page title icon Jack Bergstrand

Jack Bergstrand The Velocity Advantage

184: Jack Bergstrand: It was an over-my-dead-body conversation

Jack Bergstrand Show Notes Page

Jack Bergstrand was a young executive at Coca-Cola working on changing the distribution network to gain efficiency and lower costs. But his plan negatively impacted manufacturing, which he was not in charge of. Jack had to go head-to-head to make headway.

Jack was born and raised in rural Illinois, growing up in the small town, Silvis, with a population of 5,280. He was the fourth of four boys, ten years younger than the oldest, and lived in the same house his whole life, with the same two parents who ended up being married for 70 years.

Growing up, Jack did not find school very interesting, but his mother wanted him to be the first person in their family to graduate from college. Things finally kicked in, and he received a master’s degree at Michigan State before he was 21 and ended up getting two more master’s degrees—from Stanford and George Washington. After graduating from Michigan State, he left Silvis and got a job with The Coca-Cola Company in Boston, Massachusetts as a management trainee.

Jack had many different jobs at The Coca-Cola Company. He was chief marketing officer and managed a division at The Coca-Cola Bottling Company of New England, led the Distribution function for Coca-Cola Enterprises after its initial public offering, was head of Manufacturing and Logistics and then chief financial officer, for Coca-Cola Beverages in Canada, and was chief information officer for The Coca-Cola Company. On his 43rd birthday, Jack then started his own company, Brand Velocity and now Consequent—inspired by management legend Peter Drucker—to focus on what Drucker called knowledge work productivity in organizations. Jack simply calls it The Velocity Advantage. He has worked with large clients for more than 15 years on their most important strategic initiatives.

Jack considers his business legacy to be the publishing of his book, The Velocity Advantage, and its predecessor Reinvent Your Enterprise, and having had the ability to apply his intellectual property in practice and being able to see it make a difference with important cross-functional initiatives and with people’s careers.

Jack lives in Atlanta, Georgia, is married, and has a son and daughter—both living in Georgia

Tweetable Quotes and Mentions

Listen to @jackbergstrand to get over the hump on the @FastLeaderShow Click to Tweet

“Large business transformation initiatives fail 70% of the time.” -Jack Bergstrand Click to Tweet

“People who work in large organizations are typically going from meeting to meeting.” -Jack Bergstrand Click to Tweet 

“It’s the lack of holism that gets people stuck so many times.” -Jack Bergstrand Click to Tweet 

“We continue to get stuck because we all go back to our own mental models on what has worked for us in the past.” -Jack Bergstrand Click to Tweet 

“Velocity is the combination of speed and direction.” -Jack Bergstrand Click to Tweet 

“It’s very easy for someone to analyze something to death and never get out of the blocks.” -Jack Bergstrand Click to Tweet 

“It’s knowledge-work productivity versus manual-labor productivity that drives success.” -Jack Bergstrand Click to Tweet 

“It’s very easy to get started right now and then end up painting yourself in a corner later.” -Jack Bergstrand Click to Tweet 

“To get velocity requires a slightly longer start, but then a dramatically shorter conclusion.” -Jack Bergstrand Click to Tweet 

“The disruptors are never slow and the disrupted are always slow.” -Jack Bergstrand Click to Tweet 

“The hardest model to break is one that has worked for you in the past.” -Jack Bergstrand Click to Tweet 

“Nobody wants to work a year or two years on something and not have it succeed.” -Jack Bergstrand Click to Tweet 

“Projects are the common denominator on how companies move forward.” -Jack Bergstrand Click to Tweet 

“Every time I resist letting go of the tried and true, I usually get hurt.” -Jack Bergstrand Click to Tweet 

“It doesn’t cost anything to be nice to somebody, but it can sure cost you if you’re not.” -Jack Bergstrand Click to Tweet 

Hump to Get Over

Jack Bergstrand was a young executive at Coca-Cola working on changing the distribution network to gain efficiency and lower costs. But his plan negatively impacted manufacturing, which he was not in charge of. Jack had to go head-to-head to make headway.

Advice for others

Don’t interpret questions as defiance. Try to understand where they’re coming from.

Holding him back from being an even better leader

Every time I resist letting go of the tried and true, I usually get hurt.

