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Doug Sandler - Nice Guys Finish First

173: Doug Sandler: I had no system and that’s the problem

Doug Sandler Show Notes Page

Doug Sandler was hired to be a DJ at a party hundreds of miles from his home. He was feeling on top of his game but within 15-minutes of the four-hour event, he realized why he was really hired sight unseen. He also realized that everything he had done in his career to that point was just about being lucky.

Doug Sandler grew up in Baltimore Maryland with his older brother David, his parents split when he was 2 years old.

He remembers growing up and loving life as a little kid…even though they had no money, they laughed and enjoyed life. His mom has been a huge inspiration in his life. Although he was not close personally with his dad, he was a strong influence in my business life. His life was cut short in his mid-60’s and he still follows the advice that he thinks his dad would be providing even to this day.

Doug has always had a love for the the service aspect of any job. From food service in college to the mortgage business when out of college, real estate, DJ, podcaster, author, blogger, speaker.

Doug Sandler is an entrepreneur and industry leader. His book, Nice Guys Finish First is a #1 ranked Amazon Best Seller.  As a podcast host of The Nice Guys on Business, Doug has interviewed Gary Vaynerchuk, Arianna Huffington from HuffPost, Dan Harris from Good Morning America, Ron Klain, White House Chief of Staff and dozens of celebs. Doug is a nationally recognized speaker, writer, and founder of TurnKey Podcast Company, providing podcast production, editing and launch services.

The legacy Doug wants to leave behind is that nice guys finish first.

He currently lives in the Washington, DC area with his wife Danielle and 2 kids Adam and Rachel.

Tweetable Quotes and Mentions

Listen to @djdoug to get over the hump on the @FastLeaderShow Click to Tweet 

“You do have the right, when you are working for another organization to follow what you love.” -Doug Sandler Click to Tweet

“You can still have a wonderful life working for someone else.” -Doug Sandler Click to Tweet 

“You can be a nice guy, you can be vulnerable, you can be empathetic and show gratitude without being a doormat.” -Doug Sandler Click to Tweet 

“Those tapes that are going off in your head telling you once you’re down to stay down, you’ve got to erase those tapes.” -Doug Sandler Click to Tweet 

“You’ve got to put yourself in a position to win every time.” -Doug Sandler Click to Tweet 

“It’s not the circumstances that life is going to deliver to you, it’s how you handle the circumstances in your life.” -Doug Sandler Click to Tweet 

“We’re all dealing with the exact same scenarios, we are all given the same opportunities.” -Doug Sandler Click to Tweet 

“It’s just a matter of how we respond to the circumstance we are dealt in our life.” -Doug Sandler Click to Tweet 

“You can say ‘no’ and be a nice guy.” -Doug Sandler Click to Tweet 

“The negativity is certainly exposed a lot more often than ever now because of social media.” -Doug Sandler Click to Tweet 

“People give themselves a mental enema almost every day on social media and share the crap that’s going on in their life.” -Doug Sandler Click to Tweet 

“The good in the world is shared a lot more now.” -Doug Sandler Click to Tweet 

“That person in customer service now represents the entire brand to the person they’re dealing with.” -Doug Sandler Click to Tweet 

“Even as a nice guy, I still have negativity in my life.” -Doug Sandler Click to Tweet 

“Social media and technology make it so easy for us to complain.” -Doug Sandler Click to Tweet 

“Instead of being so negative and critical of everyone, I challenge you to find something they’re doing right and compliment them.” -Doug Sandler Click to Tweet 

“When the negative thing happens you’ve just have to remember all of that positivity that’s come back.” -Doug Sandler Click to Tweet 

“Don’t let that negative action put you in a period of stinkin’ thinkin’.” -Doug Sandler Click to Tweet 

“So, what do you do to differentiate yourself, it’s all going to be in the service and support.” -Doug Sandler Click to Tweet 

“Instead of letting life happen to me, you have to make life happen to you.” -Doug Sandler Click to Tweet 

“Always stay in action, don’t let life happen to you.” -Doug Sandler Click to Tweet 

“You’ve got to staying in your zone of genius.” -Doug Sandler Click to Tweet 

Hump to Get Over

Doug Sandler was hired to be a DJ at a party hundreds of miles from his home. He was feeling on top of his game but within 15-minutes of the four-hour event, he realized why he was really hired sight unseen. He also realized that everything he had done in his career to that point was just about being lucky.

Advice for others

Keep moving.

Holding him back from being an even better leader

Staying in the grove. Stay in your zone of genius.

Best Leadership Advice

Fail fast, and it’s okay to fail.

Secret to Success

Just return your phone calls.

Best tools that helps in Business or Life

The microphone.

