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Mary Lippitt | Situational Mindsets

253: Mary Lippitt: Target what matters when it matters

Mary Lippitt Show Notes Page

Mary Lippitt was trying to influence her bosses and was rejected. When she was able to finally meet with the top executive, she realized she needed to open her mind and to recognize that her facts contained many gaps and she needed to adjust her thinking.

Dr. Mary Lippitt’s early years were spent in New Haven, CT; Lincoln, NE; Schenectady NY; Arlington VA; Paris, France; and Bethesda MD.  As the daughter of a minister, she moved frequently. These experiences showed her that despite outward differences, we share many commonalities. She formed a deep commitment to finding ways to bring people together and reduce the proclivity to stereotype or dismiss others since she did not like being labeled or pigeonholed.

As an adult, Mary has lived in Buffalo, NY, Bartlesville, OK, Miami Fl, Bethesda MD (again), and now in Tampa Bay, Fl. And over the years, she worked for county government, an international electronics firm, and as director of a university’s master of human resources program.

These divergent experiences helped her recognize there is a missing element in the way we develop our leaders. We traditionally focus on the internal aspects of an individual; their personal style, traits, and competencies. The context or outer realities are largely being overlooked.  Her distinctive work fills this gap by helping leaders critically analyze and address their complex and challenging issues.  In Mary’s book, Situational Mindsets: Targeting What Matters When It Matters, she offers a framework to build effectiveness, engagement, collaboration, that produce results.

Mary founded Enterprise Management Limited in 1984 and has served public, private, and non-profit clients interested in boosting critical thinking, the bottom line, and engagement. In the US, she has partnered with Bank of America, Lockheed Martin, Marriott, SAIC, the US Department of Energy, and the US Marine Corps.  She has also worked in Japan, Turkey, France, and Kuwait.

The role Mary enjoys the most is being a grandmother to her two grandsons, and she apologies to her daughter for making this statement. But grandparenthood has all the pleasures without any of the hassles of being a parent.

Mary currently lives in Tampa, Florida between her many travel adventures.

Tweetable Quotes and Mentions

Listen to @marylippitt to get over the hump on the @FastLeaderShowClick to Tweet 

“You could deliver results and still care about people.” Click to Tweet 

“Kindness and results are not exclusive to each other; you could do both.” Click to Tweet  

“The success rate of change is dismal because the change agents don’t listen.” Click to Tweet  

“A mindset is a temporary point of view; it is not genetic or a personal style.” Click to Tweet  

“When I focus, I can achieve something.” Click to Tweet  

“If I keep trying to juggle six things, I’ll make very poor decisions.” Click to Tweet  

“Change is probable, pervasive, problematic, and promising.” Click to Tweet  

“Change is where we’re going to have new opportunities, but we may not like the process of having to go through that change.” Click to Tweet  

“By the time I’m being forced I have fewer options. As long as I’m proactive I have more to choose from.” Click to Tweet  

“Leadership today is about asking the right questions, it’s not about having all the right answers.” Click to Tweet  

“No one has all the right answers, the world is too complex.” Click to Tweet  

“The focal point is important because that creates the common ground.” Click to Tweet  

“I realized, when you think differently from me you help me.” Click to Tweet  

“Instead of labeling somebody right or wrong, what can I learn.” Click to Tweet  

“I’m realizing I don’t have all the information, but I also realize no one does.” Click to Tweet  

“Our focal point of leadership has become a little too narrow.” Click to Tweet  

Hump to Get Over

Mary Lippitt was trying to influence her bosses and was rejected. When she was able to finally meet with the top executive, she realized she needed to open her mind and to recognize that her facts contained many gaps and she needed to adjust her thinking.

Advice for others

Learn to be able to say you do not know.

Holding her back from being an even better leader

I like to follow new ideas that sometimes I forget the priority of following through with my immediate goals.

Best Leadership Advice

Listen, persevere, and respect others.

Secret to Success

I’ve developed the ability to ask good questions.

Best tools in business or life

I use a situational mindset checklist.

Recommended Reading

Situational Mindsets: Targeting What Matters When it Matters

Thinking, Fast and Slow

The Art Of War

Contacting Mary Lippitt

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/marylippitt/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/marylippitt

Website: https://enterprisemgt.com/

Resources and Show Mentions

Call Center Coach

An Even Better Place to Work

Show Transcript:

[expand title=”Click to access edited transcript”]

253 Mary Lippitt episode

Jim Rembach: (00:00)

Okay. Fast leader Legion today. I’m excited because we have somebody on the show who is really going to give us some greater understandings and frameworks on how to be significantly more effective. Dr Mary lipids early years were spent in new Haven, Connecticut, Lincoln, Nebraska, Schenectady, New York, Arlington, Virginia, Paris, France in Bethesda, Maryland as the daughter of a minister. She moved frequently. These experiences showed her that despite outward differences, we share many commonalities. She formed a deep commitment to finding ways to bring people together and reduce the proclivity to stereotype or dismiss others since she did not like being labeled or pigeonholed herself as an adult. Mary has lived in Buffalo, New York, Bartletts bill, Oklahoma, Miami, Florida, Bethesda, Maryland, and now in Tampa, Florida. And over the years she worked for County government and international electronics firm and as a director of a university’s master of human resources program, these divergent experiences helped her recognize there is a missing element in the way that we develop our leaders.

 

Jim Rembach: (00:00)

nd as the daughter of a minister. She moved frequently. These experiences showed her that despite outward differences, we share many commonalities. She formed a deep commitment to finding ways to bring people together and reduce the proclivity to stereotype or dismiss others since she did not like being labeled or pigeonholed herself as an adult. Mary has lived in Buffalo, New York, Bartletts bill, Oklahoma, Miami, Florida, Bethesda, Maryland, and now in Tampa, Florida. And over the years she worked for County government and international electronics firm and as a director of a university’s master of human resources program, these divergent experiences helped her recognize there is a missing element in the way that we develop our leaders.

 

Jim Rembach: (01:07)

We traditionally focus on the internal aspects of an individual, their personal style or their traits and their competencies. The context or outer realities are largely being overlooked. Her distinctive work fills this gap by helping leaders critically analyze and address their complex and challenging issues in Mary’s book, situational mindsets targeting what matters when it matters. She offers a framework to build effectiveness, engagement, collaboration that produces results. Mary founded enterprise management limited in 1984 and has served public, private and nonprofit clients interested in boosting critical thinking and bottom line and engagement in the U S she has partnered with bank of America, Lockheed Martin, Marriott, S a I see the us department of energy and the U S Marine Corps. She has also worked in Japan, Turkey, France and Kuwait. The role Mary enjoys the most is bringing a grandmother to her grandsons and she apologizes to her daughter for making the statement, but grand Parenthood has all the pleasures without any of the hassles of being a parent. Mary currently lives in Tampa, Florida between her travel excursions, Mary lipid. Are you ready to help us get over the hump? Thank you. I’m really glad you’re here and I’m really excited to talk about this particular topic. But I think before we get into that, I think it’s extremely important for you to explain who is Kate Hollander?

