 

 

Jim Rembach: Yeah, and one of the comments that you made in the book that you talked about the companies of the future and the billion dollar companies of the future are going to be the companies that can affect a billion lives in our world, that’s a pretty impactful statement. But there’s three pillars that the Guru book is pretty much centered around and it’s the entrepreneurship, the innovation, and the authentic leadership. And I think you were really talking about initially that authentic leadership piece—are we doing the right thing? Are we doing the things that can impact and affect humanity the most? And so when I think about the 45 contributors to putting this book you don’t even call yourself and author you call yourself an editor of the book which was great. All 45 of those are in here for various reasons. But if you were to say that there was kind of one that kind of just stood out, why did it stand out the most? And what should we what should we take away from that particular one? 

 

Jonathan Low: I think I interviewed a guy called Daniel Burrows he’s from the US who is a serial entrepreneur and a futurist and he inspired me a great deal in his way of talking about how much we actually know about the future if we sit down and spend time understanding what is going on right now. Because of all this digital development there are some accelerators that are going to happen whether we do it or not and the question is how are we then going to deal with the impact of this? When you have a smartphone you don’t go back to a dumb phone. And when you have 4G you’re going to get 5G and 6G and so everything is going to speed up meaning that you can do more. With all this talk about artificial intelligence we’ve been talking about it forever but now it’s coming to a point where we can actually utilize it and then the question becomes so now when the technology is ready what are we going to do about it? And that is Burrow’s big point that we have a lot of hard trends that we know pretty accurately when they are going to have a huge impact on our societies but the question remaining is it’s up to us to then decide which way is that impact going to go. We can make a lot of jobs automatic and we can choose not to do so. And if companies decide that they will—the biggest target is to have no one working for them because that is going to be the best business model in the end then what are all the rest going to do? And are we going to lose some of the people in our companies that might not be grading maximum value on the bottom line but might be the colleagues that makes it attractive to actually go to work. Not the top salesman but the human resource staff or just the leader who shows empathy and who is authentic and makes us feel good about ourselves. 

 

Jim Rembach:      I think that’s a really interesting point and that’s also a skill that has been notably in great need. And that’s one of the things that we talk about a lot on the Fast Leader show is that it is that emotional intelligent leader that is the one that is part of a higher producing team it’s not the one who knows everything it’s the one who can get the best out of everyone that’s really the differentiating factor. And even when you started talking about an important point is that if we stop and think about the future we can come up with all kinds of ideas. But there was one thing that you actually wrote in the introduction to me that was just so impactful and I want to share it, it was that, we cultivate thinking about good ideas far too much while we cultivate the craft of transforming the ideas into reality far too little. What made you come to that type of conclusion?

 

Jonathan Low:    Yeah, an idea is also an action in the sense that it can create a change in your own mind. When an ideas time has come it can be really powerful but only if we actually execute on it and everyone who’s been an entrepreneur will know that the idea is very little part and the execution is everything. The point is that I meet a lot of very nice human beings with great intentions and I meet to too fee people that maybe act on this intention because of one reason or another. It’s very seldom laziness a lot of times not knowing how to go about it. If you don’t come from, for instance a household where it’s natural or a culture it’s natural. I was born in a home and in a family where there has never been an entrepreneur before so I didn’t get it from my parents or from sisters or brothers. I grew up in in a part of our country where when I started my first company in 1999 there was not really an entrepreneurial culture, there’s nothing like Silicon Valley or any other places. A lot of people will become scared of starting off because it doesn’t feel natural. 

 

Now when you do it a lot of times it starts to feel more natural not that you don’t make mistakes but it’s just like, the training part of it, like you mentioned I was national champion in badminton, it’s something completely different but then on the other side it’s the same with sports as with entrepreneurship in that the more times you practice doing it the less awkward it feels. Actually trying to test out a new idea and of course you also will become better at it. So you also become better at being like your own critic and when you have an idea you start to understand that there’s a gap between idea and execution. You have had so many bad ideas over the years and luckily I was I was realistic enough to drop them. And then at some point like with the start of I’m currently working on you have this gut feeling that there is a market need for this and also it feels right so this is the combination of—that’s also why the book has these different topics because one thing is talking about listening to yourself and understanding is this something worth spending the next five to ten years of my life on because that’s what you have to do if you want to start a growth company it’s going to take five to ten years. So you have to think about this first is this worth the time and effort? And then also think realistically is there a business model or something. 