Recommended Reading

Nice Guys Finish First

Who Moved My Cheese?: An Amazing Way to Deal with Change in Your Work and in Your Life

Contacting Doug Sandler

website: http://www.dougsandler.com/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/djdoug

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/doug-sandler-1a346649/

Resources and Show Mentions

Call Center Coach

Empathy Mapping

 

Show Transcript: 

[expand title=”Click to access edited transcript”]

173: Doug Sandler: I had no system and that’s the problem

 

Intro: Welcome to the Fast Leader Podcast, where we explore convenient yet effective shortcuts that will help you get ahead and move forward faster by becoming a better leader. And now here’s your host, customer and employee engagement expert and certified emotional intelligence practitioner, Jim Rembach.

 

Call center coach develops and unites the next generation of call center leaders. Through our e-learning and community individuals gain knowledge and skills in the six core competencies that is the blueprint that develops high-performing call center leaders. Successful supervisors do not just happen so go to callcentercoach.com to learn more about enrollment and download your copy of the Supervisor Success Path e-book now.

 

Jim Rembach:   Okay, Fast Leader legion, today I’m excited because I get the opportunity to really have a good discussion about something that’s kind of been bothering me for a long time about being nice but not too nice. Doug Sandler grew up in Baltimore, Maryland with his older brother David. His parents split when he was two years old but Doug remembers growing up and loving life as a little kid even though they had no money they laughed and enjoyed life. His mom has been a huge inspiration in his life. Although he was not personally close to his dad he was a strong influence in his business life. His father was cut short in his mid-60s and he still follows that advice that he thinks his dad would be providing even to this day. 

 

Doug has always had a love for the service aspect of any job from food service in college to the mortgage business when he went out college real, estate, DJ, podcaster, author, blogger and speaker. Doug Sandler is an entrepreneur and an industry leader. His book, Nice Guys Finished First, is a number one ranked Amazon bestseller and has a podcast host of the Nice Guys on Business. Doug has interviewed Gary Vaynerchuk, Arianna Huffington from HuffPost, Dan Harris from Good Morning America, Ron Klain Wine House Chief of Staff and dozens of celebrities. Doug is a nationally recognized speaker, writer and founder of TurnKey Podcast Company providing podcast production, editing and launch services. The legacy Doug wants to leave behind is that nice guys finish first. 

 

He currently lives in the Washington DC area with his wife Danielle and two kids Adam and Rachel. Doug Sandler are you ready to help us get over the hump?

 

Doug Sandler:   Oh, yeah, let’s do it hump day is here. Come on Jim, let’s do it.

 

Jim Rembach:   I’m glad you’re here. 

 

Doug Sandler:   I’ve never heard a 1,500 word bio read in 32 seconds, so nicely done.

 

Jim Rembach:   I appreciate that. Now what people don’t know is I probably messed it up three or four times and I’m editing it so you hear it clean.

 

Doug Sandler:   Those of you in Jim’s community that are listening to this at one and a half or two X speed, slow it down.

 

Jim Rembach:   I’ll tell you we’re going to have a good time today. Now, I’ve given my Legion a little bit about you but can you tell us what your current passion is so that we can get to know you even better.

 

Doug Sandler:   I love the podcasting space. This new media space has been great after reinventing my career probably a handful of years ago I discovered this space and fall in love with it and there’s no better way to make money than from your pajamas. So, I do love it for that reason. 

 

Jim Rembach:   That’s a really interesting point. You and I had the opportunity to talk off mic and we talked about the prior life and how you kind of—I think many of us we should be more aware and mindful and kind of follow the money. A lot of my listeners are actually within organizations and sometimes they have to follow the money for others. But even from an individual perspective and the whole “nice guys” concept for me. When and when you start thinking about—oh! gosh, being too nice and that tipping point to where you become someone who gets walked on. I’ve always kind of struggled with that like how much is too much nice? 

 

Doug Sandler:   Yeah, Can I comment on something that you said just a moment ago first and then I’ll get into how much nice is too much nice. What you said was, a lot of people follow the money and I do agree with that people do follow. Even when they work for organizations they follow other people’s money, I guess, but what I would say is step back because you do have the right when you are working for another organization to follow still what you love. Follow what you love follow the thing that you’re passionate about and that doesn’t mean that you have to be your own person and be an entrepreneur and take all the risk. You can still have a wonderful life working for someone else within their organization. Certainly I’m not conflicting with what you’re saying but I wanted to add a yes and you can still follow what you love to do even when you work for someone else. There’s plenty of people that do that whether it’s an architecture engineer or professionalism or whatever it is that they’re doing.

 

Jim Rembach:   Yeah, I’m glad that you added that. As a matter of fact Laurie Bocklund, on the last episode, actually just talked about that yes and that she learned in her improv class.

 

Doug Sandler:   Oh, yeah, it’s the greatest. And I do feel like instead of saying but the yes end is an easy way to go. I never took improv but a lot of my friends have been through the comedy route so for me it’s very interesting to hear the yes and—and it does make you feel a little bit better when you hear, yeah and let me add this instead of, but, but, and the buts always stopped me dead in my tracks.

 

Jim Rembach:   Well, that’s an interesting point. Okay, so, we’re talking about nice and too nice but I would dare to say if you are nice you’re definitely using the yes end instead of but.