 

Mary Lippitt: (02:33)

Kate Hollander is the new head of sales at a printing company in Denver. And she walks into a situation where her staff really would prefer that she would not be there because they would wanted her job. The sales are declining rapidly. There are silos between the organizations in the, uh, between, uh, sales production and she, the owner is a micromanager. So she has a lot or plate from the get go. And the story talks about how she’s resolves this by delivering results, but also at the same time by making sure that people are engaged and respect it. What I’m trying to show in this story of Kate is that you could deliver results and still care about people. You know, kindness and results are not exclusive to each other. You can do both. And that this is what Kate shows people how to deliver results, but to work well together

 

Jim Rembach: (03:38)

well, and to give this even more justice. What you did is really set a very important setting and how Kate actually goes about her work when you talk about her being a medic. So if you could explain that a little bit, I think that’s a really good foundational elements to kind of help give people some understanding and context when we get into this discussion about these situational mindsets.

 

Mary Lippitt: (04:02)

Okay. Kate had been in sales before for a medical device manufacturer, but after nine 11, she chose to serve in the military and serve as a medic. So she’s coming off of tours in the middle East and she’s accepted a job in an industry that she is not familiar with. And so she knows about sales, but her recent experience is really in middle East and being a medic rather than a sales person. So there’s a lot of discounting her, uh, stereotypes about, you know, what can she do for us and you know, she’s younger than we are and all sorts of other aspects. Cloud, uh, the initial impression of her, uh, what really happens is that there is actually the restaurant next to her, the printing business, there’s an explosion. And then they see her in action and they realize a couple of things. Not only is she very decisive, but she also, no one knows when to step back.

 

Mary Lippitt: (05:08)

She handles the triage effectively. She directs people clearly and with respect, no panic. But when the emergency medical people arrive, she knows to step back. So this is not someone who is really out to, to, to, to look like on the hero. Uh, she works well with others and people realize, well she goes have some skills, maybe she doesn’t know a lot about printing yet. And the, she has to balance a reality that the owner of the business is pushing her go, go, go, go. And she recognizes that the sales have been going down for a while. So it isn’t just a motivational thing. There really are some other aspects. So she uses her honeymoon period just to sit back and do some analysis of what it is that’s really happening. And in that process she recognizes that, that her staff is using a transactional approach, just get the sale and move on.

 

Mary Lippitt: (06:11)

And she knows that customer service, uh, as you would know, well, requires a lot more than that. And she talks to the team and helps them come up with a ability to tailor their interactions with their potential clients to make sure that they have a solid sale and one that survives the actual first, um, order to deliver additional orders. And, and this is really resisted at first because after all, she doesn’t know the printing business and, you know, why should we change? We would be doing it this way for so long. And so she actually takes a step back and instead of trying to, um, demand, um, compliance, she actually works with her staff. She goes on sales calls with them, she doesn’t try to upstage them and she shows very early, they sh that she is trying to help them because she’s identified what their major problems are within the organization and she tackles those right away to gain some early wins to build the confidence that she really is going to be someone that helps them.

 

Mary Lippitt: (07:21)

So there’s a lot going on that she’s trying to juggle. And I should mention that she got this job because the vice-president charge of operations for title’s vice president of sales was someone she worked with in the military. So he was her advocate and the owner was a little reluctant to hire. She didn’t have the Printy experience. And again, he was hit the deck running nose down to the grindstone kind of guy. And, and so this, um, strong recommendation is, is the reason that she got the job, but the welcome was a little bit lukewarm.

 

Jim Rembach: (07:56)

Well, but you also talk about that and everything that you described there and the competing forces associated with this. So there’s, you know, the situations of threat from outside, um, you know, all the marketplace, you know, pressures, you talk about the internal culture, uh, you talk about, you know, uh, people trying to silo, you know, uh, protect, I mean, all of these different factors that I think everybody can relate to in so many different ways. And, and so then you start explaining this whole really how you navigate all of this and how Kate navigates all this. And that is in the situational mindset model. So if you could talk about the, the six components or elements of the situational mindset model because of if you just take them by word, um, you could potentially be misled and I think you need to explain them a little bit.

 

Mary Lippitt: (08:43)

Okay. There, there are six mindsets. Let me just preface my comments by people say, Oh, there’s gotta be more than that. I will remind people that there are three primary colors and we get lots cubes. There are seven musical notes, so we get lots of melodies. So having six is not as outrageous as it may seem. So let me identify the six. The first is I call inventing. It is a focus on what are the new products we should consider, uh, what are the new technologies that we can apply? What are the synergies that we can create internally or externally? So this is a focus on making sure that you are offering the products that are state of the art. And we do know that, you know, certain companies really go out of their way to make sure that they are state of the art, you know, whether it’s an Apple or or whatever organization it is.

 

Mary Lippitt: (09:38)

Having that reputation really is a discriminating factor for many customers. So that’s the first one. The second one is very customer oriented, calling it the catalyzing mindset. And in this mindset we’re looking at who our key customers, how can we increase our customer base, how can retain our customers, how can we provide them with customer service? What are the emerging customer needs? So both the first two are very external to the organization. They’re looking at technology and new ideas. They’re looking at the customer, which is obviously external. And those are really what I would call the entrepreneurial stages, the small business getting started. And then there’s a shift from the external point of view to looking at the organization. And I know you’re very familiar with the fact that organizations can grow rapidly, but sometimes there’s a lot of chaos in that growth. And so the third mindset is called the developing mindset.

 

Mary Lippitt: (10:41)

And it takes a look at how should we be organized? Should we be functional matrix, geographic product, whatever. But it’s also establishing, you know, what are our policies? What’s our pay policy, what’s our, uh, our policy on promotions. It’s taking a look at what are the systems that we need? How is information going to flow? What are the decision making practices we have? So it’s what I’ll call a macro orientation to how we function. And this is the orientation that says let’s take a look at our goals and make sure that we’re doing the right thing rather than just doing things right. So that’s the third one. The fourth one is also internal look, but it’s more of a micro look. Then the infrastructure develop a mindset. We call that the performing mindset. And in this mindset, what we take a look at are things like process improvement, a quality improvement, workflow analysis, facility layout improvement, um, return on investment, meeting the budget, uh, vendor management, supply chain management, all of the, the, the adjustments, the tweaking, the polishing of a work flow.

 

Mary Lippitt: (11:57)

And of course, you know, that is where we get the efficiency. So this is a very efficiency but quality oriented mindset. So the, the fifth mindset is still internal, but it’s taking look at the people is taking a look. What is a talent we have? Do they have the right competencies? How do we retain them? Do we have good collaboration? Do we have engagement? Do we have a succession plan? Do we have an agile culture? Are we change ready? Uh, are we proud of ourselves or do we set, have a sense of commitment and loyalty. All of the without broadly call the people and culture aspects. And, and again, some people tend to discount this area and I would just like to remind people that Peter Drucker said, culture eats strategy for breakfast. So this although may not have the pazazz of a customer sale, uh, if you don’t keep your sales people, if you don’t have the right compensation system for them, if they’re not proud of your product, they will stay with you.

