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Danita Bye - Millennials Matter

186: Danita Bye: This is not about complaining – it’s about doing

Danita Bye Show Notes Page

Danita Bye and her husband decided to buy a snowmobile sleigh manufacturing company. Then El Niño moved in and stayed for three years. Danita was angry at everyone. Then a mentor told her to stop playing the blame game. That’s when she developed the catalyst question.

Danita grew up on the TTT Ranch in northwestern North Dakota. 800 square foot house with no running water!  This means that she used an outdoor biffy daily and a took a Finnish sauna weekly. The sauna was located about a football field away from their house. Great in the summer time. Not quite as fun in the winter time when it was 30 below and the wind was howling at 30MPH!  FYI: Currently it’s offer one of the finest hunting preserves for pheasants in the nation!

Her parents have been married almost 60 years. She has one younger sister and two younger brothers.

Her parents continue to make a huge imprint on her life. They are entrepreneurs who figured out how to not only survive, but thrive in homestead country. So, Danita is an entrepreneur. They are intent on stewarding their gifts of encouragement and hospitality, especially to young adults. So, Danita is focused on building next gen leaders.

After completing a pre-med degree, she decided to shift directions and move into the business world. She started her career with Xerox Corporation in sales.  After about a decade in the technology space, she became an angel investor and part of a turnaround management team in the medical device world.

Having sold that company, she analyzed what she got a kick out of doing. She decided she loved helping business owners in the STEM space (Software, Technology, Engineering, Manufacturing) get traction with the sales teams. So, she started her own sales development firm, Sales Growth Specialists.

Her current book, Millennials Matter: Proven Strategies for Building Your Next Gen Leader, is part of her legacy – to inspire and encourage senior leaders to STOP complaining about Millennials, and to START coaching and mentoring them.  To inspire them to be intentional about the imprint of their Leadership Legacy.

After living for 30 years in Minneapolis, she moved back to the ranch in North Dakota about 4 years ago. She operates a global sales development and global leadership firm, overlooking the beauty of a pristine animal preserve.

She’s been married to Gordon for 33 years.  Has 3 Millennial children. 2 delightful grandchildren…with one more on the way.

Tweetable Quotes and Mentions

Listen to @DanitaBye to get over the hump on the @FastLeaderShow Click to Tweet 

“They look mature, but they haven’t gone through all the trips, falls, and crashes that we have had in life.” -Danita Bye Click to Tweet 

“60% of business leaders express some concern with working with millennials in some way.” -Danita Bye Click to Tweet 

“It’s character that destroys a leader.” -Danita Bye Click to Tweet 

“If we want to be building good, strong, solid leaders for the future, we have to start coaching virtues.” -Danita Bye Click to Tweet 

“For long-term leadership success, you’re going to have to deal with a lot of no’s in life.” -Danita Bye Click to Tweet 

“What do you get out of bed and you just naturally do?” -Danita Bye Click to Tweet 

“What is your core passion, what are you always thinking about.” -Danita Bye Click to Tweet 

“We can have a lot of discussion, but let’s put an action plan together.” -Danita Bye Click to Tweet 

“You’ve got too much talent, you’ve got too much opportunity, you’ve got too much brilliance – just shift into gear and get going.” -Danita Bye Click to Tweet 

“If you don’t create win alignment you’re not going to get the impact you want.” -Danita Bye Click to Tweet 

“You have your goal in place, you’re going to get obstacles, you’re going to get thrown off track and you just need to get back on track.” -Danita Bye Click to Tweet 

“Lack of accountability is a massive erodeer in our culture.” -Danita Bye Click to Tweet 

“If we will begin to look at what we can do differently, then that stimulates our own creative juices.” -Danita Bye Click to Tweet 

“Get active, get engaged in coaching and mentoring.” -Danita Bye Click to Tweet 

“Everything that you’ve been doing in life is preparing you to pass your leadership insight and wisdom and legacy onto the next generation.” -Danita Bye Click to Tweet 

“Don’t let excuses get in your way of making it happen.” -Danita Bye Click to Tweet 

“We don’t learn, we don’t serve, we don’t love by talking.” -Danita Bye Click to Tweet 

“Everything we want comes from listening and caring about the people in our lives.” -Danita Bye Click to Tweet 

Hump to Get Over

Danita Bye and her husband decided to buy a snowmobile sleigh manufacturing company. Then El Niño moved in and stayed for three years. Danita was angry at everyone. Then a mentor told her to stop playing the blame game. That’s when she developed the catalyst question.

Resources and Show Mentions

Call Center Coach

An Even Better Place to Work

Show Transcript: 

[expand title=”Click to access edited transcript”]

186: Danita Bye: This is not about complaining—it’s about doing

 

Intro: Welcome to the Fast Leader Podcast, where we uncover the leadership like hat that help you to experience, break out performance faster and rocket to success. And now here’s your host, customer and employee engagement expert and certified emotional intelligence practitioner, Jim Rembach.

 

Call center coach develops and unites the next generation of call center leaders. Through our e-learning and community individuals gain knowledge and skills in the six core competencies that is the blueprint that develops high-performing call center leaders. Successful supervisors do not just happen so go to callcentercoach.com to learn more about enrollment and download your copy of the Supervisor Success Path e-book now. 

 

Jim Rembach:     Okay, Fast Leader legion today I’m excited because I have somebody on the show today who’s opened up my eyes to several things and I think we’re going to have a great discussion that you’ll get some benefit from. Danita Bye grew up on the Triple T ranch in northwestern North Dakota 800 square foot house with no running water this means that she used an outdoor biffy daily and took a Finnish sauna weekly. The sauna was located about a football field away from their house, it was great in the summertime not so much fun in the wintertime when it was 30 below and the wind was howling at 30 miles an hour> Currently it offers one of the finest hunting preserves for pheasants in the nation. Her parents have been married almost 60 years. She has one younger sister and two younger brothers. Her parents continue to make a huge imprint on her life. They are entrepreneurs who figured out how to not only survive but thrive in homestead country, so Danita is an entrepreneur. They are intent on stewarding their gifts of encouragement and hospitality especially to young adults so Danita is focused on building next gen leaders.

 

After completing a pre-med degree she decided to shift directions and move into the business world. She started her career with Xerox Corporation in Sales. After about a decade in the technology space she became an angel investor and part of a turnaround management team in the medical device world. Having sold that company she analyzed what she got a kick out of doing she decided she loved helping business owners in the stem space that software technology engineering and manufacturing helping them to get traction with their sales teams. So she started her own sales development firm, Sales Growth Specialists. Her current book, Millennials Matter Proven Strategies for Building Your Next Gen Leader is part of her legacy to inspire and encourage senior leaders to stop complaining about millennials and to start coaching and mentoring them to inspire them to be intentional about the imprint of their leadership legacy.