 

Doug Sandler:   Yeah, I agree. I agree. I think that now it becomes my habit not the yes end because I don’t know why those words even came in my head, I don’t think I’ve used those word for weeks or months the yes end. But let me answer the other question which is really cool, I think that as we discuss Nice Guys Finish First, it wasn’t just a book that I wrote but it’d the anti-nice guys finish last mentality. It really is you can be a nice guy you can be vulnerable you can be empathetic and show gratitude and do all of those things that I would consider being nice without being a doormat. It doesn’t mean that you’re a pushover at all it means you understand even more firmly the ground and you’re the security of the ground that you’re standing on allowing yourself to be vulnerable but still be a leader still be strong and not be stepped on.

 

Jim Rembach:   Well, that’s really interesting. As you were talking I started thinking and the word that popped in my head was values. And talking about that firm ground and knowing where you need to stand and that values component because I know for me I feel like I am a nice guy but then I’ve also let certain environments change my demeanor so it wasn’t so nice because I kind of lost sight of what my values were and got caught up in the moments. And of course, as I got older I could reflect and be able to identify those but when I was in it I didn’t necessarily do it all that well. So, how can somebody make sure that they’re always grounded well?

 

Doug Sandler:   I think you just have to understand where you are and who you are. As long as you’re comfortable with you scan those tapes that are going off in your head that tell you to once you’re down to stay down you’ve got to erase those tapes. You’ve got to put yourself in a position to win every time. You’ve got to put yourself in a position it’s not the circumstances that life is going to deliver to you, it’s how you handle the circumstances in your life that’s going to make all the difference in the world. We’re all dealing with the same exact scenarios we all are given the same the same opportunities out there. If you don’t think that you are you’re not putting yourself in a position. A lot of people say, well you’ve been lucky you’ve been able to reinvent your career and look how fast it’s going to—it hasn’t gone fast in my mind it’s so slow it feels like an overnight success in 30 years it takes you a long time to get there. Sure, I could have turned around based upon the circumstances that have happened in my life. My dad passing away in his mid-60s and I’m not having that leadership role in my life any longer. My mom becoming ill at some point everybody in my family around me having cancer and devastation I could look at that and say, my gosh there is so much, I don’t know if your show is explicit but if it’s not there’s so much poop in this world. And I look at that and say, with all this poop around there’s got to be a pony in here somewhere. And I think it’s just a matter of how we respond to the circumstances that are dealt in our life. Part of it is understanding that you can say no, be a nice guy, still say no say it gently say it with empathy say it with compassion and conviction and still have a friend on the other side of that no because they respect where you are because you’ve consistently taken action the same way throughout your entire life. And that really is what the true definition of nice to me. Consistent attitude, consistent behavior and it’s all positive.

 

Jim Rembach:   Thanks for sharing that. I also started thinking talking about that environmental component and proximity and all of those things that we have really to contend with in today’s world. I was talking to somebody the other day and I was like well I’ve actually worked out of a home office with the jobs that I’ve had in order to pass 17 years I’ve been in a home office and so sometimes the whole proximity component not being around certain people and having that negative thing constantly being on your shoulder and pressure to perform and all these things it’s kind of hard to slough those things off and really remain positive. So, when you start thinking about especially in the environment that we are today and thinking about the nice guys philosophy, values and all of that, do you think it’s declining or it’s actually growing?

 

Doug Sandler:   Well, I think because technology is so prevalent nowadays we see so much more than we have ever seen. So, I would love to be able to say I think negativity or positivity or whatever it is I can put a number on it and say it’s more prevalent now. I would tell you that the negativity is certainly exposed a lot more often than ever now because of social media. You have a problem with an organization or a leader within an organization you’re going to see it oftentimes directly on social media it give themselves a mental enema almost every day on social media and share all of the crap that’s going on in their life good bad or indifferent I’m not sure. From other perspective I think that the good in the world is shown a lot more now based upon the way that social media and the technology is out there. When a small act is rewarded or gratitude is shown through social media that’s good as well. I think that nowadays the lead-in towards being nice is definitely stronger now than it’s ever been because people realize how exposed their message and their brand is to the public. It’s so easy to get onto the computer and bash a company or say great things about them. So companies are very aware that it’s no longer Nike let’s say it’s that person in service that is dealing with Nike they now represent the entire Nike brand to that person that they’re dealing with. You better believe that there’s got to be some instructions given to that person in service and support how they have to handle or what they should be doing and how their customer service should be to that one customer.

 

Jim Rembach:   That’s interesting that you say that. For me I try to refrain—and you see it a lot in this industry that I work in which is customer care customer experience where a lot of the influencers, I won’t say a lot, some of the influencers in in the industry and experts in the industry, that word kind of has shaky ground in itself, like to videotape and then therefore on their own social platforms push out the bad experience they had at a restaurant or an airline or a retailer I try not to do that. And even when people ask me to contribute to certain things and they’re like, hey, tell us about your worst experience. And ‘m like, umm I kind of cringe when I want to do that because there’s just so much of that negativity. I would choose to rather focus in on the opportunity that exists. If we have all these things that are going on that are so negative and not customer centric and focused and what about the things that are and how do we actually get to that point? Let’s ditch the bad and focus on the good.