 

Mary Lippitt: (13:03)

And you call that the protecting mindset. Why protecting? Because it’s protecting what we’ve achieved in terms of our product, our customers, our infrastructure and our processes. So it’s protecting all that we’ve built so far. And this is a very proud, you know, stage. And in that every one of these stages has many advantages, but many also disadvantages. And what can happen with protecting is that I’m so proud of what I’ve got. I won’t change. You know, we’ve, we’ve perfected everything, don’t mess with success. And the sixth and final mindset is taking a look at the trends that we need to adjust to. It’s called the challenging mindset because it’s challenging what we’ve already established. And this is taking a look at new initiatives, new business opportunities that we may have. It takes a look at maybe new business models. And again, just talking about the printing industry for a second.

 

Mary Lippitt: (14:04)

You know, there was a time when people would say, no one, no one will ever buy a book without being able to go to a store, open the book and look at, you know, but nobody will buy the book. Um, and I will say that Amazon has such, uh, show them how false that assumption was. So the challenging mindset looks at business models changing the strategy, adapting the strategy. It also takes a look at what of some potential new partnerships that we should go after. What are the kinds of alliances we should make? You know, it’s taking a look at positioning the organization for the future. There’s a lovely quote from Mark Twain that, you know, if you’re on the right track, that’s great, but you just stay there, you’re going to get run over. And the challenging mindset is going to tell you this is, you know, an opportunity to continue to grow.

 

Mary Lippitt: (14:56)

We don’t have to throw the baby out with the bath water. What we really can do is take what we’ve done well expanded, prepare us. We have to be an organization that sustains itself. So those are the six. And again, three of them are internally focused. The developing, the performing and the protecting. And three of them are really externally focused. The challenging, which is looking at the trends, you know, what does the demographic difference mean for us? Uh, what does it mean? You know, that the interest rates are lower than we had anticipated. All those things have to be considered. So the challenging, the inventing and the catalyzing mindset look more externally. And what’s really interesting is most change agents are looking at challenging, inventing and catalyzing. And we know that the success rate of change is dismal. And that’s because the change agents get so excited about their idea that they don’t listen to the other mindsets that people have. And again, a mindset is a temporary point of view. It is not genetic, it is not a personal style. It say I’m going to do what I think is most important. And um, historically we had something called faster, cheaper and better and we would say, you know, do it faster and then it will obviously be cheaper. No, not necessarily. So this framework in the largest, that faster, cheaper, better into a more comprehensive analysis.

 

Jim Rembach: (16:25)

No, but I think you bring up a really interesting point, right? So it’s, I have these six elements and as you were explaining them, I started thinking about all these different subsets. So I’m like, okay, I’m an organization and it was all as you, if you, if you still even thinking about that from a champion perspective, they can’t focus on everything. It’s just not possible. The whole, you know, multitasking myth is, is quite true. While we have to do a lot of things, uh, it doesn’t mean that we can focus on a lot of things. So when you start talking about choosing and choosing, which mindset, how do you go about doing that?

 

Mary Lippitt: (16:57)

Well, the first thing is you have to do a comprehensive analysis of your situation. And the term, the title of the book is talking about mindset, which is a present orientation. What’s, what am I facing now? But instead of having it be your mindset about myself and my own capabilities, it’s doing an awareness of the actual situation that I’m confronting. And so I would love to do six things simultaneously, but, but I know that I can’t text and drive, so I have to become aware of my limitations. And that’s not a bad thing because when I focus, I can achieve something. If I keep trying to juggle six things, I’ll make very poor decisions. I haven’t really analyzed everything and I’ll come across as someone who is a chameleon. First she wants this, then she wants that kind of thing. So we have to make choices.

 

Mary Lippitt: (17:50)

But those choices are not permanent. I think people resisted a choice because they thought, okay, this is gonna be a five year plan or a 10 year plan and what we have now is the speed of change is coming so fast that we could do one priority to time complete it and move on to another. There was a lovely story about the fact that if you’re driving a car, you adjust your position, your hands, your eyes, every nine seconds and you know, this is the rate of change and change is probable, pervasive, problematic and promising. So you know, the change is where we’re going to have new opportunities that we may not like the process of having to go through that change, but we’re going to have to to be successful.

 

Jim Rembach: (18:40)

Well, and I think as you said that there’s one thing for me that I think is kind of stands out as that I would rather be proactive and rather it be voluntary than be forced.

 

Mary Lippitt: (18:49)

Yes. Because by the time I’m being forced, I have fewer options as long as I’m proactive, I have more to choose from.

 

Jim Rembach: (18:57)

Yeah. That’s funny that you say that. My daughter right now is a, uh, in high school and she’s a junior and I’m like, you need to start looking at schools. I said, because if you don’t do that, because she’s also an athlete, I said, you know, you have to start creating relationships that you surely should have already been building. If you want a roster spot, you know that it’s all about relationships these days. I mean, they, yes, they look at the athleticism and you know, athletic abilities, but they also want to make sure they’re finding the right cultural fit. It’s become so darn important. You’re, you’re going to be left with whatever the scraps are if you don’t get moving.

 

Mary Lippitt: (19:31)

And one of the things she should be considering is getting tapes of her in action. I mean, there are things that she could do now to help her, you know, identify the coaches that she might want to send information to, you know, and maybe even look at those where she can get on the roster and maybe also look at those where she could get a scholarship. So, I mean it looks like it’s far off to just somebody, but, but there are things we can do now to position ourselves well for the future.

 

Jim Rembach: (19:58)

That’s right. And that’s just exactly what we’re talking about as far as, you know, really being able to, okay, now I understand this framework, uh, and then I need to go about the choosing process, but I need to master this. I mean, because I need to be proactive with it. I cannot be reactive. I’m going to lose choices and options. I’m going to be the one being disrupted instead of being the disruptor. And so I have to master it. So now it’s a master. You talk about really two key key elements. There’s probably more if they are, please explain them. But you talk about focal points and guiding questions. Explain them.

 

Mary Lippitt: (20:30)

Well, I think I w w I would say is the guided questions are helping us identify all the information first. Because what happens is the, sometimes we have an idea but we don’t really test it out. Is this really the best option I have? So the questions become a checklist to make sure I’ve collected the data from everyone. And again, one of my assumptions is that leadership today is about asking the right questions. It’s not about having all the right answers cause no one has all the right answers. The world is too complex. So getting the questions surfaces the data so then I can evaluate it and set my priority or the focal point. But then I can also communicate that focal point by explaining exactly why this is the most important thing to tackle at this point in time.