Best Leadership Advice

It doesn’t cost anything to be nice to somebody, but it can sure cost you if you’re not.

Secret to Success

Never, ever, ever give up.

Best tools in business or life

Strategic profiling.

Recommended Reading

The Velocity Advantage

The Effective Executive: The Definitive Guide to Getting the Right Things Done (Harperbusiness Essentials)

Contacting Jack Bergstrand

Email: jbergstrand [at] cnsqnt.com

website: https://cnsqnt.com/

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/bergstrand/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/jackbergstrand

Resources and Show Mentions

Call Center Coach

An Even Better Place to Work

 

Show Transcript: 

Click to access edited transcript

184: Jack Bergstrand: It was an over-my-dead-body conversation

Intro: Welcome to the Fast Leader Podcast, where we uncover the leadership like hat that help you to experience break out performance faster and rocket to success. Now here’s your host customer and employee engagement expert and certified emotional intelligence practitioner, Jim Rembach.

 

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Jim Rembach:    Okay, Fast Leader legion today I’m excited because the person that I have on the show today really addresses something that I dare to say every organization regarding whether or not they’re public, private, start-up, long term company really has to pay attention to and have it be a part of who they are and what they do every single day from here on going forward. 

Jack was born and raised in Royal, Illinois, growing up in the small town, Silvis with a population of 5,280. He was the fourth of four boys, ten years younger than the oldest, and lived in the same house his whole life, with the same two parents who ended up being married for 70 years.

Growing up, Jack did not find school very interesting, but his mother wanted him to be the first person in their family to graduate from college. Things finally kicked in, and he received a master’s degree at Michigan State before he was 21 and ended up getting two more master’s degrees—from Stanford and George Washington. After graduating from Michigan State, he left Silvis and got a job with The Coca-Cola Company in Boston, Massachusetts as a management trainee.

Jack had many different jobs at The Coca-Cola Company. He was chief marketing officer and managed a division at The Coca-Cola Bottling Company of New England, led the Distribution function for Coca-Cola Enterprises after its initial public offering, was head of Manufacturing and Logistics and then chief financial officer, for Coca-Cola Beverages in Canada, and was chief information officer for The Coca-Cola Company. On his 43rd birthday, Jack then started his own company, Brand Velocity and now Consequent—inspired by management legend Peter Drucker—to focus on what Drucker called knowledge work productivity in organizations. Jack simply calls it The Velocity Advantage. He has worked for large clients for more than 15 years on their most important strategic initiatives.

Jack considers his business legacy to be the publishing of his book, The Velocity Advantage, and its predecessor Reinvent Your Enterprise, and having had the ability to apply his intellectual property in practice and being able to see and make a difference with important cross-functional initiatives and with people’s careers. 

Jack lives in Atlanta, Georgia with his wife Cynthia and has a son and daughter—currently living in the area as well. Jack Bergstrand, are you ready to help us get over the hump?

 

Jack Bergstrand:       I am. I’m looking forward to it.

Jim Rembach:     And I’m glad you’re here. Now I’ve given our legion a little bit about you, but could you tell us what you’re current passion is so that we can get to know you even better

Jack Bergstrand:       Jim, simply my passion is to help others achieve amazing cross functional outcomes with unexpected ease. 

Jim Rembach:     Now you talking about ease—that just rolled off your tongue with ease but we know cross functional work and doing business today is no simple task in most cases it is career ender. When you look at large business transformation initiatives they fail 70 percent of the time. People who are working in large organizations typically are going from meeting to meeting typically interacting with others who aren’t seeing the world exactly the way they are and struggling to get on the same page relative to quite simple thing like where you intend to go on and why in a given timeframe. What the priorities should be and how to best do them? Who should be responsible? And things that in theory quite seem to be quite simple when you put them in a cross functional organization context are quite difficult. 

Jim Rembach:     If you’re talking about the characteristics of a larger organization versus a mid-tier smaller organization, it seems to me like they have an inherent crutch. What I mean by that is companies that are so large, the people who are in departments or in silos really only know that part of the business and for them to be able to think holistically about other aspects of the business it so difficult because everything is just so process driven. Is there a potential advantage to other organizations because they don’t have that crutch?  Or is it a situation that a large organizations can actually get through it better because they have more resources available to them?