 

Doug Sandler:   Yeah, I mean I would like to say that I’ve never said a negative word on social media but that wouldn’t be the reality. Even as a nice guy I still have negativity that happens in my life and again I want to expose that to those that are close to me if they ask me my opinion on a particular product or I have an issue. On my show all the time and I have 600 episodes of the Nice Guys on business podcast under my belt. We’ve done plenty of negative, hey, listen this happened on this airline or this happened with this brand and we like to see how they respond. You give them an opportunity we invite people on our show all the time we invite people to respond to us on social media all the time. Some big brands tended or choose to ignore it and some big brands—I like to see where people sit because I’m in the world of customer service. For me I love putting somebody to the test and having them pass the test I’ll give them accolades if they pass the test. But I’ll also give them negative words if they don’t pass the test aren’t I important as a customer? Why? Why would my they want to ignore me I’m just a guy that has a product or service that has a—they’ve presented their product or service I have a problem with it, let’s hear what they have to say I’m curious I always curious.

 

Jim Rembach:   As you were talking I started thinking as far as the process by which you go and actually share that feedback. I remember there’s one time where I was sitting next to a guy on a flight he was just enraged the fact that he wasn’t able to be in first class and not only was he not in first class he was at the very, very back of the plane right against the bathroom, needless to say he couldn’t recline his seat and he had noise the entire trip, but I booked my flight late and it’s what I expected. He was just nasty and I’m like, do you think that would ever get you moved up?

 

Doug Sandler:   Yeah, there’s got to be that limit in your head that says, I think this is fair based upon the circumstance how much of this is me just wanting to run my mouth because I feel like I’m being anonymous in my bashing and how much of this is—if that CEO was sitting in front of me would I be okay having that conversation? The test that I run through is I’d love to have a conversation I’d love to invite that person on my show so that they could actually share why it happened this way and how we can try to resolve this from happening again. I don’t know I think it’s a very challenging thing I think that social media and technology makes it so easy for us to complain. On the other side of it, Jim, it makes it so easy for us to be able to say positive things too and we do much more of that than we do of bashing on our show. For me personally I do the same thing I love being able to share great news and great information as well.

 

Jim Rembach:   I think really that’s the key we just need to outdo what the norm is and the norm is that most people complain especially when it comes to customer service and customer experience than they do praise. Someone was talking to the other day about a letter that they received and I was actually kind of shocked and I’m like, people still do that they wrote a letter? I’m like, how old was that person? Sure enough it was someone who is of older age who was more familiar with the writing process. Every once in a while I think we do have to pull out the pen or even a pencil whatever it is and just write a note.

 

Doug Sandler:   We call it catching people in the act of doing something right. And if we can do that a little bit more often I think that you’ll have a lot—that’s all a part of that—if there’s a philosophy behind what nice is it’s showing gratitude and compassion and empathy and showing the gratitude instead of being so negative and being so critical of everyone I challenge you those that are in Jim’s community listening to this right now, when you stop listening to this episode at your office or whoever it is that you talk to next find something that they’re doing right and complement them. It’s so easy to do and it makes—it’s almost like it’s a selfish act because it makes you feel almost better than it makes them feel as well. I always want people to feel better about themselves after having had met me than before they got in my company. 

 

Jim Rembach:   I’m glad you said that. For me I think one of the best pieces of feedback that I received the other day was a video call that I had with somebody and when the call was over with and between their laughing they said I really appreciate because every time I talk to you helped me see things more clearly and it removed the worry that I have off my shoulder. To me that was the best feedback I think I could have ever received. 

 

Doug Sandler:   That’s great, yeah, that’s great. That shows that you’re in the right zone and when something negative happens to a nice guy like you or like me or like many of the tens of thousands millions of nice guys that are out there when the negative thing happens you just have to remember all of that positivity that’s come back and don’t let that negative action put you in a period of stinking thinking just stay your course and keep that nice attitude it’s all about consistency and that’s what people expect from you. 

 

Jim Rembach:   I believe it. Okay, so what we we’re talking about here we’re talking about the nice talking about really improving our emotional intelligence skills and when we want to do that as an organization but that that path a lot of times we need to have beacons of light and one of the things that we look at on the show as a beacon of light are quotes.  Is there a quote or two that you can share?

 

Doug Sandler:   Sure. I don’t remember I think it might have been Henry—I can’t remember who said this, whether you think you can or you can’t you’re right. I’m trying to remember who it was that said that. It’s so true all of the things that we want to accomplish in life whether it’s personal or professional if you think that you can—maybe it was Dale Carnegie, I can’t remember. If you put your head in the right position and you think that you can do it you absolutely will be able to do it. If you’re negative about it and you don’t think that you can do it the same task you’re not going to be able to accomplish it.