 

Jim Rembach: (21:21)

Well I think the importance here too is that, okay, so I need to learn this framework. I need to have stir start working on mastering this framework because I do have to decide faster and I can’t just decide based off of what I’ve known or even what others are doing. Because if I look at these situations, um, there, there’s that unique DNA that starts actually revealing itself and that’s what I have to work with.

 

Mary Lippitt: (21:45)

Correct. I think the only thing I would say is that the, I have to keep reminding people that a mindset is a very temporary thing. So just to say it, it’s, you know, it’s, it’s fun following what the current priority or issue is, but it isn’t a permanent label of what I will always choose. Uh, you mentioned that I lived in Buffalo, New York and it’s in a, in a hurricane over in Florida or blizzard in Buffalo, New York. You don’t care what the background, whether somebody graduated from, uh, you know, in engineering or someone graduated in art. If they can help you get out of the storm, you say, thank you. So the focal point is important because that creates the common ground that creates the teamwork that makes things happen. And it could be a very temporary thing. I mean I can, if I’m in a blizzard and I, I can’t even open my car door cause it’s frozen and somebody tells me how to do it, you know, I’m thankful but I’ve learned it, I’ll move on. So I’m talking about a mindset is a very, very temporary assessment of what is most important to do. But that temporary assessment is going to help me set the priority, which means I can focus and achieve the results.

 

Jim Rembach: (23:05)

Yeah. We have to have that built in agility. Right. Okay. So you all off, you know, through our, our discussion here, um, used many different co quotes and those are absolutely focal points. You know, they point us in the right direction and we really, you know, look at those on the fast leader show and share them a lot. So is there one or two they’re all riddled throughout your book? You’ve mentioned a few, but it’s are kind of one or two that stand out for you as focal points.

 

Mary Lippitt: (23:31)

Well, I think there’s one from Ben Franklin. I like that. Just something like, Oh, if you stop, if you don’t think creatively you, it’s like giving up your, your, your future, your life. I it thinking is critical to our life and it gets a bad name, particularly the term critical thinking. Cause it sounds like I have to be a cynic or I have to be, you know, poking somebody in, putting up shortfalls. But really critical thinking, you know, it could be as subtle as, would you want me to investigate this aspect of this? You know, and people say yes. So you can be very comprehensive in your analysis without being, you know, a naysayer or a problem child kind of thing.

 

Jim Rembach: (24:19)

Now it’s interesting that you say that. I mean a lot of people may say, well it’s just semantics but it’s semantics are critically important. I’m sorry. I think give us context and they give us understanding. It’s like we’ve built a fide so many different words in our society that, you know, if we would have used them just a hundred years ago would have had a totally different, you know, context. I mean, I often refer to the one of ignorant and if you look it up, it just says innocent, unknowing. But yet if anything is labeled as ignorant, it is vilified. And that’s just, that’s just unfortunate. Now when we start talking about these, these transformations, these transitions, these learnings and all that stuff, I mean we talk about getting over the hump on the show. Um, and those personal stories of when we had those experiences can be so helpful for others. I just was telling my daughter the other day, I said, even though you may not want to hear my stories, you know, if you actually work to listen, seeing that we’re very similar in the way that we go about thinking, maybe you’ll gain some insight for yourself, you know, choose a better path. Of course she doesn’t want to hear that from dad. But, um, is there a time where you’ve gotten over the hump that you can share?

 

Mary Lippitt: (25:26)

Yes. Um, early in my career I thought rational analysis would always win the day. And I was trying to influence up, uh, the chain of command and I got rejected and I couldn’t believe it. I was dumbfounded. And it wasn’t until I got a task I was, we had a, this was a large organization, we had about 30,000 employees and I got tasked with writing the head executives monthly column to the employees. So I got to sit down and talk with him. And we saw things very differently as what was a priority and how we analyzed it was very different. Now if you’re writing the top executive, you got to adjust your thinking to his point of view. Obviously extra. I write something, he’s going to review it, he’s going to edit it. He would rather not have to edit it heavily. So I hadn’t, I had to start opening my own mind.

 

Mary Lippitt: (26:32)

I have to tell you, I was convinced sometimes that I had more answers than I really had and I thought I saw things more clearly than I really did. Um, there’s, there’s a comment, you know, what you see is not all there is. And I, that was my opening to begin to recognize I didn’t see everything and all the facts that I thought I had had many gaps but I’d never had collected them. So that exercise of writing for him really showed me how differently people fought. And again, we tend in our society to say, if you think differently from me, you’re wrong. And, um, what I realized was when you think differently from me, you helped me. You helped me, I benefit from these differences. And so instead of labeling somebody right or wrong, you know, what can I learn? How do they see reality?

 

Mary Lippitt: (27:31)

What am I missing? And you know, there’s lots of stories about, you know, witnesses to car accidents and you know, everybody saw the same accident but they recall different things. That’s what we have to recognize in our organizations. People are going to focus on different things. Some will get the right, so we’ll get the wrong, but we’ve got at least collect them before we can evaluate them. And that was how I started to realize there really was, um, great wisdom that I was missing. And so I really learned the importance of asking more questions rather than asking just a couple of, you know, jumping into my conclusions, which I was fairly sure I was right. Um, I mean this is basically the confirmation bias. I collected the information that supported my point of view. And sometimes I remind people that at one point in time bankers said you could give a 95% mortgage because home prices never go down more than 5%. That was a false assumption. And so I’m beginning to become maybe is more humble because I’m realizing I don’t have all the information, but I also realized that no one does. And so this is why we need to work together. And so I think we could work together to produce results. But we also, when we work together, we show respect for another person. We showed that we value them and we therefore engage them and we get the kind of collaboration and teamwork that makes our jobs very satisfying.

 

Jim Rembach: (29:03)

Well, the only way that it does that though, Mary, is because if we have, you know, very useful frameworks because otherwise all of that diversity and different perspectives are going to not enable us to move forward. And that’s why I’m really glad that you’ve actually shared these situational mindset models and everything else that goes with it. So when I start looking at that and looking at the, you know, where you’ve been in the work that you’ve done in the work that you’re still yet to do, when I start thinking about some of the goals you have, um, I’d like to hear one, what is one goal that you have?

 

Mary Lippitt: (29:37)

I would like to expand our definition of leadership to include making sure that we balance the short and the longterm and the ability to gain active support from others. I think that our focal point of leadership has become a little too narrow and I value everything we’ve done in the past. Um, just it, my uncle Ronald lipid with Kurt Loland did the very first leadership study in 1938 it was called the Lou and liquid white study and they came up with laissez Faire leadership and all that. And I really think everything that we’ve done in leadership has been fantastic, uh, whether it’s group dynamics, whether it’s emotional intelligence, whether it’s style, whatever else. But I think we’ve left out our situational ability to, to deliver, uh, the best for the organization. So I really would like to expand how we look at leadership

 

Jim Rembach: (30:43)

and this world of customer centric transformation. And you know, I’m a digital transformation and all of that. This type of leadership is really bottled to not just the success of an organization, but the existence of an organization and the fast leader Legion wishes you the very best. Now before we move on, let’s get a quick word from our sponsor. And even better place to work is an easy to use solution that gives you a continuous diagnostic on employee engagement along with integrated activities that will improve employee engagement and leadership skills in everyone using this award. Winning solutions, guaranteed to create motivated, productive, and loyal employees who have great work relationships with our colleagues and your customers. To learn more about an even better place to work, visit [inaudible] dot com for slash better. All right, here we go. Fast leader Legion. It’s time for the home. Oh now, okay Mary, the hump day. Hold on as a part of our show where you give us good insights fast. So I’m going to ask you several questions and your job is to be as give us robust yet rapid responses are going to help us move onward and upward faster. Mary rib lipid. Are you ready to hoedown all right, so what is holding you back from being an even better leader today?