Jack Bergstrand:       I think it’s neutral between large and smaller companies for the same reason. We have all come up a certain track, we all have a certain background, we all have a certain perspective whether it’s a cross functional team in a smaller organization or a larger organization it’s the same fundamental work that has to get done. It can get a more complicated in a larger organization but basically getting the work done is the same because you got a subset of folks. Whether you’re part of a 20 person organization or a 60,000 person organization. You basically have a goal you got to allocate resources you’ve got to come up with a solution and how to best implement it. 

Jim Rembach:     Okay, that makes sense. I started looking at your book, in the beginning it talks about—this velocity advantage actually containing the integration of more than 50,000 pages from hundreds of sources and decades of business experience. And so for me, I’m like, oh, my gosh! I hope I don’t have to learn all this, but for your book you have to because there is a quiz at the back of the book. 

Jack Bergstrand:       But if you don’t want to take it. For me I look at it the other way and that is rather than have 200 books you only have to read one. Rather than read 50, 000 pages you can pretty easily get to the book in a couple of hours three max. k oh my done to help people think about business in a much more holistic way because you pointed out earlier and it’s absolutely true is that lack of holism that it’s people stuck so many times so if you’re in your functional salo or if you’re looking at things very properly and you’re not thinking about things from a marketing of finance a supply chain in a human resources perspective it’s going to be a lot harder to move forward, so one book you’ve got it all. 

Jim Rembach:      One of the things too that I like from the very beginning is you show the differences. I guess you could say in organizational focus going from the Frederick Taylor-ism which is the whole productivity side of the work going to the Drucker side which is more that knowledge management or knowledge type of work and then you added on the velocity advantage components. Like for example, with Frederick Taylor-ism you talked about defining task in Drucker he focused more and talked about understanding tasks and from a velocity advantage you talk about concrete tasks. And you go through and look several things like command and control going all the way through strict standards and moving along but one of the things that you talk about in here is learning and teaching through facilitated collaboration as a velocity advantage versus Drucker who talked about continuously learning and teaching, what’s really the difference between the two?

Jack Bergstrand:       Once an evolution of the other and most of Drucker’s work was aimed at individuals in an organizational context. And what the velocity advantage focuses on is the cross functional nature of the work in these organizations and the need to get multiple people to integrate their own thinking and to implement that thinking. To do that productively benefits a great deal from facilitation, a shared language, a shared framework so that I’m not trying to teach you to think like me and you’re not trying to teach me to think like you but there’s a framework that’s bigger than both of us and in many cases bigger than the company’s even that we were in to get work done in a much more productive way.

Jim Rembach:      So ultimately when we start talking about being able to have the velocity advantage became part of the organization DNA, you’re really talking about—can I refer to it as kind of like a stack of things that you have to really have in place. First of all you have to have the envision, design, build and activate process which is EDBA, you have to have strategic profiling and action planning which you talk about being SPAP and then also the project management life cycle which is PMLC, if you could explain what those things are and how they really work and compliment or maybe even amplify one another?

Jack Bergstrand:        Yeah, absolutely. It all started with the first ten years of 10:25 and consequent was focused on large enterprise initiatives that had gone astray. They tended to be hundreds and millions of dollars, they didn’t struggle from lack of resources but they predictably fail and were at least failed relative to their original desire.  What we found in all cases what there was either a gap or a sequence problem between a clear understanding of where they intended to go and why, which is the essence of envision, what therefore needed to be done and when, which is the essence of design, how to best do those things, which is what the foundation of build is and who should be responsible for what which is what activate is all about. So getting envision in front of design, design in front of build, build in front of activate is a key part of making it work.

Now that’s pretty easy to get that you shouldn’t determine how you’re going to do something before you determine what you’re going to do but it’s not human nature in a cross-functional environment. Few got it but people continue to get stuck because we all go back to our own mental models on what has worked for us in the past. So, SPAP or Strategic Profiling Action Planning was created to help with that and to focus more on the project’s themselves. So strategic profiling just like a Myers Briggs for the velocity advantage in that we map people in terms of what their preferences are to the characteristics of envision, design, build, activate which get them to identify with the model both as an individual and then as a cross-functional team. And then we facilitate them through or a particular initiative, where they intend to go and why? What they need to do and when? How to best do those things? Who is going to be responsible for what? And then they walk away with an integrated plan and sometimes that’s the first time they’ve ever had one and it doesn’t take a long time. And then that life cycle simply manages it from a project perspective using the same language, integrating the same people, because effective way envision, design, build, activate is the way a project management life cycle works as well. 