 

Jim Rembach:   As you were talking I started thinking about my—and I’ve mentioned him before, my oldest son,  is that he’s more motivated by fear and so a lot of the things that will come out of his mouth are negative and that’s what happens when you kind of got have that fear wiring. I keep telling him I’m like, whatever comes out of your mouth is what you are. He’s like, what do you mean? I said, well, if you talk about negative things you become negative. I said, if you talk about other people in a bad way you become that. Whatever comes out of— he says, that’s just dumb. And I said you’re reinforcing through your head whatever you’re going to end up feeling. And sooner or later maybe it’ll click for him.

 

Doug Sandler:   The quote was a Henry Ford quote, I quickly looked it up and it is a Henry Ford quote. 

 

Jim Rembach:   Good job, the beauty of the Internet at your fingertips. I am reading your bio and you talked about the pivoting you talked about all of those things. To get to where you are today I’m sure there was a lot of humps that you had to get over, can you share a story with us so that we can hopefully get over our own?

 

Doug Sandler:   Sure absolutely. There’s a couple that come to mind and one of them which was really the creation of many of the conscious thought of this nice guys system that I’ve created over the last 30 plus years but really instituted within the last handful of years. I spent the last 30 years as a as a DJ. This this family hired me sight unseen to fly down from D.C. down to New Orleans to do their son’s celebration. I can recall very vividly getting down there they paid my bill they carted me from everywhere my ego was so in the way right now because I felt like they really were engaging my services. Within 50 minutes of this four hour event I remember setting up and they took me to the venue and the guest was like 75 or so adults and fifty or so I would call them kids but they weren’t any kids I’ve ever seen before they were more like monsters. So within 15 minutes of this four hour event they had managed to suck the helium out of every balloon threw pea soup on the walls they were drinking at the bar at 13 years old they lit toilet paper on fire in the bathrooms and this is all within 1/16th of the of the event 15 minutes into this four hour event. And I did what I thought any self-respecting entertainer or DJ would do at the time I put my head down and focused on my job and I started playing music. And of course I was playing music basically to a rowdy room of kids that would not respond no matter what I did. 

 

What I discovered during that pivotal moment in my life was had I actually invested a little bit of time and energy and resources in this client I would have discovered that this was not only the 49th of 50 events of these kids had been to that year through there, let’s call it the bar mitzvah circuit, but no matter what I did they wouldn’t respond positively and my feeling was why were they doing this to me? So, I invested no time, energy, resources in this client they had gone to so many events they didn’t hire me because they thought I was a good entertainer they hired me because I was so far geographically out of their area that there was no way that I possibly would have ever heard of these kids. And so you completely take a shift and you say why didn’t I just ask some important questions? Well, somebody might say, well, why didn’t they tell you? They don’t know what to tell me and what not to tell me I was the professional. So that’s the invest component of my program and actually inspired them to take action come up with a plan A and plan B in case this particular—I knew enough to know that that potentially could happen but it didn’t arm them with any plans. And then I had actually executed a plan I mean I wanted to execute some of those kids but I had actually executed a plan I would have carried out these plans perfectly. For me everything that I did in my in my career so far I was just getting lucky until I created this invest, inspire, and execute system I’d never realized that there was actually a system I could have put in place for that.

 

Jim Rembach:   I love that story that’s pretty good. They actually have to go outside of their geographic region, right?

 

Doug Sandler:   Right. Totally right.

 

Jim Rembach:   Listening to that I kind of started thinking that, well, part of that is just wisdom. You have to go through the experience in order to know that you needed to come up with the system so that it didn’t happen again. 

 

Doug Sandler:   Well, yeah, or you’re a guy that’s smart enough as I wasn’t at the time, and yes probably things going on all around me right now to know that I should be plugging into a system I had no system and that’s the problem. There was no consistent effort there was no phone calls there was no returns of voicemails there was it was like I would just do whatever I thought I wanted to do in order to get the next job I was so focused on the transaction and not focused on the relationship that it wasn’t good.

 

Jim Rembach:   That kind of—is where a lot of organizations start in addition to that they continue to do that way and then they ultimately become one of those organizations that becomes affected because somebody disrupted them.

 

Doug Sandler:   When your services begin to be a commodity because all you’re doing is going through the same action that everybody else is going through and the proof in the pudding for that business, for my entertainment my DJ business, is that I outlasted. I was 30 years into the business I’ve just recently within the last handful of years reinvented myself and what’s so great about it is that the majority of my competition or guys in their 20s and 30s–I’m 15 or 20 years older than them and five to ten times more expensive than many of those guys that are in maybe three to ten times expensive more than many of those guys that are in my market. I know it is not coincidence it’s understanding what customer service means it’s understanding how to invest that time and energy and your client and resources in your client understanding how to execute a plan. It’s not about playing music at a four-hour event it’s the year and a half that leads up to that event where you can build a relationship that’s the critical component of that business. 