 

Jim Rembach:       That’s really interesting. When you start talking about that and how the time component is one of those factors that could cause that pause that you were referring to. Here’s one of the thing that also stood out in the book that you had written in the introduction, you talked about the difference between knowledge and learning and you kind of really—we’re just talking about that yourself as far as being in the right environment going through and having the mistakes and  it’s not a situation anymore because you’ve gone through it several times that you’re worried about certain factors but talking about difference between knowledge and learning and says that the knowledge and being able to convert it into practice which is the craft that you need to build is something that you’re responsible for. And so when you start talking about taking all of this information and the people that you were referring to that it’s not a laziness thing it’s the know-how thing you have to get better at know how seek that out because here’s the thing when you start talking about entrepreneur and I refer to a lot of people who are within organizations that have to transform they have to do things differently than it used to be. The world keeps changing and smaller and smaller clips it used to be that people would say, well ten years ago, and then it became people said, well five years ago, and now it’s like, well three years ago, if you were doing what you were doing three years ago that’s outdated already. So you have to be someone inside an organization that has that entrepreneurial spirit and has to do things that causes and helps that company to transform. And when you start thinking about that those people who I’m already in a particular position and I need to do something different, where are they going to get their best inspiration to build those skills and build better practices? 

 

Jonathan Low:    I really think the future belongs to the curious people and we need these curious people in all organizations. When we start asking questions I think the main part of good leadership good entrepreneurship is having people that dare to challenge the status quo and then having the executors that actually make it happen and you need that both in startups and in corporate and often times I see people failing because they have one or the other. So you have an inventor who has a great idea but hates to sell or maybe doesn’t know how to do it and then you have the sales man who doesn’t really know how to solve problems that are they’re so it because she has been used to selling products that were already on the market and the same in organizations you need you need to have the leaders that set out a course and don’t drive away from it and then you also need to have the visionary leaders who dare to fail together with their teams. 

 

Leadership is as Simon Sinek writes in the book, Leadership is not a rank it’s a choice, so when you decide to become a leader you also decide to take all the blame if something fails. We need to have these leaders in organizations that wants to change that are willing to take the blame on behalf of their teams because when you innovate you also fail and that is sort of what people have been saying for ages. But the problem has been that it’s a nice thing to say but failing also means taking the blame somewhere in organization and if the leader doesn’t want to take the blame then you don’t want to take the risk. I see a lot of times in organization where they say we want to be innovative and we have an innovation strategy and it’s okay to fail and then something really fails and then everybody is like yeah but it was not really my fault and it’s a really bad culture. You have to mean, that is again the thing with this book is that I try to find people that have actually done it so it exceeds the motivational speaker/mantras because it’s so easy to say, just come up with great ideas and do it—fail thing big expose fail cheap and fast blah blah blah, we have all these nice sayings. But then we also need to have really courageous and authentic leaders that say, okay this is part of what I do in this organization I am strong enough to take the blame from the CEO when my innovation team loses 10 million because they went in the wrong direction.

 

Jim Rembach:         I think that’s a very great point. I would dare to say if you’re one of those creative leaders that’s willing to do all that you really just need to find the right organization that enables you instead of disables you. 

 

Jonathan Low:    Yeah, absolutely. We need to have, I think I mentioned it before, we need to have very different kind of competencies within companies. We need to have the people that’s really come up with these bold new ideas and then we need to have the people that act upon them and then we need to have the people who are willing to take the blame when they fail but then on the other hand also get all the praise when they succeed and you need these three sort of core competencies both in a start-up and in an established business. And there is a tendency that you don’t hire the bold thinkers when you get thru corporate because then you want to streamline everything and make even more money so you hire the people that are good at making even more money. There is a tendency in startup to have too many bold thinkers that maybe lack a bit of business understanding or realism and then they fail because they don’t know how to turn this into a profitable business. 

 

Jim Rembach:       Yeah, that’s an awesome point. Okay, going through this book there’s a whole lot of inspiring people and then you also infused it with a whole lot of quotes from other people in which to me I just enjoyed going through. And just looking at all the folks that are involved, because there’s a lot of names that I never heard of you exposed me from a global perspective to a lot of people and I thank you for that, but then also just going back and reflecting on some of the people who’ve been around or at least that we’ve known of for literally thousands of years who kind of started this you’re talking about out Aristotle and Socrates and you talked about several others it just got me to think about things that inspire us. On the show we do that through quotes, now I know with all the research and putting all this together you probably literally have hundreds if not thousands of quotes that you can reference, but is there one or two that kind of stands out to you that you can share?