 

After living for 30 years in Minnesota she moved back to the ranch in North Dakota about four years

Ago. She operates a global sales development and global leadership firm overlooking the beauty of a pristine animal preserve. She’s been married to Gordon for 33 years. Has three millennial children and two delightful grandchildren with one more on the way. Danita Bye, are you ready to help us get over the hump?

 

Danita Bye:    We are ready let’s go let’s roll. 

 

Jim Rembach:     I’m glad you’re here. Now I’ve given my legion a little bit about you but can you tell us what your current passion is so that we can get to know you even better? 

 

Danita Bye:    You know what, my current passion is really about energizing and equipping those senior leaders to get on track, stop complaining and to start coaching and mentoring and working with those next gen leaders. So I’ve got posters all over my office that relate to that I dream about that that’s what I’m working on. 

 

Jim Rembach:     Now there are several things in your book that kind of stood out to me that I’m looking forward to talking with you about and there’s one phrase that you use that I think senior leaders including myself have to be very, very mindful of and that is you call it artificial maturity.

 

Danita Bye:    Well, that’s actually a concept by coined by Tim Elmore which is one of the people I follow, listen, and pay attention to. And where it comes is that with all the technology and information that’s at the fingertips for millennials if they can walk into any scenario and they look knowledgeable and confident and they look good but what business leaders are telling me is that when they trip and fall or they encounter something that they’re not finding on You Tube or Google that kind of confidence kind of cracks a little bit. And so it’s important for us as leaders and coaches to recognize that they look mature but they haven’t gone through all the trips and falls and crashes that we have had in life.

 

Jim Rembach:     You know the reason I bring that up is because I just had this conversation the other day with somebody where I talked about the perception of arrogance and I said you know, oftentimes, when we perceive somebody as being arrogant really what it is it’s a mask. It’s a mask for insecurity that doubt that whole self-assurance issue and it manifests itself as that arrogance. And so sometimes we just need to stop and take pause and say, okay, I shouldn’t judge this as arrogance and therefore be offended or irritated or someone buy it  but maybe try to seek out and discover what’s the underlying things that are going on here. 

 

Danita Bye:    Absolutely, absolutely. In the research that we did for the book sixty percent of business leaders express some concern in working with millennials in some way. And actually 53 percent of them cited what they call this know-it-all attitude and you’re absolutely right is to see it as a—you use the word mask I was going to say facade and it’s something for us as leaders to recognize and to push through and to keep asking questions and learning and asking questions and spending time in developing the relationship so that we could have an imprint on their lives. You’re absolutely right. 

 

Jim Rembach:     And I also love that with the acronym that you brought up in regards to helping really coach and mentor these folks in order to be able to build so that—you mentioned the word resilience and all that and it’s Dakota. Yes, not surprising, but tell us what Dakota means?

 

Danita Bye:    Well, let me tell a little bit of the backstory on that so as we mentioned in the intro I grew up on this cattle ranch in Northwestern North Dakota I’d been living in Minneapolis for 30 years and then through a series of events felt that it was important to move back to North Dakota, that’s where my parents still live, and to get involved with the business. It was about at this same time that I had this wake-up call in a sense to start focusing on millennials. And began to think about what are the things that are important for leadership that are important for resiliency and many of those things tie to the homes, the character, qualities in the immigrants and the homesteaders that I grew up with. And so I began to develop this concept of Dakota which is really taking some of the ancient virtues, which is a word we just don’t use in modern time as virtues, but taking those ancient virtues and put it into modern language. So D stands for determination A for awareness K knowledge O optimism T trustworthy and A accountability. And that really is taking some of those ancient virtues that make for solid long-term leadership and then put them into language at least I could understand and I’m hoping that our readers can understand it too. 

 

Jim Rembach:     Well, and I think when I started looking at my kids and their education and I don’t think they get that type of clarity on building the virtues, of course we’re trying to give those things at home and I say a lot of these words a lot because of what I get exposed to and all the people who I’ve met and so I mean they’re getting that benefit but outside of that I don’t see that it’s really occurring it’s just kind of like you were saying it’s non-existent not just in our vernacular vocabulary but just in our practices.

 

Danita Bye:    Just in our practices. When I first started researching and talking to colleagues about what I was working on millennials matter the pushback that I got from my colleagues and from business leaders when I mentioned the word character was, Danita, character that’s what you work on at home you don’t work on it in the business. And then there was a whole another set of colleagues, business leaders, who said character Danita that’s a little embarrassing to talk about in the workforce isn’t it? Yes, and we know when we look at all the headlines that it is character that destroys a leader that they can cover up the flaws but you know what? It’s that character flaw that will eventually undermine them. So if we want to be building good strong, solid leaders for the future we have to start talking about and coaching determination and trustworthiness and dealing with ethics and those virtues.

 

Jim Rembach:     Well, I mean you’re right. Because the reality of where we are today, you can try to avoid it all you want but it’s not going to help, is that there isn’t a lot of that taught in the home. I’ve had the opportunity to coach baseball for past couple years with some kids and I’m just looking at some of these kids and saying how they don’t have that strength and fortitude the courage it’s just non-existent they haven’t overcome things because it’s always been so simple and easily hand it to them they haven’t had the guidance in the mentoring and the tough love but we need that we all need it. So what’s happening is now they’re getting in the workforce and guess what they haven’t had it so you got to do it.

 

Danita Bye:    We got to do it, we got to do it. I was telling a story—I’m a pre-med student I shifted gears went to work with Xerox Corporation and in those days we had to make cold calls and our activity called for making 50 cold calls a day, excuse me 50 cold calls a week and of those 50 we would if we worked the numbers right we would get one yes. That means we got 49 no’s to deal with every week, ten a day. I would do pretty good the first time but you know, man, kind of thirdsy end of the day I actually had a rule that if I cried—this is when you just had like a tear well up if I had a tear well up three times a day I was still having a good day. And the fourth time I would call my boss Bob, who was a wonderful coach and a wonderful mentor, and I was telling this story and someone said, you know, Danita that’s the difference in today’s world people probably would quit and find a new job after the first no and what we know for long-term leadership success, man, you’re got to you’re going to have to deal with a lot of nose and life to get hold get traction so that is something that we as business leaders need to be acutely aware of and to begin nurturing that in our own teams and our own young leaders. 

 

Jim Rembach:     Without a doubt. And there’s one thing that you talked about too as well that I think could also be some of that fuel and foundation for some of that cure courage and you talked about knowing what your jazz is and I think we have to help younger people really do that I mean I think for many of us that are older that are supposed to be coaching and mentoring really don’t know what that is. I think everybody needs to find their own jazz.