 

Mary Lippitt: (31:55)

I like to so much to look at new ideas, but sometimes I forget the priority of following through with my immediate goal so I can become distracted and I need to re remember it again. What is my priority today?

 

Jim Rembach: (32:14)

What is the best leadership advice you have ever received?

 

Mary Lippitt: (32:18)

Listen, persevere and respect others.

 

Jim Rembach: (32:24)

What do you believe is one of your secrets that helps you contribute to your success?

 

Mary Lippitt: (32:29)

I think I’ve developed the ability to ask good questions.

 

Jim Rembach: (32:33)

And what is one of your tools that helps you lead in business or life?

 

Mary Lippitt: (32:38)

I a situational mindset checklist. It’s a basically reminding me what questions I need to ask and those questions can be tailored to the level of the organization or the type of industry. So that really helps me. And I know that some people discount the, the, the importance of a checklist, but I’ll say lawyers, doctors, pilots and Santa Claus. You checklist

 

Jim Rembach: (33:04)

and what would be one book that you’d recommend to our Legion? And it could be from any genre. Of course, we’re going to put a link to situational mindsets on your show notes page as well.

 

Mary Lippitt: (33:14)

Well, I think the Daniel Kahneman’s thinking fast and slow is absolutely fantastic book. And I also will give a shout out to the art of war, my son zoo many, many years ago, which again talked about the importance of learning the lay of the ground. And that’s what I’m talking about with situationals concepts.

 

Jim Rembach: (33:34)

Okay. Fast, literally. And you can find links to that and other bonus information from today’s show by going to fast leader.net/mary lipid. Okay, Mary, this is my last Humpday hold on question. Imagine you’ve been given the opportunity to go back to the age of 25 and you can take the knowledge and skills that you have no back with you, but you can’t take it all. You can only choose one. So what skill or piece of knowledge would you take back with you and why?

 

Mary Lippitt: (33:57)

I would take back the ability to say I do not know. And the that leads to my willingness, um, to ask the questions and again, engage people and make a better decision. I really, I think for a while thought I do not know, was demeaning of me when I now realize it is showing the fact that I understand the complexity of this world.

 

Jim Rembach: (34:24)

Mary, I had fun with you today. Can you please share with the fast leader Legion how they can connect with you?

 

Mary Lippitt: (34:30)

Uh, they can connect with me at Mary, at situational mindsets.com or www, situational mindsets.com

 

Jim Rembach: (34:39)

Mary lipid, thank you for sharing and knowledge and wisdom. Fast leader Legion honors you and thanks you for helping us get over the hump.

[/expand]

085: Bob Tiede: I didn’t think my heart was wrong

Bob Tiede Show Notes

Bob Tiede had an Executive Vice President volunteer to fund raise for the organization he worked for. After two years he resigned. Shortly after that Bob learned the reason he resigned. It was because Bob was a benevolent teller. Listen to Bob’s story of how he learned a new way to move onward and upward faster.

Bob grew up on a farm in South Dakota where he earned his PHD at age 9!  That is when his Dad conferred on him the title of PHD standing for Post Hole Digger after he successfully dug his very first post hole all by himself.

Bob grew up in a very close extended family.  His Dad and his 3 brothers and 1 sister all had farms within 5 miles of each other.  All five families along with Grandpa and Grandma went to the same church and Bob and all of cousins attended the same school from grades 1-12!

Bob Tiede graduated from the University of South Dakota in 1971 where both he and his wife Sherry became involved with a Christian Student Movement now called Cru.

Upon Graduation they joined the staff of Cru where they have now served for 45 years. Bob serves on the Leadership Development Team – Developing the next generation of leaders for Cru.  Bob says, “In 15-20 years almost all of our current Cru leaders will no longer be leading. In their places will be the leaders we are now developing. If we fail now – Cru does not fail today or tomorrow – but may fail 15-20 years from now.

Bob’s role on Cru’s Leadership Development team is to recruit outstanding leaders from business, education, government & medicine, military and non-profits to coach Cru leaders every other week via SKYPE video.

In 2012 Bob started his blog LeadingWithQuestions.com, along with other social media efforts, as a way to better connect with his target audience: Cru’s emerging leaders who are 20 and 30-something. Today, his blog provides a continued source of new tools (new questions) for all of Cru’s Coaches and Leaders and is viewed by leaders in more than 170 countries.

Bob and his wife, Sherry, are proud parents of 4 adult children and super proud grandparents of six incredible grandchildren – all of whom love to ask their Papa Bob questions!

Tweetable Quotes and Mentions

Listen to @bobtiede and get over the hump on the @FastLeaderShow Click to Tweet

In 15 to 20 years almost every one of the current leaders will no longer be leading.” -Bob Tiede Click to Tweet

“History is filled with organizations once great that failed to prepare the next leaders.” -Bob Tiede Click to Tweet 

“The only way a leader can learn to lead is to start leading.” -Bob Tiede Click to Tweet 

“Being overly helpful actually diminishes people.” -Bob Tiede Click to Tweet 

“People don’t own what they hear somebody else tell them to do.” -Bob Tiede Click to Tweet 

“Great leaders lead with questions.” -Bob Tiede Click to Tweet 

“Starting with the simplest questions is what works best.” -Bob Tiede Click to Tweet 

“We all instinctively, when we answer a question, give a safe answer.” -Bob Tiede Click to Tweet 

“Silence is a great tool in asking questions.” -Bob Tiede Click to Tweet 

“If you ask a question be quiet, let them think.” -Bob Tiede Click to Tweet 

“Sometimes the longer the silence the better the answer.” -Bob Tiede Click to Tweet 

“Empower your staff to come up with the answers that they then own.” -Bob Tiede Click to Tweet 

“If you’re going to lead with questions, you got to listen” -Bob Tiede Click to Tweet 

“If you don’t ask, the answer is always no.” -Bob Tiede Click to Tweet 

“For a team to fire on all cylinders everyone’s oars need to be in the water.” -Bob Tiede Click to Tweet 

Hump to Get Over

Bob Tiede had an Executive Vice President volunteer to fund raise for the organization he worked for. After two years he resigned. Shortly after that Bob learned the reason he resigned. It was because Bob was a benevolent teller. Listen to Bob’s story of how he learned a new way to move onward and upward faster.