Jim Rembach:     If I’m sitting here and maybe I am not a cross-functional team as of now, however I want to gain or receive greater levels of velocity maybe for my group, my team, how can I take advantage of some of the tools that you are referring to here? 

Jack Bergstrand:       Pretty easily. Even at an individual level—if you’re planning a family vacation you should follow envision, design, build, activate, you should determine where you’re going to go before you decide what you’re going to do, how you’re going to get there and who you are going to bring along with you. And so it works at a very simple level but then as you get more complex it also works but it provides more value because those things get messed up a lot more often. Its use a lot when a new leader comes in place. You got a team that’s wondering what the leader’s all about. The new leaders wondering about what the new team is about. Typically there is that hundred day period which is agony for everybody and so to get everybody in the same room to kind of go through what gives them energy or doesn’t give them energy relative to the envision, design, build, activate model and then work together on something that’s important to them as a way to build teamwork as a by-product of doing something as opposed to letting teamwork be the destination in itself. 

Jim Rembach:     You talk about first hundred days, you said agony I thought that was the honeymoon? 

Jack Bergstrand:       A lot of times it is, but it’s an agony if you’re not the boss because that gives you hundred days to not know where you stand. 

Jim Rembach:     That’s a very good point. When we start talking about the need for velocity, several times you reference it on the book it said, a lot of people can have speed a lot of people can obtain velocity but it’s the combination of what and velocity that really makes the difference? 

Jack Bergstrand:       Velocity is the combination of speed and direction. So it’s very easy for somebody to analyze something to death and never get out of the box, it happens all the time. It’s also very easy to get started right now, go, go, go and then end up paining yourself in the corner later. But in terms of actually getting stuff done if that’s what success is and I believe it is and most people would agree then you need the combination of speed and direction. And where do they get speed and direction at the same time? You need to be clear about where you intend to go and why in a given timeframe which is envision. Then have that define what needs to, which is the essence of design. Then have that constrain you in terms of what’s the best way in terms of the how to and then have that define who’s going to be responsible for what. And so velocity will have a slightly—to get velocity requires a slightly longer start but then a dramatically shorter conclusion and at the end of the day that’s what matters most. 

Jim Rembach:     I think for me when I started looking at framework and how you stacked all this things together it seemed to me like there’s certain things that grease the wheel. Yeah, you could just slap the wheel together but without any grease guess what you end up with? A whole lot of friction and burn. 

Jack Bergstrand:       Yeah. It happens all the time. And people oftentimes think they’re upfront they think that a lot further ahead than they really are. And then there comes a point where they recognize they’re a lot further behind they thought they were and that’s usually when bad things start to happen. 

I can definitely see that. When we’re talking about this need for velocity as well as that whole envisioning and direction piece there’s a whole lot of inspiration that we need in order to keep us focused. One of the things that we look at on the show are quotes to help us do that, is there a quote or two that you like that you can share?

Jack Bergstrand:       Yeah. One that I like a lot—when I was the chief information officer at Coke I had the opportunity to be interviewed for a book called Business at the Speed of Thought which was something that Bill Gates had written. In that book he wrote and so I would quote, The increase in velocity is great enough the very nature of business changes. And I’ve always love that quote and I think it’s a very important one more important now than ever it’s even more important than it was then. Another way to look at it is that history has always shown us that the disruptors are never slow and the disrupted are always slow. And so when you think about velocity and the ability to cross functionally institutionalize it it’s a critical mechanism for the velocity of an organization to be able to have velocity in the projects that they do because the projects are ultimately what drive them forward.

 

Jim Rembach:     So I would imagine that when you started going through the different positions within Coke and the different roles that you played in it just thinking about the different personalities and while I would dare to say the reason that it seems like when I look at your background it wasn’t like you were doing things that were very similar you jump to totally different functional areas. I would imagine to say that this type of framework and approach was something that enabled you to do that. But in order to get to that point learn those approaches so that that things become easier there’s a lot of humps that we have to get over and there’s a lot of learnings that I’m sure you had and that you could probably teach us. Is there a time that you have gotten over the hump that you can share? 