 

Danita Bye:    Well yeah, I think where I’ve gotten at is just looking at myself. You know there’s times for all of us that we all—I ‘m not doing well I’m not having fun this doesn’t feel like it fits it’s not purpose a whole host of question that we have to wrestle with at different times in life. What’s been insightful for me is to keep just a mini diary for about a week on I loved doing this and this was the energizing and we can do the same thing with people these people are fun these people, man, you know they just SAP energy from me. And so I’ve found when I’ve been coaching young leaders and people going through transition that it just it provides some helpful aha’s. 

 

Jim Rembach:     So when you start thinking about helping people find their jazz what it is that that you do or that you guide people or to direct people or tools that you give people in order to be able to do that.

 

Danita Bye:    So I have a couple of tools that I like. One is a process called life’s core purpose. And in life’s core purpose you begin to look at what are you just naturally competent at what do you get out of bed and you just naturally do? So what’s your core competence and then what’s your core passion what are you always thinking about? I’ll use it an example for, I guess I’ll use for me, I am no matter what situation I am in I, I get things moving I get things moving off the dime. We can have lots of discussion but let’s put an action plan together no matter where I’m going about engaging so that’s a core competence. And then my core passion is about getting people launched on the growth path. To shift into gear for me it drives me nuts when people are status quo players. You’ve got too much talent you’ve got too much opportunity you’ve got too much brilliance shift into gear and get going. Once I was able to put words around that it was just helpful for me to be able to analyze activities and that’s one of the tools that I’d like to use. 

 

Jim Rembach:     So that’s interesting that you say that because with my son who’s 13 I’ve started asking him and I told him I’m got to ask it until he can actually help you know to formulate some ideas and thoughts around as I asked him I said what is that one thing when you go to bed that you have a hard time actually going to sleep you know because of it. And when you get up in the morning it’s actually top of mind and you’re like, I can’t wait to do this and be part of this and by the way, it can’t be a video game it has to be something that actually is got to better the world. So what is that thing that’s got to better the world that you really think about all the time?

 

Danita Bye:    I love that.

 

Jim Rembach:     Right now he’s like, I don’t know I don’t know I don’t know. I said well I’m got to keep asking. I said, you’re got to have to start seeking it out. I said, and if you can’t figure it out on your own I said we’re got to sit down and figure it out together. I said, because you have to have something that is a target for you something that gives you that internal juice and something that really causes you to take that extra step instead of sit on your hining. 

 

Danita Bye:    Absolutely. There’s lots of different ways it’s just a whole—obviously with parenting there’s a whole host of ways that we can do that. Interestingly when I was hiring and building a sales team I actually asked that as part of my interview process. Remember there was one in particular I asked that too and he was at that time he was 23 24 25 and he was a little cheapy she didn’t know if he should answer that and he says, well, what I really want to do is I really want to own an auto dealership, which had nothing to do with the medical device company that I was involved in which is the reason he was a little nervous about telling me this. And I said, great, let’s talk about owning that car dealership and why is that. What are the sparks? What are the things that are interesting? And then what sort of skills do we need to be developing on a regular basis so that you’re ready to run that auto dealership? And every time we had a rhythm of doing a quarterly review where we would step back and look at a big picture we talked about it every single time.

 

Jim Rembach:         That’s what we need to do some people talking about the status quo people they would say, well gosh I don’t want to hire this person because they don’t want to work here long they just want to auto dealership and they’re just not going to stay they’re not going to be motivated. That’s not what you should do what you should do is what you did is you take that and you use it as the way for you to actually get them to motivate themselves. There’s a saying that I heard a long time ago a Kirk Weisler who was actually a guest on my show, he said, don’t make the mistake. He goes, you don’t motivate anybody that’s not the way it works people motivate themselves your job as leader is to create the environment by which they will motivate themselves.

 

Danita Bye:     Absolutely, absolutely. When typically my work is with sales organizations and getting them unstuck and moving forward and one of the very first things that I find that we have to do is to help each salesperson create alignment between their personal goals and their professional goals. Often to get alignment we have to look at what their personal goals are, which is where we talk about what jazzes them, and we have to look at what their professional goals are not what their managers goals are not what the company’s goals are but what their goals are. Then we take those and start to weave those together to create something that is inspirational, fun, energizing that they can get out of bed in the morning and have some hope and some direction for the future.

 

Jim Rembach:    I think we’re a lot of leaders make a mistake is that they don’t realize that the manager meeting his sales numbers the company meeting their sales numbers and all that’s really an output that’s an output of all the things these other things that you were just talking about. 

 

Danita Bye:    Absolutely, absolutely. There’s at least three wins like a win, win, win strategy because no matter what you do it has to be the win for the salesperson employee it has to be a win for the company it has to be a win for the client it has to be—there are so many wins and unless you create that kind of win alignment you’re not going to get the engagement you’re not going to get the business growth you’re not going to get the impact that you want so it does all need to align and come together.

 

Jim Rembach:     Without a doubt. One other thing that you expose me to and I actually had to reach out to a friend was something called the Sisu spirit, which has some Finnish origin so I reached out to my Finnish friend Yona she gave me some additional insights into Sisu, but tell us a little bit about the Sisu spirit.

 

Danita Bye:    Well, growing up in the Finnish background, you mentioned it in the bio, this going to the sauna which was a football field away when you’re three years old and four years old and it’s 30 below and the wind is howling our parents never let us off the hook this is what we needed to do. So as I look at the growing up and leading that is that’s just what you do you have your goal in place you are going to get obstacles you’re going to get thrown off track and you just you need to get back on track. I pulled this out to make certain that I got my quote correctly. I was a young salesperson at Xerox, who as I’d mentioned got tears in my eyes like three times a day, but there was a quote that I blew up into a poster I know that you’ve heard it before but it goes like this—what you do when you don’t need to determines what you will be when you can’t help it. And isn’t that the Sisu spirit that there’s a whole host of things in life that we don’t want to do? In sales we maybe don’t want to make sales calls or we don’t want to talk to this person because they’re scary we don’t want to ask this other question cause really one with send people –there’s a whole host of things in life that make us uncomfortable or they don’t make us uncomfortable. And yet in doing those things it develops that resilience and that determination and that ability to keep going and I call that the Sisu spirit coming from my Finnish heritage. 

 

Jim Rembach:     It’s definitely something that I want to research a little bit more and hopefully expose my kids to that because I’m always trying to give them things that will hopefully help them find stronger and more firm footing. Anxiety is a huge problem with a lot of youth today, quite frankly for everybody today, for a lot of different reasons. 

 

Danita Bye:    Yes. We live in an anxious, anxious ridden society. 