Advice for others

Don’t be a teller; lead with questions.

Holding him back from being an even better leader

I need to become a better listener.

Best Leadership Advice Received

You have not because you ask not. You’ve got to ask.

Secret to Success

I love being part of a team.

Best tools that helps in business or Life

The paradigm that great leaders lead with questions.

Recommended Reading

Leading with Questions: How Leaders Find the Right Solutions by Knowing What to Ask

Great Leaders ask Questions

Contacting Bob

Blog: http://leadingwithquestions.com/

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/bobtiede

Twitter: https://twitter.com/bobtiede

Resources

54 Emotional Intelligence (EQ) Competencies List: Emotional Intelligence has proven to be the right kind of intelligence to have if you want to move onward and upward faster. Get your free list today.

 

Show Transcript: 

[expand title=”Click to access edited transcript”]

085: Bob Tiede: I didn’t think my heart was wrong

Intro: Welcome to the Fast Leader Podcast, where we explore convenient yet effective shortcuts that will help you get ahead and move forward faster by becoming a better leader. And now here’s your host, customer and employee engagement expert and certified emotional intelligence practitioner, Jim Rembach.

 

Need a powerful and entertaining way to ignite your next conference, retreat or team-building session? My keynotes don’t include magic but they do have the power to help your attendees take a leap forward by putting emotional intelligence into their employee engagement, customer engagement and customer centric leadership practices. So bring the infotainment creativity the Fast Leader show to your next event and I’ll help your attendees get over the hump now. Go to beyondmorale.com/speaking to learn more. 

 

Jim Rembach:    Okay Fast Leader Legion, today I’m thrilled because we have somebody that’s going to help us with one of the most important aspects of leading others and ourselves and that’s asking questions. Bob Tiede grew up on a farm in South Dakota where he earned his PhD at age 9 that’s when his Dad conferred on him the title of PHD, Post Hole Digger after he successfully dug his very first post hole all by himself. Bob grew up in a very close extended family. His dad and his three brothers and one sister all have farms within 5 miles of each other. All five families along with grandma and grandpa went to the same church and Bob and all of his cousins attended the same school from grades one through 12. Bob Tiede graduated from the University of South Dakota 1971 where both he and his wife Sherry became involved with the Christian student movement now called Cru. 

 

Upon graduation they join the staff of Cru where they have now served for 45 years. Bob serves on the leadership development team developing next generation of leaders for Cru. Bob says in 15 to 20 years almost all of our current Cru leaders will no longer be leading in their places will be the leaders we are now developing. If we fail now Cru does not fail today or tomorrow but may fail in 15 to 20 years from now. Bob’s role on Cru’s leadership development team is to recruit outstanding leaders from business, education, government, medicine, military and nonprofit to coach Cru’s leaders every other week via Skype video. In 2012 Bob started his blog leadingwithquestion.com as a way to better connect with his target audience. Cru’s emerging leaders who are the 20 to 30 somethings. Today his blog provides a continued source of new tools, new questions for all of Cru’s coaches and leaders and is viewed by leaders in more than 170 countries. Bob and his wife Sherry are proud parents of four adult children and super proud grandparents of six incredible grandchildren all of whom love to ask their Papa Bob questions. Bob Tiede are you ready to help us get over the hump?

 

Bob Tiede:    Jim, I am so ready and so excited to join the day the Fast Leader Legion. 

 

Jim Rembach:    And I’m glad to have you. I’ve given our listeners a little bit about you but can you tell us what your current passion is so that we can get to know you even better?

 

Bob Tiede:    You really mention, my mission statement is, developing the next generation of leaders for Cru. And as you shared it’s true not just of Cru but every organization 15 to 20 years almost every one of the current leaders will no longer be leading. And you know history is filled with stories of organizations, companies, churches once great thriving, vital, 15 to 20 years later they may not even exist or shell of themselves and when you dig around one of the things you find is that there was no preparation of the next generation to lead.

 

Jim Rembach:    And it’s  interesting that you say that. I’ve looked at a lot of statistics associated with what our CEO’s focusing in on. One of the things that’s really been on top of mind and on top of the list for over the past several years is this whole leadership pipeline, leadership bench strength, all those things associated with what you’re talking about. However, when you start looking at the amount of money that’s really invested by a lot of organizations and it varies by different countries as far as what to spend but it really is a lot of money but when you look at the effect or the impact on that next generation of leaders they say that the performance is so poor, why is that?

 

Bob Tiede:    Tell me more, Jim, help me understand the question just a little bit more?

 

Jim Rembach:    You’re the master of asking question, I should have known that was coming. For me when you start looking at the return on investment on leadership development it’s very low. Why is it low?

 

Bob Tiede:    Uh-mm, well I’ll hazard a guess. Jim we launched our current leadership program in 2005 we took about a year to develop it and we still don’t have a perfect program that is for sure. In fact, there’s a quote from the World War II Gen. George Patten, he says, “An imperfect plan violently executed today is far superior to perfect plan when it’s too late.” And so our commitment was we’re going to launch this thing and then we’re going to evaluate it and improve it and re-launch it and keep on going. But we came up with two components that I think make an incredible difference. And Jim I’m going to ask you a really silly question, if I didn’t know how to swim and I wanted to become a swimmer is there a book you could recommend that if I just read that book I could then say I’m a swimmer? 

 

Jim Rembach:    Of course not.

 

Bob Tiede:    Okay. How about a video series? Maybe a video that would show all the gold medal swims from the last Olympics, if I watch all of those videos could I then call myself a swimmer?

 

Jim Rembach:    I’ll even say that when I was a kid I had Mark Spitz poster on my wall with all his gold medals for many years and I still never got good at swimming. 

 

Bob Tiede:    Yes. If I want to become a swimmer what do I need to do?

 

Jim Rembach:    You got to practice.

 

Bob Tiede:    I got to get wet. I got to get in the water and I think a lot of leadership development programs, this is my guess focus on what I would say, read the book, watch the video, and those are helpful but unless you get in the water with whatever that is you can’t call yourself a leader the only way a leader can learn to lead is to start leading. And so, one of the things we do on our leadership program is action learning. We put them in groups of about five or six we usually have four of these teams and each one of them is given a challenge, a major challenge, facing our organization. In other words, it’s not just a case study, it’s not busywork these are real stuff and they’re given six months 20% of their time basically a day a week, to do all the due diligence to come up and six months later to present to the leadership of Cru their solution. 

 

We are now on our sixth iteration of this and action learning has been a game changer because it actually allows them to get in the water. And the second thing, and when you were introducing me you mentioned this, we recruited outstanding leaders from outside our organization, the coach every other week are leaders. And Jim I’ll ask you another question, you may have a coach but if you had somebody you met with every other week and they just asked you these three questions, first question: “Jim last time we were together you said that by today you wanted to make progress in A, B and C, tell me how that’s gone? Now mind you they didn’t tell you what you needed to do last time you said here’s what I wanted to do. Second question: Can we confirm when we’re meeting again? It may be same time, same place, two weeks from today but you asked to confirm. Third question: Jim, by then what further progress do you want to make? Mind you, I’m taking notes because that would be my first question two weeks from now. Those two things have been game changers in developing leaders. Now do we have it perfect now? No. But do we feel really good about the investment were making that it’s actually making a difference? Absolutely.