 

Jack Bergstrand:       Yeah, I think for about ten years of my career I was pretty actively involved in the restructuring of the Coca Cola bottlers system. When Coca Cola Enterprises were formed I was on the due diligence for that. So when you think about the Coke World at that time it was generally a bunch of family owned operations around the country. If you were the bottler in a particular city, your town you basically were Mister, in those case it’s always Mister, Mister Coca Cola, you’re one of the most powerful people in town everybody knew who you were and then all of a sudden this thing called Coca Cola Enterprises came about and so you had all of these people who had never been told what to do for generations and now they’re part of a bigger company. And that filtered all the way down whether you owned it or whether you were a route sales per person on it on a coke truck it was the same kind of an attitude that—we are Coca Cola for this particular town and there it was a thing of beauty in many respects. But when you try to integrate all of that and restructure like the way manufacturing works and the way distribution works and marketing and the whole host of other things the relationship with retailers sometimes it works okay even well and other times that work horribly. 

 

My hump was that I couldn’t really figure out how to predictably do it with less pain. There were certainly examples that because of the people and a host of reasons it just really went easily to change from one thing to another, in other cases it was just a battle from the very beginning. And so I would say that that was a hump that—once I read Post Capitalist Society from Peter Drucker he put words around this that really makes to me. The words that he used this phrase which is a little archaic today but this phrase called knowledge were productivity and when he talked about it in Post Capital Society he had talked about it for many years before. It was largely that in today’s companies at that time and it’s still true today knowledge were productivity versus manual labor productivity that drives success. And once he put those words around the things began to click for me in terms of, what was it the heart of when it works well and when it didn’t work well? And if we could just begin to systematize it a bet then we could be able to a more predictively make changes in large organizations by making changes in the way we do cross functional initiatives. 

 

Jim Rembach:     I can only imagine when you’re going through a couple of those times when it was quite difficult, there’s a whole lot of things you learn from that. Can you think of one specific time where it was like most memorable?

 

Jack Bergstrand:       One in particular. When Coca Cola Enterprises was formed I was the first distribution function head. When you look at it now nationally instead of as a host of small independent bottling companies, how do you want to do distribution? And then they’re somebody else who say, how do you want to do manufacturing? And somebody else, how do we want to do administration? And as I was working on the distribution piece I had developed a model that to me worked really well and to my boss worked really well on how to reconfigure the distribution network so that you could reduce the amount of inventory, the amount of space that was required, still stay close to the market and it reduce costs significantly except one area, and that area was manufacturing. Because the manufacturing actually had to increase its cost so that it could have more flexibility in terms of how it generated inventory so it had to be able to ramp up and down as opposed to have a steady state. 

 

That was a very painful time in my life I was fairly young and the head of manufacturing also reported to the same person that I did was much more powerful than I was and our boss just seem to delight in this what he called creative tension but it was really structural incompatibility. And so, it was extremely painful because we really have models and we were driving down our own models that would not work together but because of having somebody who believed that that was okay it just didn’t work. So, that lead to my next job to run manufacturing and logistics in Canada and I had a lot of support as well. But I was able to then make the trade off on the manufacturing side of my job in order to get the benefits on the logistic side of the job it’s something that can be very painful.  It’s also very painful when you’re a youngster because I was only twenty five years old when we started to do the due diligence of Coca Cola Enterprises and you’re going up face to face with the multi-millionaire who is the owner of a bottling company and you’re trying to explain where things are going and it’s kind of like “over my dead body” kind of a discussion. 

 

Jim Rembach:     I could definitely see where many people, especially in certain parts of this country with people who have had that cloud many of those families held those distribution things for a couple of generations. And you would have provably felt that is was warranted to make you a dead body.

 

Jack Bergstrand:       Yeah, I mean they always had all the cards. It’s probably—looking back at the whole thing and the system continues to restructure and has recently gone through another iteration but it’s really—I think one of the classic case studies of a system developed back in the late 1800 that was enormously successful and the hardest model to break as we go through—on the book itself is one that has worked for you in the past. And so when you have these families who have been extremely successful and then you got these what they consider to be empty suits coming in trying to tell you, it really could be done a lot better if you just did it differently, it’s really a very hard thing to sell. 