 

Jim Rembach:     Without a doubt. You shared that quote, thanks for doing that, and I’m sure too when you start thinking about—you talked about that sales experience and actually growing through that you talked about in your bio being an investor a lot of different things that you’ve done having this business the book, but I’m sure there’s humps that you’ve had to get over that have taught you a lot. Is there one of those stories that you can share so we can learn?

 

Danita Bye:    So my life is filled with hopes it just seems like we’re always kind of working through. There’s one in particular that there was a mass of learning for me. I had been with technology business with Xerox Corporation for about ten years I had been in the medical device world for about a decade which I loved and then we were having some shifts and changes in our life and we decided that I would buy a snowmobile sleigh manufacturing company. Now in retrospect it was absolutely an idiot decision. Why would some—there were so many idiot decisions on this but anyway we did it. That was 1997, El Nino hit that winter there’s no snow. Most people don’t know this but the El Nino actually lasted for three years there’s no snow and I have a bit snowmobile sleigh manufacturing business. I was not happy. I was angry at my clients because they weren’t purchasing things. I was angry at my husband because he was the one who had kind of persuaded me that this would be a good idea and I was angry at God he’s the  one who makes it snow, right? 

 

As I was working with this I had a mentor who just really pushed in and said, Danita you’re playing the blame game and you are sapping your own creativity and energy and you need to shape up. Of course, I did not like that conversation I think I walked away angry from that conversation also. However, I guess I begin to process that and work with that I thought, okay, I’ve been sitting with this company that I hate for three years I’m just got to sit down and do a white boarding session and see what ideas I came up with. So, my husband and I sat down we came up with ten ideas. One idea was to sell the company and I thought that’s great because I don’t want to expand the company I want to sell it I hate it. We did everything we put all the paperwork together got the word on the street we had it sold in 45 days. And I sat and complained for three years and we sold it in 45 days? It was just a huge, huge lesson for me. Out of the experience and research developed a concept which I call the catalyst question. And there’s four things that I had to learn, one is, I can’t point the finger at anybody else I have to look at me. What might I do to get the results I want? And then number two is they use the word might. Might is a creativity question, so that’s what helped me to generate my options. What might I do, this is not about complaining this is about doing to get the results that I want? So that’s a key question that as I’m working with leaders that we start to integrate because lack of accountability is a massive eroder in our culture. 

 

Jim Rembach:     And that word has always kind of played a little bit of an irritation for me. Because for me I need to hold myself accountable. But I as a leader I need to create the environment by which people take ownership as well as convey that as an expectation because I think lazy leaders use accountability in the wrong way and they say, I’m going to hold you accountable and it becomes a control issue and I think it’s just totally misapplied in so many different ways. 

 

Danita Bye:    what a lazy leader will do. In my work with sales organizations we have actually researched over a million salespeople sales professionals and our statistics show that 60% of people within sales or the revenue generation side of a business have a tendency to point their fingers at someone else for not achieving an objective. They’re going to blame the economy they’re going to blame the competitor they’re going to blame the boss they’re going to blame the marketing department they’re going to blame someone and yes there are realities that we deal with. The reality is that if we will begin to look at what we might be able to do differently that kind of stimulates our own creative juices and helps us to reach out to the right people it helps us to ask a better set of questions. Again that’s an area where we as leaders we don’t hold people accountable we help to develop that culture of ownership.

 

Jim Rembach:     I really like the book and I highly recommend it and we’re going to actually put it on your show notes page. So for me when I start thinking about where you’re going with this and how things are progressing and you look at all these goals that you can have for your business and everything else what is one of those goals? 

 

Danita Bye:     Well, one of the goals is the message. The message of—get activated get engaged in coaching and mentoring. We baby boomers across the nation are retiring at record speed and many of them are at this time of searching for purpose. Some are afraid to retire because they don’t know what they’re going to be doing others are wrestling with feelings of relevance or it could be a really confusing time. One of my messages is that everything that you’ve been doing in life is preparing you to pass your leadership insight and wisdom and legacy on to the next generation. And I believe that this generation is calling out to us as senior leaders and that we as senior leaders need to respond and recognize that that that is a huge leadership legacy and responsibility that we can step up to. 

 

Jim Rembach:        And the Fast Leader legion wishes you the very best. Now before we move on let’s get a quick word from our sponsor.

 

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Jim Rembach:        Alright here we go Fast Leader legion it’s time for the Hump Day Hoedown. Okay, Danita, the Hump Day Hoedown is the part of our show where you give us good insights fast. I’m going to ask you several questions and your job is to give us a robust yet rapid response that are going to help us move onward and upward faster. Danita Bye, are you ready to hoedown? 

 

Danita Bye:    I think so, I don’t know. 

 

Jim Rembach:     What do you think is holding you back from being an even better leader today?

 

Danita Bye:    Focus. 

 

Jim Rembach:     What is the best leadership advice you have ever received? 

 

Danita Bye:    Listen and ask more questions. 

 

Jim Rembach:     What is one of your secrets that you believe contributes to your success?

 

Danita Bye:    Prosperity mindset don’t let excuses get in your way of making it happen. 

 

Jim Rembach:     What do you feel is one of your best tools that helps you lead in business or life?

 

Danita Bye:    One of my best tools it’s called a life map. And it outlines my goals and three areas of my life and I go back to that on a monthly basis just to recalibrate and make certain I’m on track. 

 

Jim Rembach:     What would be one book that you’d recommend to our listeners that could be from any genre? Of course we’re got to put a link to Millennials Matter, on your show page as well. 

 

Danita Bye:    Yes, the book that we need to read is the Bible and specifically Jesus. Jesus is this phenomenal leader that we can learn a lot from.

 

Jim Rembach:     Okay, Fast Leader legion you can find links to that another bonus information from today’s show by going to fastleader.net/danitabye. Okay, Danita, this is my last Hump Day Hoedown question: Imagine you were given the opportunity to go back to the age of 25 and you’ve been given the opportunity to take the knowledge and skills that you have now back with you but you can’t take everything back you can only choose one. So what skill or piece of knowledge would you take back with you and why?

 

Danita Bye:    It’s the ability to ask insightful deep questions so that you can also listen well. The reason behind that is one of my assets in life is to talk but the problem is we don’t learn we don’t serve we don’t love by talking everything we want comes from listening and caring about the people in our lives. 

 

Jim Rembach:     Danita, it was an honor to spend time with you today, can you please share with the Fast Leader legion how they can connect with you?

 

Danita Bye:    I am at danitabye.com 

 

Jim Rembach:     Danita Bye, thank you for sharing your knowledge and wisdom the Fast Leader legion honors you and thanks you for helping us get over the hump. Woot! Woot!