 

Jim Rembach:    Yeah, thanks for sharing that. As I was thinking about what you were saying I started thinking about the distinction between what is training, what is mentoring and what is coaching. Those three questions are more coach based because you’re not putting in the answers all you’re doing is working with what’s already inside and that’s the key distinction I think that we really have to make these days with a lot of folks. Because they essentially want to tell people what they’re supposed to be doing and there’s no thinking that’s involve and so we’re not depositing in them were essentially just giving them all the answers and therefore they don’t have to come up within themselves and I think that is something that stifles a lot of growth and leadership opportunity in a lot of folks. So, when you start talking about—I think you talked about having a particular addiction about being a teller, right? 

 

Bob Tiede:    Jim, I’m a charter member of TA. Now most people don’t know what TA is, they’re familiar with AA for example, I don’t mean out of personal experience but they’ve heard of Alcoholics Anonymous—A.A.  T.A. stands for Tellers Anonymous. And we go to our meetings and I stand up and I said my name is Bob I’m a Teller and they say, welcome Bob. The truth is many, many years of my leadership I was what you would call a benevolent dictator. I was overly helpful. I was a micro director, a micro-teller. If you ask me Bob what time is it? I not only told you what time I told you how watches are made. And, oh! Jim, can I share really painful story?

 

Jim Rembach:    You sure can. 

 

Bob Tiede:    About 20 years ago, I was privileged and I was so excited I had an incredible leader volunteer at no cost to join our development team, our fundraising team. He had recently retired as one of the top five leaders at JC Penney’s, fabulous company he was the international executive VP. Two years later he resigned and a bit after that I discovered the reason he resigned. He said in his entire career he had never served under someone who so told him step-by-step what he needed to do. And I thought I was being helpful, but it was like, I was saying, “Here, you know, ABCD. Here’s another word picture, I’m not an artist and so if I see something that is—draw this picture by connect the dots, go from 1 to 2, 2 to 3, 3 to 4 that’s kind of fun, but if you’re an artist and you work in an art studio and they insisted that you draw all your pictures that way and somebody else designed them you wouldn’t stay there very long because where is the chance to flourish yourself? Well, at that point I really didn’t understand, I really didn’t. It was a much later that I understood that being overly helpful, because again I even look back now and said, I don’t think my heart was wrong I was just stupid. But being overly helpful actually diminishes people, it doesn’t let them grow, it doesn’t let them flourish and they don’t own what they hear somebody else tell them to do. 

 

And so, it was much later, in fact I’d actually moved in to this role and in 2006, I came across a book, browsing a bookstore, I came across a book called Leading with Question by Dr. Michael Marquardt. As I browse that book in the bookstore, I only read a few pages, and said this one’s going home with me and I took it home and it was a page turner and reading that book forever changed my leadership. Because as I read that book I had the “aha” and I shared that awful experience, imagine losing a talent like that because you are being overly helpful, but I understood what I done wrong and saw this new paradigm, the great leaders lead with questions. You know, in the book there was a quote, there’s many quotes, but I love this quote from Dr. Peter Drucker: “The leader of the past may have been a person who knew how to tell but certainly the leader of the future will be a person who knows how to ask.” 

 

At any rate as I grab that new paradigm in my leadership development role I began to teach out of that book, do presentations put them together they were so well received. One example, I had been with the global operations team of Cru and I was there for another meeting but the next morning kind of a check-in time, I was not going to speak that morning I’d spoken earlier, but during the check-in time one of the colleagues on that team a wife and mother, not my wife but on the team, she’s volunteered there she said, Oh! I’ve got to thank Bob. She said, Last night I think I had the best conversation with my son that I’ve ever had.” Her son was two years out of the University, was are ready succeeding as a young professional, but what she said is, you know every time we get on the phone my son will mentioned some topic and I will then tell him what he needs to do. She said, Last night when we got on the phone he mentioned the topic and I said, tell me more about that? And then he did. And I said, what do you think you ought to do? And he did share that all she did was ask basic questions and she said I think it was the finest conversation I’ve ever had. Thank you so much Bob. Well I turn around and said, let us thank Michael Marquardt for writing the book. 

 

Jim Rembach:    Thanks for sharing that. You’ve got me to start thinking about a couple of instances with certain individuals that I’ve had to where I’ve tried, I’ve attempted to ask the questions so that they can answer them for themselves.  However, it’s almost a situation to where two things. One was a choice, they chose to just—no, just give me the answer I need to hurry I need to go. And the other is, there was an older person that I think they had become so conditioned and brainwashed to have answers be given to them that when I started asking those questions they seem like a lost soul. So how do you reprogram or program somebody to actually answer questions that are given to them?

 

Bob Tiede:    That’s a great question I want to make kind of a comment. Someone have seen my research that the average four-year-old asked over 200 questions a day. And then we send them to school and in most again well-meaning teachers now it’s a five-year-old or six-year-old is asking a lot of questions and the teacher at some point says, Johnny it’s my job to ask questions it’s your job to answer them. And over time they get reprogram. I’m told that the average college graduate only ask 20 questions a day. And so we really do have this—what’s happening in the education system is don’t ask questions give answers and so reprogramming that can be difficult. What I find is starting with the simplest questions is what works best. For example, in my book—Great Leaders Ask Questions, which by the way have a free e-book on my blog, but in that book I share that I can teach anyone to lead with questions in 30 seconds. Can I try that with you Jim?

 

Jim Rembach:    Let’s do it. 

 

Bob Tiede:    Okay. I want you to memorize my four favorite questions I’m going to share them with you and we’ll see if 30 seconds later you can restate them back to me. Here’s the first question: What you think? And of course in the situation you would add about whatever’s on the table. What do you thinks the best way forward with his client? What you think we could do about this? So, it’d related. But first question, what you think? The second one is what else? The third one is what else? The fourth one is, what else? Now Jim, do you have this memorized?

 

Jim Rembach:    I think I do. 

 

Jim Rembach:    Let’s hear them. 

 

Bob Tiede:    I just remember the, what else, what else, what else?  Three times and I know when things are said three times we remember them best. What was the first one again? 

 

Jim Rembach:    The first one is, what do you think? 

 

Bob Tiede:    What do you think?