 

Jim Rembach:     I think there’s probably many people who are sitting here today listening to this and saying, I got that now, what do you mean 1800 generations? So you talk about the work that you’re doing now, you have the book and promoting a book can be a full time effort in itself too if you want to make an impact with it, but when you start thinking about one goal that you would have regardless of what it may be personal or professional what is it?

 

Jack Bergstrand:       You know for me it really is to tell other people how to help ease their cross functional teams and leaders to do truly great things more systematically. Because at the end of the day I’ve seen enough projects that didn’t work and the grim looks on people’s faces and sometimes people failing for factors beyond their control and nobody wants to work a year or two years on something and not have it succeed. And it’s so much more fun to succeed and it’s quite possible to do it better, faster and to do it with much more energy. And since projects are essentially the common denominator of how companies move forward and the things that they work on. To get that right or at least even get it better can help people take a lot of the empty calories out of their job, make their job more fun, and then actually make their lives more fun too. Because if you’re productive on projects that you’re working on chances are you’re going to have more time to things other than that. 

 

Jim Rembach:        And the Fast Leader legion wishes you the very best. Now before we move on let’s get a quick word from our sponsor.

 

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Jim Rembach:        Alright here we go Fast Leader legion it’s time for the Hump Day Hoedown. Okay, Jack, the Hump Day Hoedown is the part of our show where you give us good insights fast. I’m going to ask you several questions and your job is to give us a robust yet rapid response that are going to help us move onward and upward faster. Jack Bergstrand, are you ready to hoedown? 

 

Jack Bergstrand:       I give ‘em my best. 

 

Jim Rembach:      What do you think is holding you back from being an even better leader today?

 

Jack Bergstrand:       Every time I resist letting go of the tried and true, I usually get hurt. 

 

Jim Rembach:      What is the best leadership advice you have ever received?

 

Jack Bergstrand:       That it doesn’t cost anything to be nice to somebody buy it can sure cost you if you’re not.

 

Jim Rembach:      What is one of your secrets that you believe contributes to your success? 

 

Jack Bergstrand:       Never ever, ever give up. 

 

Jim Rembach:      What do you feel is one of your best tools that helps you lead in business or life?

 

Jack Bergstrand:       Strategic profiling. 

 

Jim Rembach:      What would be one book that you’d recommend to our legion, it could be from any genre, and of course we’ll put a link to—The Velocity Advantage, on your show notes page as well. 

 

Jack Bergstrand:       Certainly beyond the Velocity Advantage, I think Drucker’s book The Effective Executive is something that’s a very valuable book for anybody of any age at any time. 

 

Jim Rembach:      Okay, Fast Leader legion, you can find links to that and other bonus information from today’s show by going to fastleader.net/jackbergstrand. Okay, Jack, this is my last hump day hoedown question: Imagine you were given the opportunity to go back to the age of 25. And you’ve been given the opportunity to take the knowledge and skills that you have now back with you but you can’t take everything back you can only choose one. So what skill or knowledge would you take back with you and why?

 

Jack Bergstrand:       The one thing for me would be empathy. When I was 25 I was the head of marketing for Coca Cola Bottling Company of New England, we had the largest advertising budget in metro Boston. We had our McCann Ericson agency and I thought I was pretty hot stuff and I thought that I knew quite a bit. I have a lot of regrets when I look back to when I was 25 because I tended to take no prisoners I kind of interpreted questions as defiance and the truth is had I just listen a little more and maybe spend a little bit more time trying to understand where somebody else is coming from and a little bit more time explaining what I was trying to achieve then everyone would have been better off including me. 

 

Jim Rembach:      Jack, was an honor to spend time with you today. Can you please share with the Fast Leader legion how they can connect with you?

 

Jack Bergstrand:       You can connect with me at jbergstrand@cnsqnt.com and I answer all my emails. 

 

Jim Rembach:      Jack Bergstrand, thank you for sharing your knowledge and wisdom the Fast Leader legion honors you and thanks you for helping us get over the hump. Woot! Woot! 

 

Thank you for joining me on the Fast Leader show today. For recaps, links, from every show special offers and access to download and subscribe, if you haven’t already, head on over the fastleader.net so we can help you move onward and upward faster. 

 

END OF AUDIO