 

Thank you for joining me on the Fast Leader show today. For recaps, links from every show special offers and access to download and subscribe, if you haven’t already, head on over the fastleader.net so we can help you move onward and upward faster. 

 

END OF AUDIO 

 

[/expand]

 

091: Wade Fransson: This is not the tent

Wade Fransson Show Notes

Wade Fransson was a junior in High School and spent ten months living in a tent through the Alaskan winter. Having to endure the cold winter by using a portable stove served to be too much for Wade when the stove blew up in his face. Listen to Wade tell his story of surviving and making a greater impact.

While most of us were born and raised somewhere, Wade Fransson struggles with how to answer this question. Born in Vancouver Canada, by the time he was 9 he had lived in three countries, and attended three different schools in California, Washington State and Sweden. This is a result of Wade’s unique background, which includes divorce, a domestic kidnapping, in which his father smuggled him out of the country, and an international legal battle which was eventually decided by the Supreme Court of Sweden.

All this, and much more, is detailed in his first book, The People of the Sign. The book ends in 1995 with his resignation from the WorldWide Church of God, but Wade’s life was really just beginning. His first inclination was to pursue teaching, and he spent 18 months in fourth and fifth grade classrooms while pursing those credentials. As much as Wade loved working with the children, he came to realize that to support his family in the way he hoped he would be forced to pursue administrative roles that held no appeal to him.

So he established a successful business, which became a springboard into the corporate world, where he held significant roles in noteworthy companies, while pursuing an MBA. Along the way he has continued to struggle with the integration of his prior beliefs, his desire to practice true religion, as defined by helping those in need, and his desire for material success. This struggle, which is common to all of us in one way or another, is documented in the sequel to The People of the Sign, titled The Hardness of the Heart.

Wade leveraged the fruits of his experience as a successful corporate executive to build and manage a small Real Estate Investment portfolio and establish the Internet Startup GoHuman.com.  More recently he established Something or other Publishing (SOOP), a groundbreaking company that combines the potential of Social Media and Self-Publishing in their Author Driven Publishing model.

Beyond his job as a manager if IT strategic sourcing at Kohl’s Department stores, Wade is also the Board Chair for the Virtues Project, a global grassroots movement working to integrate virtues unto all aspects of life.

Wade now lives in Madison, Wisconsin with his wife and two children, where he has successfully resisted all attempts to force him to add a dog to the family. But he confesses that it is “likely only a matter of time.”

Tweetable Quotes and Mentions

Listen to @wfransson and get over the hump on the @FastLeaderShow Click to Tweet

“Understand where the other person is at so you can convey your ideas.” -Wade Fransson Click to Tweet

“With people at odds against each other, do you think we could have positive progress?” -Wade Fransson Click to Tweet

“Find some common ground or point of understanding to move forward.” -Wade Fransson Click to Tweet 

“I try to build trust so that I become their ally rather than their enemy.” -Wade Fransson Click to Tweet 

“My difficult negotiations are not with the other side, it’s with those internally.” -Wade Fransson Click to Tweet 

“Science and religion can be integrated.” -Wade Fransson Click to Tweet 

“Man became the most invasive species when it learned certain aspects of cooperation.” -Wade Fransson Click to Tweet 

“To get people to broaden their worldview you have to understand where they’re coming from.” -Wade Fransson Click to Tweet 

“My job is to create a competitive advantage with greater flow of value.” -Wade Fransson Click to Tweet 

“Every time I do a deal I’m thinking competitive advantage.” -Wade Fransson Click to Tweet 

“You take truthfulness and love and you’ve pretty much got it all wrapped up.” -Wade Fransson Click to Tweet 

“My goal is to leave the world in a better place than I found it.” -Wade Fransson Click to Tweet 

“There’s no better way to work on yourself than through the act of helping others.” -Wade Fransson Click to Tweet 

“You really need to have a clear vision and establish the right culture to succeed.” -Wade Fransson Click to Tweet 

“What is the real underlying issue, not the superficial answers?” -Wade Fransson Click to Tweet 

“We cannot achieve a fraction of what we could achieve through our own efforts.” -Wade Fransson Click to Tweet 

“Humility is what will enable other people to work with you.” -Wade Fransson Click to Tweet 

Hump to Get Over

Wade Fransson was a junior in High School and spent ten months living in a tent through the Alaskan winter. Having to endure the cold winter by using a portable stove served to be too much for Wade when the stove blew up in his face. Listen to Wade tell his story of surviving and making a greater impact.

Advice for others

It’s not a dog eat dog world.

Holding him back from being an even better leader

Struggling with baggage and its effect on interpersonal relationships. Working on stability and balance within myself.

Best Leadership Advice Received

It’s all about vision and setting the right culture.

Secret to Success

An analytical mind and unpacking a problem and getting to the core of the problem.

Best tools that helps in business or Life

The technical skills to learn and use tools better than most people.

Recommended Reading

Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

The Biology of Belief 10th Anniversary Edition: Unleashing the Power of Consciousness, Matter & Miracles

Contacting Wade

Website: http://wadefransson.com/

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/wadefransson

Twitter: https://twitter.com/wfransson

Resources

The People of the Sign
The Hardness of the Heart

 

Show Transcript: 

[expand title=”Click to access edited transcript”]

091: Wade Fransson: This is not the tent

Intro: Welcome to the Fast Leader Podcast, where we explore convenient yet effective shortcuts that will help you get ahead and move forward faster by becoming a better leader. And now here’s your host, customer and employee engagement expert and certified emotional intelligence practitioner, Jim Rembach.

 

Need a powerful and entertaining way to ignite your next conference, retreat or team-building session? My keynote don’t include magic but they do have the power to help your attendees take a leap forward by putting emotional intelligence into their employee engagement, customer engagement and customer centric leadership practices. So bring the infotainment creativity the Fast Leader show to your next event and I’ll help your attendees get over the hump now. Go to beyondmorale.com/speaking to learn more.

 

Okay Fast Leader legion, today, this episode has been in the making for a long time I’m glad we’re finally having it. The person I have on this episode today is one of those folks that the more I get to know about them the more fascinated that I am and the more that they impact my life. While most as were born and raise somewhere, Wade Fransson struggles with how to answer this question. Born in Vancouver, Canada by the time he was nine he had lived in three countries and attended three different schools in California, Washington State and Sweden. This is the result of Wade’s unique background which includes divorce, a domestic kidnapping in which his father smuggled him out of the country and an international legal battle which was eventually decided by the Supreme Court of Sweden. All this and much more is detailed in his first book, The People of the Sign. The book ends in 1995 with the resignation from the World Wide Church of God, but Wade’s life was really just beginning.