 

Jim Rembach:   That’s interesting you to say that, I started thinking about differentiation you can choose how to differentiate because the fact is you need to do that how you are going to go about doing that. If you differentiate by product that’s a risky proposition these days. When you start talking about the fact that anybody can come and knock you out anywhere around the globe to me the smart choice is to differentiate on the entire experience component.

 

Doug Sandler:   Well, you have to. When you have two people that you’re never going to compare exactly apples to apples especially in the entertainment world if you have a commodity, a light bulb is a light bulb, so what do you do to differentiate yourself from someone that wants to buy from you? It’s all going to be in the service and the support. In my particular case, yeah, we still have to be able to do a great job on event day but the challenge is most people think it is about job day it’s about the celebration. Let me give you an example, two years before an event I’ve met with a guy and his wife and they’re designing this wonderful celebration. The host name is Jim and all the way through the process I’m calling the guy Jim and I know it’s Jim, and I know it I own that name. I get to event day and I’m introducing them and I say, welcome to the stage John, okay, so I’ve screwed that up.  On Monday morning, my agent is not going to get a call that says, he didn’t even know my freakin’ name. Because it was an honest mistake and we got it and I built a relationship. Now let’s take a slightly different track, I don’t call this guy and I’ll talk to Jim I don’t know anything about Jim on event day I just show up and I’m about to do Jim and Jan’s job. They’re about to be introduced and I say welcome to the stage John. On Monday morning my agent is going to get a phone call saying, you didn’t even take the time to learn my name. Okay, honest error, honest thing happened same exact end result except the different relationship was built on the first scenario as opposed to the second scenario. I’m going to swim through that first scenario, I’m going to sing on that second scenario.

 

Jim Rembach:   That’s true. You’ve got to invest in it, right? When I start thinking about where you’ve come and where you are I would suspect that even with a lot of the organizations that you’re working with a lot of individuals that you’re focusing in on, the family, you’ve got a lot of  things that you can look at from a goal perspective. If there was one that you had to choose from what would it be?

 

Doug Sandler:   I would say one of the goals is set goals. I think one of the critical opponents of this reinvention that I went through in 2013 when I discovered that I was not going to be a DJ until I was in my 70s and I couldn’t imagine spending my time doing the cha-cha slide in the cupid shuffle at 65   years old on the dance floor I needed to set a goal and I needed to take action. Instead of letting life happen to me you have to make life happen to you I set not only a practical goal of where I’m heading with my life but I set out a plan. This is what I wanted to do and it’s a jumbled mess along the way looking back but still this whole reinvention has been wonderful. So, I would say put yourself in a position where you do set some goals for where you want to go. Examine the goals frequently readjust if you need to and keep moving forward but always stay in action and just don’t let life happen to you because if it does it’s never going to take you in the path that you wanted to. 

 

Jim Rembach:   That’s so true. And the Fast Leader legion wishes you the very best. Now before we move on let’s get a quick word from our sponsor.

 

The number one thing that contributes to customer loyalty is emotion. So move onward and upward faster by gaining significantly deeper insight and understanding of your customer journey and personas with emotional intelligence. With your empathy mapping workshop you’ll learn how to evoke and influence the right customer emotions that generate improve customer loyalty and reduce your cost to operate. Get over your emotional hump now by going to empathymapping.com to learn more. 

 

Jim Rembach:   Alright, here we go Fast Leader legion it’s time for the Hump Day Hoedown. Okay, Michael, the Hump day hoedown is the part of our show where you give us good insights fast. So I’m going to ask you several questions and your job is to give us robust yet rapid responses that are going to help us move onward and upward faster. Doug Sandler, are you ready to hoedown? 

 

Doug Sandler:   Okay, let’s go. 

 

Jim Rembach:   What do you think is holding you back from being an even better leader today? 

 

Doug Sandler:   Staying in the groove. You just got to stay in your zone of genius. Once you start slipping out of that you become less effective much less productive and you slow yourself down. So stay in your zone of genius.

 

Jim Rembach:   What is the best leadership advice you have ever received? 

 

Doug Sandler:   Fail fast. It’s okay to fail. 

 

Jim Rembach:   What is one of your secrets that you believe contributes to your success?

 

Doug Sandler:   This is an easy one, just return your phone calls it’s amazing how many people don’t return their phone calls.

 

Jim Rembach:   What do you feel is one of your best tools that helps you lead in business or life?

 

Doug Sandler:   Let’s see, I’m going to say the microphone. Because I’m in a podcast environment so I would say that tool I could not deal without. 

 

Jim Rembach:   What would be one book that you’d recommend to our listeners and it could be from any genre, and of course, we’re going to put a link to, Nice Guys Finished First on your show notes page as well. 

 

Doug Sandler:   Thanks Jim, I always promote this book because I think it’s so wonderful with its parable, the way that it’s written, Who Moved my Cheese, by Spencer Johnson. 