Jonathan Low:    I don’t even know if they’re from the book actually but I have two quotes that I love and they’re not—the first one I don’t know who actually said this but I read this quote—the world is giving you answers each day you just have to listen. A quote that I really love because it’s sparks this creative curious mind. And the other one is sort of maybe it’s an entrepreneurial quote but it’s actually from a Bruce Springsteen song and the song is titled Working on a Dream. And I love this title and the dream can be so different from each one of us but this thing that should be what you’re doing when you’re an entrepreneur in my mind you have something that is so important that you’re willing to fight and take all the hard knocks along the way because the idea is bigger than yourself. 

 

Jim Rembach:         Those are two great ones, thanks for sharing. Now you also talked about going through several iterations from your own startups you talked about growing up in an area that really didn’t have that incubation that was happening for entrepreneurs you had the bold piece you said and even admitted you failed and I’m sure there’s been other times that you failed that have actually added to your knowledge and practice right but can you share one of those stories when had to get over the hump? 

 

Jonathan Low:    I had a very personal one where I had been working too much for two and a half years and working 80 hours a week and I ended up having stress which turned into a depression. For someone like me who has always been—and now today luckily it’s like a happy person, and my mood is very stable, going through a period which was almost a year it’s like a big hump where I had felt terrible. I also lost my belief that I was an entrepreneur because maybe I couldn’t handle the stress and the pressure since my body sort of collapsed. And then coming back from this, this was actually when I started working on the guru phobia and then market then globally saying that now I want to get inspired

by people who have done things that I look up to and learn from them and then based on this build something knowing that—like I think before a startup was sort of my life and my identity and now a start-up is something I build and enjoy but if it fails it’s not me failing and I can always start a new one so it’s sort of also gave perspective. And here in Scandinavia, try to teach the young entrepreneurs that their passion is amazing and that the human brain can be passionate about everything is amazing but you should also just remember that we have a an old Stone Age brain that has its limitations and we should respect that and remember that entrepreneurship is beautiful but there’s also a lot of other things in life to consider.

 

Jim Rembach:         I think that’s a really good point and when you start having that identity being determined by what it is that you do instead of who you are is where it creates problems. I want to bring up a really important point because I get a lot of comments about it is that I read a bio that’s a little bit more of a personal bio we infuse some of the things about what people do and stuff I tell them I guess because a lot of them have to write the bio that I asked for they just don’t have it in there ready. So I explained, look it’s not what you do that makes you great it’s who you are that makes what you do great. And I would dare to say that even when you start looking at the gurus that are in this book you could probably say the same thing about all of them. When you were going through and looking at these people and their contributions and the discussions that you had with them I would dare to say that you found uniqueness in them as people and therefore that was the elixir or the thing that caused them to end up doing the great things that they’ve done. What are your thoughts on that?

 

Jonathan Low:    Yeah, absolutely. And I also I think I write it in the in the foreword I was very hesitant about using the title The Guru Book because all the people I met didn’t want to get referred to as Gurus so that is why I spent some time on explaining what is meant with this. Because in the old meaning of the word it’s more like a teacher and a mentor and inspirators not somebody who is unachievable or that you should look up to like some sort of God. It’s very interesting that for a lot of these people the most successful they have become the more humble they have become and I think that’s also a part of what I like about them because you can also become very successful and very arrogant. And I really tried to avoid these kind of people in the book because I’m very inspired to see how people also grow as human beings so they realize they’ve created something amazing and then they sort of want to pass it on to others and I think that it’s a beautiful insight to get so that’s also part of how to select 45 people to a book who have so many and I was also looking for people where I see, wow, they have built something that’s made a lot of money but now they’re really interested in from an open good heart to inspire others. And that is also the purpose of that was to fellate these people and give some hands-on advice that other could benefit from. 

 

Jim Rembach:       I’m glad you shared that because for me when I think about the word legacy, what is the legacy you want to leave behind? To me that’s what I think about when I think about a legacy that I want to leave behind. I don’t want to leave the legacy behind that, hey, just to say it for example from a money perspective—made tons of money and now three generations if they didn’t anything themselves will still be able to live off my money. No, to me that’s not a legacy. Like you had said the billion dollar companies are going to affect a billion lives it has to have that type of legacy where you’re actually making an impact on humanity for the good not some monetary impact.