 

His first inclination was to pursue teaching and he spent 18 months and fourth and fifth grade classes while pursuing those credentials. As much as Wade loved working with the children, he came to realize that to support his family in the way that he hoped, he would be forced to pursue administrative roles that held no appeal to him. So, he established a successful business which became a springboard into the corporate world where he held significant roles in noteworthy companies while pursuing an MBA. Along the way he has continued to struggle with the integration of his prior beliefs, his desire to practice true religion as defined by helping those in need and his desire for material success. The struggle which is common to all of us in one way or another is documented in the sequel to The People of the Sign, titled The Hardiness of the Heart.

 

Wade leverage the fruits of his experience as a successful corporate executive to build and manage a small real estate investment portfolio and establish the Internet start-up gohuman.com More recently he established something or other publishing soup a groundbreaking company that combines the potential of social media and self-publishing in their author driven publishing model. Beyond his job as a manager of IT strategic sourcing at Cole’s Department store’s, Wade is also the Board Chair of the Virtues Project, a global grassroots movement working to integrate virtues into all aspects of life. Wade now lives in Madison, Wisconsin with his wife and two children where he had successfully resisted all attempts to force them to add a dog to the family but he confesses that is likely only a matter of time. Wade Fransson are you ready to help us get over the hump?

 

Wade Fransson:    Absolutely, Jim, thank you so much for having me on this program. I’m really looking forward to it.

 

Jim Rembach:    And I am too. I’m glad to your finally here. I’ve given our listeners a little bit about you but can you tell us which are current passion is so that we get to know you even better? 

 

Wade Fransson:    My current passion really relies on all of those experiences that you just listed out and trying to integrate them, as I think you hinted at it into a coherent vision and view for humanity in which people can self-actualize in a way that contributes to overall society as well as striving more transcendent goals including spiritual goals that are often neglected in our westerns society and integrates all these things as you pointed out is actually quite challenging.

 

Jim Rembach:    Thanks for sharing that. You’re talking about the challenging piece and even for me getting to know you more over the past couple of years now, is that, being able to think creatively in that way and convey it in a manner by which it doesn’t cause people to go “huh” is difficult. So, how do you actually make or as I may say it makes sense to you, how do you help others make sense of what you’re thinking and the vision that you have so that things move forward and people just don’t get confused?

 

Wade Fransson:    The hardest part there is really understanding where that other person is at. And getting to understand what it is that they’re looking at and how they might be able to understand some of the things that you wish to convey to them. If you’re talking this broad kind of integrated approach, it does somebody have a belief in a higher power or not and somebody believes that money and wealth are evil, or somebody believes that the biggest problem on the planet is global warming or does somebody believe that the biggest problem planet is the lack of energy. Understanding where people are coming from is the first most important point in order to build a bridge to help them understand what it is that you wished to convey to them. 

 

Jim Rembach:    You know that’s a very interesting concept that you’re talking about. And while I do spend a lot of time and effort both in my job as well as personally trying to craft messages that other people need to hear, now what I need to say there’s a difference there, not what I need to say but what other people need to hear. And the way that you just very quickly were able to identify where people are coming from, to me in itself is quite unique. I know for me I would use some of that for my own benefit, thank you for sharing. To be able to draw and create that connection with folks more rapidly so that hopefully we can get to doing things faster, we’re talking about moving onward and upward faster with the fast leader show.

 

Wade Fransson:    Look at one of the biggest challenges facing this nation and as the historical leader of the free world thus facing the entire world is the enormous and unbelievable polarization that’s happening in this country as typified by this year’s election cycle. Now with people that much at odds against each other, do you think we can have any positive progress in the world? Absolutely not. People are no willing to take each other down at any and all costs and it’s quite challenging then to be able to address people on both sides and not be painted black or white by either side in such a way that you could help them find some common ground, some point of understanding, in which we could forward on any topic or as a people or as a nation or on whatever it is that you wish to discuss. 

 

Jim Rembach:    That’s a very interesting point that you share. Let’s talk a little bit about some of the work that you do at Cole’s from a strategic sourcing perspective ‘cause I think it’s important in a lot of different ways to tour audience. A lot of the folks that listen to the show may have to go through a by-process in order to get solutions. And so that they have to build business cases. They have to present their ideas and try to get all of those things, so they have to coordinate a cross-multiple departments. They’re all ultimately trying to impact customer experience and make more sales, build their brands all those types of things. Now, when you start talking about the vast—just ideas and thoughts of all the things that you’re involved in—that’s one issue. But in order to move things forward and work across all these different departments and talk about strategic sourcing for such a huge organization for me I have to deal procurement people, right? And they have no the reputation of being….

 

Wade Fransson:    My condolences.

 

Jim Rembach:    Well, yeah, giving  me some empathy for that is appreciated. But how do you bring those two sides together where you got your internal stakeholders and that external vendor to get to the point where you can find an agreement? 

 

Wade Fransson:    That’s a fascinating question and one reason that I love what I call “my day job.” First of all why do it? Well, it pays the bills and it funds my other activities. Because I’m quite well compensated given that I am often negotiating deals in north of a hundred million dollars and you can imagine the dynamics in deals that large. So, I frequently get told by the people on the other side of the table that they’ve never met anybody like me in the procurement world, which I take as compliment. And that what I try to do is first and foremost build trust with them that I become their friend and ally rather than their enemy. The reasons that’s really challenging is because my own side doesn’t want that they want me to return every time with him blood on my knuckles and a few scalps showing them what I’ve done for them. And if I comeback with work pays on they’re going to say, “What the heck are you doing? You’re off the reservation here you should be fighting for us not chumming it with this guys, they’re not your friends.” And within our company, I’m likely in trouble for saying this but there’s this view that says, we should approach them as not our friends and you must fight and win, kind of thing. 

 

And I keep trying to tell my internal stakeholders, “No, that’s not how I get what Cole’s needs.” I don’t mind sharing this, I share this with the people that I work with on the other side table I’m trying to coach you out on a limb and then hold up the saw. I much rather get you to extend yourself way beyond what you would normally do in trust that I’m going to help you, and how do I do that? Again getting back to that PowerPoint I first say, “What it is that’s important to you in this?” Oftentimes something is very important to them that cost us almost nothing to give them and we can exchange that, that’s a really, really good horse trade, but oftentimes my side is like, “why should we give that to them” because this is antagonistic relationship like, “why shouldn’t we give it to them? Don’t you want a long-term strategic partnership with his company that you’re outsourcing $112 million worth of business to? Of course you do”. My difficult negotiations are not with those on the other side of the table, my difficult negotiations are with those internally to get—the person I’m supposed to be fighting with what they want. 