 

Jim Rembach:   Okay, Fast Leader legion you can find links to that and other bonus information from today’s show by going to fastleader.net/dougsandler. Okay, Doug, this is my last Hump Day Hoedown question: Imagine you were given the opportunity go back to the age of 25. And you’ve been given the opportunity to take the knowledge and skills that you have now back with you but you can’t take everything back you can only choose one. So what skill or piece of knowledge would you take back with you and why? 

 

Doug Sandler:   I’d say that it would be more of a piece of advice it’s, keep moving. You want   to keep moving you can’t stay still nothing ever stays the same you’re constantly evolving and as long as you keep moving make decisions never have a doubt about the decisions you made just keep moving forward that would be any advice that I would give myself at 25. 

 

Jim Rembach:     Doug it was an honor to spend time with you today, can you please share with the Fast Leader legion how they can connect with you?

 

Doug Sandler:   The best way to reach me is just through my website which is dougsandler.com. 

 

Jim Rembach:     Doug Sandler, thank you for sharing your knowledge and wisdom the Fast Leader legion honors you and thanks you for helping us get over the hump. Woot! Woot!

 

Jim Rembach:   Thank you for joining me on the Fast Leader show today. For recaps, links from every show, special offers and access to download and subscribe, if you haven’t already head on over the fastleader.net so we can help you move onward and upward faster. 

 

END OF AUDIO 

 

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045: Art Sobczak: I was not a good employee

Art Sobczak Show Notes

Art Sobczak started a business with a partner at the early age of 22. After a short time, his partner went on to law school and Art tried to keep the business. Struggling to make enough income, Art decided to take a job while trying to build his business. Art still struggled, but income was no longer the problem. Listen to Art tell his story of failing and learning to get over the hump and move onward and upward.

Art has not grown up yet, but he was born and raised in Omaha, Nebraska. Where at 14 years old, Art landed his first paid sales job, on the phone selling tickets to the police fundraising circus. All through high school and college Art held a variety of jobs that allowed him to sit in the comfort of an office, making money for others, and himself, simply by talking on the phone.

Art also had a weekend job during his four years of college, as a disc jockey for a mobile music company, playing over 400 wedding receptions and parties during that time, further enhancing his speaking and persuasion skills. His sales and speaking trend continued after college in corporate sales positions with the original AT&T, and with a division of American Express.

Since forming his company, Business By Phone Inc. in 1983, Art has helped hundreds of thousands of salespeople–and those who might not have considered themselves being in sales–to generate untold millions of dollars and extraordinary success by saying and doing the right things by phone using conversational, non-salesy methods.

When he’s not working or traveling for business, he’s likely traveling to or at a sporting event, golfing, or feeding his passion for cooking. In fact, Art has been a competitive barbecue cook for 20 years, and has won several championships.

Tweetable Quotes and Mentions

Listen to @ArtSobczak and get over the hump on the @FastLeaderShow Click to Tweet 

“We all have to take risks or else we’re not going to achieve anything of significance.” Click to Tweet

“Risk and attitude are necessary for success.” Click to Tweet 

“Billions of words have been written and spoken about the importance of attitude.” Click to Tweet 

“The way you feel affects your performance.” Click to Tweet 

“I was a great salesperson but not a good employee.” Click to Tweet 

“If I’m really going to have the impact that I want to have…I’ve got to do my own deal.” Click to Tweet 

“Let’s face it, life is based on action.” Click to Tweet 

“Take an interest in others and put what you want to the side.” Click to Tweet 

“What has to come before recommendations, is information.” Click to Tweet 

“Be more interested in other people than yourself.” Click to Tweet 

“Everybody is born a salesperson.” Click to Tweet 

“In any profession there are people who are the crooks and shysters.” Click to Tweet 

“Selling, when done professionally is the greatest profession in the world.” Click to Tweet 

“You really can’t force somebody to do something that they really don’t want to do.” Click to Tweet 

“I will never lose the passion to accomplish something and to make a difference.” Click to Tweet 

“Everybody needs a purpose.” Click to Tweet 

“When you coast, you only coast one way and that’s downhill.” Click to Tweet 

“I have to kick myself in the butt every so often…to make sure I’m motivated.” Click to Tweet

“Take personal responsibility for everything that you do.” Click to Tweet 

“Be curious and always be learning.” Click to Tweet 

“Think a little bit bigger in every situation.” Click to Tweet 

Hump to Get Over

Art Sobczak started a business with a partner at the early age of 22. After a short time, his partner went on to law school and Art tried to keep the business. Struggling to make enough income, Art decided to take a job while trying to build his business. Art still struggled, but income was no longer the problem. Listen to Art tell his story of failing and learning to get over the hump and move onward and upward.

Advice for others

Take an interest in others and put what you want to the side.

Holding him back from being an even better leader

At times, I get a little too comfortable and begin to coast. And when you coast, you only coast one way and that’s downhill.

Best Leadership Advice Received

Take personal responsibility for everything you do.