 

Bob Tiede:    And then, what else, what else, what else. Now may sound funny but here’s what I’ve discovered is that we all kind of instinctively when we answer a question give a safe answer we’re protective of ourselves it’s not a conscious thing it’s a subconscious. And if I say Jim, what you think about? And you give me an answer and I saw it Jim that’s stupid anyone knows that, we’ll you’re glad you didn’t say anything else. But if I say, wow! Jim tell me more, what else? And you give another answer. And I said Jim take a notes. Keep talking, what else. What I discovered is that you get to the gold nugget on about the third or fourth what else because they’re feeling really safe it’s like wow the guy asking must be really smart they keep asking me, they keep telling him more. But by is starting that way, you don’t make a big deal out of starting to lead with questions, you don’t ask him, and again you’re never trying to ask him I got you question your you’re not the 60 minutes investigator, and then you have listen and you appreciate what’s being said. 

 

Another key that I find and I shared in my book is silenced is a great tool in asking questions. Many times we’ll say, Jim what do you think about? And they’re not immediately answering. And so we say, well you know, and we ask it again or we stack another question because were uncomfortable with the silence.  But if we if you ask a question be quiet let them think they will answer and sometimes the longer the silence the better the answer. Jim that’s not a perfect solution you can’t make somebody talk that doesn’t want to but if you start simple give him time, appreciate what they say, you’ll begin to make progress I think with almost anyone.

 

Jim Rembach:    Thanks for sharing that.  There’s a couple of things that I pulled out as you’re talking and one is be authentic with your listening, don’t judge, I think that’s important because you want to be able to build that trust, be patient. You’ve got to weight them out I guess if you want the answers, you have to weight them out. So I know you have a lot of things going on. I know you’ve been with Cru for—oh my goodness, having a 45 year career with one organization is just unheard of these days. But you got the grandkids, you’ve got a lot of things going on, so tell me Bob when you think about your goals, what else?

 

Bob Tiede:    Jim it’s interesting as I share my mission really is developing the next generation of leaders for Cru. When I look at those six grandkids sometimes Jim when I’m doing a presentation I would say, and I don’t know the next slide coming up but I’ll say, we’ve identified what we think are the six highest potential future leaders, would you like to see who we’ve identified? And of course, the audience ask for the next slides, my grandkids. And so, we are focused on developing them of course age-appropriate. But Jim, another thing that has become a sweet spot you mentioned that I started this blog leadingwithquestions.com I did it just as a better way to connect with the young emerging leaders in our organization. Also to provide a resource to the coaches that we’d recruited. And oh, Jim I make a funny comment I have no idea how 747 can get in the air but that doesn’t stop me from flying. And this thing called the Internet I still have no idea how it actually works but it doesn’t stop me from using it. And so you launch this blog it gets out there and I’m just blown away that I’m being followed now by leaders from 170 nations.

 

And so another mission statement I have is helping leaders increase their leadership effectiveness times ten and I really believe it is possible to increase times ten from moving from the paradigm of leading by telling, like I was the benevolent dictator, to leading with questions where we empower our staff to come up with the answers that they then own and are going to be much more motivated to execute on plus we get the best thinking of everyone. Another kind of silly story or question I ask is,  Jim if you are about with all your staff and they all had oars and are wanting to get across the lake how many of them would you like to have row with you?

 

Jim Rembach:    Every single of them. 

 

Bob Tiede:    Yeah.  So that I’ve never had a leader say otherwise Jim. But I then asked Jim, so why would any of us want to, with our staff, take them on into the future and we’re the only one that has an oar in the water? Why aren’t we asking them? What did they think? How would they approach this? And in that way you get the best thinking, the brain power of everyone on your team.

 

Jim Rembach:    We wish you the very best in all of your, what else is Bob? Now before we move let’s get a quick word from our sponsor. 

 

An even better place to work is an easiest solution that gives you a continuous diagnostic on employee engagement along with integrated activities that will improve employee engagement and leadership skills in everyone. Using this award winning solutions guarantee to create motivated, productive and loyal employees who have great work relationships with their colleagues and your customers. To learn more about an even better place to work, visit beyondmorale.com /better.

 

Jim Rembach:    Alright, here we go Fast Leader Legion it’s time for the Hump Day Hoedown. Okay Bob, the Hump Day Hoedown is the part of our show where you give us good insights fast. So, I’m going to ask you several questions and your job is to give us robust yet rapid responses that are going to help us move onward and upward faster.  Bob Tiede—

 

Bob Tiede:    I’m ready to go. 

 

Jim Rembach:    Alright you’re ready to hoedown. So, what do you think is holding you back from being even better leader today? 

 

Bob Tiede:    It’s simple. I need to become a better listener. You know there’s a quote by David Augsburger said that: “Being heard is so close to being loved that for the average person they are almost indistinguishable.” If you’re going to lead with questions you got to listen and I have to become a better listener.

 

Jim Rembach:    What is the best leadership advice you ever received?

 

Bob Tiede:    Jim, I’m going to say that it’s from the brother Jesus James who shares in his New Testament book he shares this: You have not because you ask not. If you don’t ask the answers always no or no input, no insight, thoughts or wisdom from others, so you got to ask. 

 

Jim Rembach:    What is one of your secrets that you believe contributes to your success?

 

Bob Tiede:    Here’s another quote, I don’t know who to attribute it to but the quote says, “None of us is as good as all of us.” I love being part of a team, the scripture says that one chases a thousand but two will chase ten thousand. And for a team to fire on all cylinders everyone oarer’s has to be on the water. And the only way that can happen is where that team culture is one of leading with questions. 

 

Jim Rembach:    What do you feel is one of your best tools that helps you lead in business or life? 

 

Bob Tiede:    Jim I’m going to sound like a broken record but I really believe it’s the paradigm that great leaders lead with questions. 

 

Jim Rembach:    What would be one book, and it could be from any genre, that you’d recommend to our listeners?

 

Bob Tiede:    Jim, I’d like to recommend the book by Dr. Michael Marquardt that forever changed my paradigm and his book is called, “Leading with Question”, it’s now in its second edition. It’s an outstanding book.

 

Jim Rembach:    Okay. Fast Leader listeners you can find links to that and other bonus information including Bob’s e-book by going to fastleader.net/Bob Tiede. Okay Bob, this is my last Hump Day Hoedown question: Imagine you were given the opportunity to go back to the age 25. And you’ve been given the opportunity to take the knowledge and skill that you have now back with you. But you can’t take everything back you can only choose one. So, what skill or piece of knowledge would you take back with you and why?

 

Bob Tiede:    Jim that’s easy. I would take back the paradigm that great leaders ask questions. 

 

Jim Rembach:    Okay, Bob it was an honor to spend time with you today, can you please share with the fast leader listeners how they can connect with?

 

Bob Tiede:    Oh, Jim, it’s been great to be with you. And Fast Leader listeners you can connect with me on my blog, leadingwithquestions.com again leadingwithquestions.com.

 

Jim Rembach:    Bob Tiede, thank you for sharing you knowledge and wisdom the Fast Leader Legion honors you and thanks you for helping us get over the hump. Woot! Woot! 

 

Thank you for joining me on the Fast Leader show today. For recaps, links from every show, special offers and access to download and subscribe, if you haven’t already, head on over the fastleader.net so we can help you move onward and upward faster.

 

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