 

Jim Rembach:    That’s very enlightening in a lot of ways. I used to work for a large retailer. And I had the opportunity to spend some time in the in the buying department of different product lines that we sold within our stores. I had the experience of just witnessing some conversations from buyers that was just so nasty, where it was, give me everything and you’ll be left with nothing, and for my perspective we been taught as kids—you get more by being kind and nice and offering the candy and not being no ugly and nasty. How does that change?

 

Wade Fransson:    It gets to the heart and core of what I call the reptilian brainstem despite light syndrome that’s hardwired into our DNA. But again my interests are broad so I recently read in scientific American an article about man as a species becoming the most invasive species the planet has ever known and I tie there things in with my spiritual understanding going back to the book of Genesis and understanding how does this tie in with the Adam and Eve story which most consider just a fable that has no basis in any kind of fact. And I actually find ways to integrate this very divergent views, science and religion can be integrated, can be understood as united. So, anyway, man becoming the most invasive species, lo and behold man became the most invasive species when it learned certain aspects of cooperation. And this is in evidence in hunting facts whether the wolves or the orca whales that managed to excel as a species because they’ve learned certain elements of cooperation. You know, we often hear about dog eat dog but in nature dogs don’t actually eat dogs and yet that is fundamentally a world view that we have, oh, it’s a dog eat dog world. Really? In what sense has it ever been a dog eat dog world? When in history has a dog ever eaten a dog? And yet that idea influences our thinking and our actions in so many ways, it’s just insane. And yet that’s trying to coach somebody else out on a limb away from their minds and in their thinking to get them to broaden their world. You have to understand where they’re coming from and what silly, or ridiculous, or insane ideas occupied their thinking. And try to help create a crack and little light in on that. 

 

Jim Rembach:    Thanks for sharing that. As you were talking I even start thinking about my experiences with customer service just the other day for example. I see the connection, hopefully others will, is that I receive an offer via e-mail about receiving in a subscription that I have for some backup software an extra month of I signed up and I went through the process and for whatever reason the transaction didn’t go through, never got a notice of it otherwise but then I kept getting an expiration notice. And so I called them up and said, “What happened? As far as I know I paid for this.” And they said, “Oh, we see that the transaction didn’t go through, we can explain why.” And I said, well—she goes, but I’ll do it for you now. I said, “Okay.” So, then she started giving me the offer without the free month. And I said, “Wait a minute, I got an offer for a free month.” And she goes, “Well, go back through and click that e-mail” When I did it said, “This link is expired.” And I said, “Can you just go ahead and give me that….hold on one moment I need to get the supervisor’s approval.” Why did I have to spend an extra couple minutes and then you spend in the supervisor’s time just to give me one darn extra month which I already have an e-mail we confirm but it goes back to what we’re talking about is doggy dog, I’m giving you this—it’s policy—and it’s amazing what we’ve done to one another just from a customer service and customer care world with that type of thought process and mindset. 

 

Wade Fransson:    In going back again to how these things are integrated. So, I’ve created a model which I would love to publish sometime if I ever have the time to write a book about procurement and sourcing and doing deals and negotiations. I view the service provider network, the vendors those partners as a different species. They’ve grown up in a different ecosystem. They’re successful, we want to do business with them and because they’re successful they’re one of the best companies, we love them, whatever is it they’ve created, whatever value they have, they hold out for us. But they’ve developed that in a slightly different ecosystem, they are different species. And we as the customer we’re successful in our world they want to do business with us but we’re different species. So here are these barriers even at the cellular level a single celled mechanism has a semi-permeable membrane through which things come in and out of the organism. And the between DNA and RNA is critical and important that there’s a book of biology of belief that would claim this that will blow your mind and change your opinion about what you are genetically capable of or not capable of and the power of your thinking and choice to re-create yourself into something much grander.

 

Anyway, that semi-permeable membrane so Lex what it leds in or leds out and this single cell then develops and become the species that’s selectively protects itself the flight light syndrome hardwired into our DNA. We can override that and we can form a relationship in which we move the friction between the flow of value between these two species and now two species that essentially would be competing with each other and would be protecting themselves and defensive and trying to win it can suddenly become symbiotic and the flow of value can be much faster. So what I tell the vendors typically is at some point in the negotiation here’s my goal, you currently have our competitors as your customer, my job is to create a competitive advantage in that, I don’t care what your relationship is with our competitor you can have it because I’m going to create something that exceeds that the full value between you and us will exceed the flow of value between you and our competition based on this agreement that we’re going to reach, contract that we’re going to put in place to document it and that every time I do a deal I’m thinking competitive advantage, competitive advantage, my relation with IBM, my relationship with Microsoft, my relationship with Google is better, stronger, faster than their relationship with any of my competitors. So, in my little piece of the cold world in my little procurement role, I’m aligned with the top line vision of the company and I’m helping us achieve the competitive advantage and that what excites me about going into work every day. And it integrates with my thinking around, how can I be better human being, how can I have better friendships with people, and relationship with people, so that’s who and what I am and that’s how I roll, for better or worse.

 

Jim Rembach:    It’s definitely a unique situation when you talk about somebody who’s in a procurement world and I think anybody who’s ever dealt with procurement will see that. Your diverse background and a lot of the things that you had exposure to, your own continued effort to try to find this connection both spiritually and physically, there’s going to be so much inspirations that you have and we like to share quotes on the show, is there one that just stands out for you that you can share?

 

Wade Fransson:    There’s so many but I’m going to share two.  The first one is related to my role as chairperson of the Virtues Project international Association, this global grassroots movement that was endorsed by the United Nations and that has curriculum that’s being used in school systems in a variety of countries. And one of the quotes related to that that I love is by a man named `Abdu’l-Bahá, whom some may know, I’m actually a Bahai religiously today and `Abdu’l-Bahá is known as the master or the exemplar, the perfect example of following the teachings. 

 

His code is “Truthfulness is the foundation of all human virtues” and this of course integrates with this, “Search for truth, being truthful in your discussions with anybody else.” So, truthfulness is the foundation of all human virtues. And as a former Christian minister and one who believes that Jesus Christ is everything he said he was, everything that he revealed about himself is absolutely true, people just don’t know what that was, I don’t understand what that was, but he said, “To be a follower of Christ, the sign of somebody who actually follows Christ is quite simple, John 13:35, “By this shall all men know you that you have love one for another.” So you want to find people who are truly following Christ it’s people who exemplify love to each other. So you take truthfulness and love and you’re pretty much guided all wrapped up. 

 

Jim Rembach:    Simple plain truth. Alright, I know that there’s so many different fascinating stories like I had said is more I get to know you there’s more that I learn—I think people would make that reference about peeling back the onion I think you have unlimited layers. We all’ve had to get over humps, you went over several even as a child when you had not had no control over any of that, is there one that can stands out to you that’s really made that huge impact that you can share? 