 

Jonathan Low:    Yeah, and especially when we both live in countries it’s like they don’t have problems and they don’t have poverty but it’s still countries where you have a big opportunity and you can view your life or your work as something more than just making money. You can also go to Africa or India where it would not be fair to ask yourself, is this a meaningful job for me? Because yeah, the meaning is given you have the job or you die. But in countries that have better options even though they also have problems I think it’s fair that people ask themselves the bigger question, does my job gives me meaning? Can I provide meaning for others? Because work is so big part of our lives and we spend so much time on it I think we should continue to challenge our employees and ourselves in in creating environments where it feels meaningful going to work and it’s not just something you do to make money. That is why I love the entrepreneurial environment because there are so many crazy people that spend so much time on building an app that maybe if you look at it from the outside and you are filosopo you will think, wow that app really doesn’t make any sense. But for this person it does and they can’t stop thinking about it when they get up in the morning and go to sleep in the evening and I love that the brain can become so passionate about something that is perhaps from a philosophical standpoint meaning meaningless.

 

Talking about passion, we all have goals. You said you’re starting your fifth company you had the Guru book you had two bestsellers prior to that you do a lot of travel and working with a lot of organizations there’s a lot of things that you’re working on and doing but if you say you had one goal one, what would it be? 

 

Jonathan Low:    If it job related it’s working with people that I really like and where we have fun and we inspire each other. Actually building this fifth startup I’ve chosen a different approach, before I was picking people to the team truly based on skills, so I see I need this very good programmer and I need this great bookkeeper, but now I’m looking much more can I see myself sitting with this person in the airport in Copenhagen wanting to go to New York and the plane is six hours late? Can I stand sitting there with him for six hours? Or will it make me go mental? So yeah, really we’re putting together a

Team where we can—because we know we have processes that are going to feel like sitting from a delayed plane in six hours and then we need to still be able to respect each other and have fun. 

 

Jim Rembach:        That’s a great point. And the Fast Leader legion wishes you the very best. Now before we move on let’s get a quick word from our sponsor.

 

The number one thing that contributes to customer loyalty is emotions. So move onward and upward faster by gaining significantly deeper insight and understanding of your customer journey and personas with emotional intelligence. With your empathy mapping workshop you’ll learn how to evoke and influence the right customer emotions that generate improve customer loyalty and reduce your cost to operate. Get over your emotional hump now by going to empathymapping.com to learn more. 

 

Jim Rembach:     Alright here we go Fast Leader legion it’s time for the Hump Day Hoedown. Okay, Jonathan, the Hump Day Hoedown is the part of our show where you give us good insights fast. So, I’m going to ask you several questions and your job is to give us robust yet rapid responses that are going to help us move onward and upward faster. Jonathan Low            , are you ready to hoedown? 

 

Jonathan Low:    Yeah, I feel express already.

 

Jim Rembach:        Alright. What do you think is holding you back from being an even better today?

 

Jonathan Low:    I don’t really want to be a leader. I want a plain entrepreneur. 

 

Jim Rembach:        What is the best leadership advice you have ever received?

 

Jonathan Low:    That I should listen more. 

 

Jim Rembach:       What is one of your secrets that you believe contributes to your success? 

 

Jonathan Low:     That I have been born with undeveloped a very creative mind. 

 

Jim Rembach:       What do you feel is one of your best tools that helps you lead in business or life?

 

Jonathan Low:    A lean start up methods. 

 

Jim Rembach:         What would be one book that you’d recommend to our listeners and it could be from any genre, of course, we’re going to put a link to the Guru book on your show notes page as well as your two other books as well. 

 

Jonathan Low:    The book called Winning without Losing. About how you can become successful without losing other important things in your life. 

 

Jim Rembach:        Okay, Fast Leader legion you can find links to that and other bonus information from today’s show by going to fastleader.net/jonathanlow. Okay Jonathan this is my last Hump Day Hoedown question, Imagine you were given the opportunity go back to the age of 25 and you’ve been given the opportunity to take the knowledge of skills that you have now back with you but you can’t take everything back you can only choose one, what skill or knowledge would you take back with you and why? 

Jonathan Low:    I would take the skill of understanding when I reach my limit workwise so I can spend more time having holiday and recharging my batteries. 

 

Jim Rembach:       Jonathan, it was an honor to spend time with you today can you please share with the Fast Leader legion how they can connect with you?

 

Jonathan Low:      Absolutely. I love LinkedIn and I have a website called listenlouder.uk. I would love to connect. 

 

Jim Rembach:      Jonathan Low, thank you for sharing your knowledge and wisdom the Fast Leader legion honors you and thanks you for helping us get over the hump. Woot! Woot!

 

Thank you for joining me on the Fast Leader Show today. For recaps, links from every show special offers and access to download and subscribe if you haven’t already, head on over the fastleader.net so we can help you move onward and upward faster. 

 

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