 

There is absolutely. So, the moment that I’ve repeated to myself in difficult situations is, “This is not it is not the tent.” And what that means to me is, when I was at junior in high school after all these really traumatic situations that I was all emotionally wrapped around the axle because of what it occurred, what had been done to me the fact that authorities had lied to me and manipulated me and there was nobody I could trust. And then between my Junior and Senior of high school my dad decided he’s going to build a house on a piece of land where there was no water or electricity and unfortunately this land was in Alaska so I ended up living it a tent for 10 months through the Alaskan winter in 20 below weather. 

 

And going to school, I had, Jim, class first thing in the morning and I would try to get a shower. I’d come out and my clothes would stink and smell like smoke, I was tent boy at school in addition to having to survive living in a tent. While in that tent, I have this stove that I try to use to heat up the tent, of course you would go out in the middle of the night so it help and it didn’t help. And I had that stove blow up in my face and it burn off an entire layer of skin, which was not only excruciating it was terrifying and then I went into hypothermia as result of this and blah, blah, blah. So, that was an absolute low point. So, from time to time in my life I’ve said this is not a tent, I would get through this. 

 

Jim Rembach:    Wow, great story. And I think we all can relate to that in one way or the other. Now, we talked about many of the things that you’re involved in, from the self-publishing platform to of course working at Coles, being a father, your faith and also the Virtues Project, you’ve got tons of things. So, I still can understand how you get things to move forward, but that’s yet for another show. But if you start looking at a lot of these things, even maybe that we haven’t covered yet, what one of your goals? 

 

Wade Fransson:    My goal is to absolutely leave the world a better place than I found it. In all my interactions and everything I do and yeah it does absolutely focus on my children. My daughter is now eight and I looked at her the other day and I realized this is the age of my little sister when we came back from Sweden. And my little sister had forgotten English completely. When we were smuggled out of the country, we were split up to live with three sets of aunts and uncles. And we were totally immersed in Swedish society and we lost all sense of who our family was. And when we were reunited with our mother, my little sister can communicate with her because my mother can speak Swedish and Lisa didn’t speak English at that time. And mother was also an alcoholic at that time and so that made it even worse. 

 

So, looking at my daughter at age eight I’m thinking the investment that I’m making in my children, and I was on the school board for three years as well as on Montessori school where they go and totally sold on that program as far as an educational platform for people. Knowing that my children have just so much more of a foundation than I had and yeah, you can survive that tent and that stove blowing up in your face. But you’re scarred in a number of ways. And you have so much baggage and you can spend your whole life just working on yourself to get yourself to a place where you can be healthy and survive and much of my life were spent getting to place where I can be healthy and survive. But I’m hopeful that my children will have all that dial by the time they hit adolescence, they’ll already be out serving community in ways that it took me four years to figure out how to serve humanity. My desire was to serve humanity but in the typical social workers syndrome often the people doing social work have more problems than the people they are trying to help. I hate to say that as a sort of a blanket characterization, but it’s true. It’s not a c criticism of them, I admire and applaud them for working on themselves through the act of helping others, there’s no better way to work on yourself. But imagine if you start from a position of strength rather than one of weakness with the right intent, how much more you can actually (25:08 inaudible)

 

Jim Rembach:    And the Fast Leader legion wishes you the very best. Now before we move on let’s get a quick word from our sponsor.

 

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Alright here we go Fast Leader listeners, it’s time for the Hump Day Hoedown. Okay, Wade, the Hump Day Hoedown is the part of our show where you give us good insights fast. So I’m going to ask you several questions and your job is to give us robust yet rapid responses that are going to help us move onward and upward faster. Wade Fransson, are you ready to hoedown?

 

Wade Fransson:    I am ready.

 

Jim Rembach:    Alright.  What do you think is holding you back from being an even better leader today?

 

Wade Fransson:    I still struggle with all that baggage and interpersonal relationships, still catch myself acting in ways that I’m not proud of based on not having really gotten stability and balance within myself.

 

Jim Rembach:    What is the best leadership advice you have ever received?

 

Wade Fransson:    That’s a tough one.  I think in terms of leadership, it’s all about vision. It’s all about setting the culture. You really need to have a clear vision and establish the right culture to succeed. 

 

Jim Rembach:    What is one of your secrets that you believe contributes to your success. 

 

Wade Fransson:    An analytical mind. Just unpacking of problem asking why five times and getting to the bottom of what is the real underlying issue here.  Now taking superficial answers not dealing with symptoms, getting to the core of the problem. 

 

Jim Rembach:    What do you feel is one of your best tools that helps you lead in business or life?

 

Wade Fransson:    This isn’t exactly the tool but it’s an example of the tool. When I was in high school I learn how to type and what I mean by that is it’s a technical skill, I type 81 words a minute and when I learned to use Microsoft Word or Microsoft Excel really learning to use a tool really well. How do I accomplish things across all of these methods? I know how to use the tools to get things done in a fraction of the time that it takes other people to get them done. 

 

Jim Rembach:    What would be one book that you’d recommend to our listeners, they could be from any genre?

 

Wade Fransson:    Well, mine of course, but other than that, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance was a seminal book for me that helped educate me on philosophy, human relations, and just was a fascinating read. I tried to pattern my book a little bit—my first book a little bit on the model of the way that Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance is written. It’s not what you think from the title, amazing book.

 

Jim Rembach:    Okay, Fast Leader listeners you’ll find links to that and bonus information from today show by going to fastleader.net/wadefransson and will put links to Wade’s books as well. Okay, Wade, this is my last Hump Day Hoedown question: Imagine you were given the opportunity to go back to the age of 25 and you’ve been given the opportunity to take the knowledge and skills that you have now back with you but you can’t take everything back you can only choose one, what skill or piece of knowledge would you take back with you and why? 

 

Wade Fransson:    Humility. I would take humility because we cannot possibly achieve even a fraction of what we could achieve through our own efforts, and humility is what will enable other people to want to work with you. 

 

Jim Rembach:    Wade is was an honor to spend time with you today. Can you please share with the Fast Leader Legion how they can connect with you? 

Wade Fransson:    Sure. Wade Fransson I’m the only Wade Fransson know to Google, my name doesn’t sound that unique but it is. So just Google me and any site will come up, my books, my website, wadefransson.com, probably my publishing company. You can also just get me at wade@soopllc.com.

 

Jim Rembach:    Wade Fransson, thank you for sharing her knowledge and wisdom the Fast Leader Legion honors you and thanks you for helping us get over the hump. Woot! Woot!

 

Thank you for joining me on the Fast Leader show today. For recaps, links from every show, special offers and access to download and subscribe, if you haven’t already, head on over the fastleader.net so we can help you move onward and upward faster. 

 

END OF AUDIO

 

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