Secret to Success

Be curious and always be learning.

Best tools that helps in business or Life

The internet.

Recommended Reading

Sell or Be Sold: How to Get Your Way in Business and in Life

To Sell Is Human: The Surprising Truth About Moving Others

Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion, Revised Edition

Contacting Art

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/artsob

Twitter: https://twitter.com/ArtSobczak

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ArtSobczak/

Blog: http://justplacethecall.com/

Resources

Free ebook: 501 Sales Telephone Tips

Show Transcript: 

[expand title=”Click to access edited transcript”]

045: Art Sobczak: I was not a good employee

Intro: Welcome to the Fast Leader Podcast, where we uncover the leadership like hat that help you to experience, break out performance faster and rocket to success. And now here’s your host, customer and employee engagement expert and certified emotional intelligence practitioner, Jim Rembach.

“Developing your company’s talent and leadership pipeline can be an overwhelming task but your burn is over with ResultPal you can use the power of practice to develop more leaders faster. Move onward and upward by going to resultpal.com/fast in getting a $750 performance package for free.”

Jim Rembach:    I really excited to talk and share the guest that I have with you today because he’s been a long time mentor of mine from a distance and I just recently reached out to him because of me being able to have really this medium to do it in the Fast Leader show and I am so excited to have art subject on the show today. Art since he hasn’t grown up yet but he was born and raised in Omaha, Nebraska. At 14 years old he landed his first paid sales job on the phone selling tickets to the police fundraising circus. All through high school and college are held a variety of jobs that allowed him to sit in the comfort of an office making money for others and himself simply by talking on the phone.

Art also had a weekend job during his four years of college as a disc jockey for a mobile music company playing over 400 wedding receptions and parties during that time further enhancing is speaking and persuasion skills. His sales and speaking trend continued after college and corporate sales positions with the original AT&T and with the division of American Express. Since forming his company Business By Phone Inc. in 1983, Art has helped hundreds of thousands of salespeople and those who might not have considered themselves being in sales to generate untold millions of dollars in extraordinary success by saying and doing the right things by phone using conversational non-sales method. 

When he’s not working or traveling for business is likely traveling to or at sporting events, golfing or feeding his passion for cooking, in fact, Art has been a competitive barbecue cook for 20 years and has won several championships. Art Sobczak, are you ready to help us get over the hump?

Art Sobczak:    I am Jim. Thank you, it is my pleasure to be here today, and thank you for that great introduction it reminded me somethings about my past and my recent past which included traveling to the World Series to see my Kansas City Royals win the world championships, so I’m really still on the high about that. 

Jim Rembach:    No kidding, go Royals. I’ve given our legions a little bit about you but can you tell us what your current passion is so that we can get to know you even better? 

Art Sobczak:    You did touch on my current passions, you’ve got personal passions and you have business passions. On the personal side, most definitely I’m a passionate cook and I have been doing the barbecue thing competitively for about 20 years but I really cook everything and start watching TV when all the people talk about reality shows and everything else they watch. I’m normally watching cooking shows or involved taking cooking classes online, I just invested one the other day, so it’s really tough for me to go to a restaurant and look at the menu and say, “I don’t know what I get here that I couldn’t make better for myself.” I know that sounds kind of arrogant but that truly is a passion.

On the personal side, I’m not professional side even though I’ve been doing a long time helping salespeople say and do the right things by phone, it’s still  truly is a passion. I really get no greater joy than working with salespeople and seeing their aha moments and seeing them succeed and hearing them succeed when they’re overcoming their hump of being fearful of picking up the phone, talking to a higher level decision-maker, dealing with the resistance that everybody gets. I don’t think that will ever go away and hopefully they will never go away and that’s still what I do every day, and I doubt if I would ever retire because  I’ll still do that in some form partly because I’m unemployable. [Laugh]

Jim Rembach:    I don’t know about that Art, maybe it’s that other passion of not wanting to be employed but meaning all those passions are keeping you busy and that’s fantastic. So, I know for you—I can’t think of how many posts and articles and things like that I’ve read of yours but like had even mentioned is that, it’s really conversational, it’s the non-sales piece trying to engage instead of push and I think we all can learn from that. Dan Pink came out with a book that talks about everybody being in sales whether you think you are or not. So, another reason why I wanted to have you on the show is that everybody needs to realize that, look were all in sales and a lot of us if we’re not writing something to try to connect with others were definitely speaking it whether it’s on a webinar and getting recorded or on a video like we here on this podcast or trying to make that call to get in and connect, it’s so important to understand that were all in sales and it’s about connections. 

With that we have to let our passions that drive us, even talking about—I know that a lot of those barbecue guys they’re pulling 24-hour shifts in order to make sure that their meat comes out so that they can win their championship, there’s a lot of passion that drives that, and we look at quotes on the Fast Leader show as through one of the things that drives us, is there a quote or two that drives you?

Art Sobczak:    There are, there are and these two I really have followed since an early age. The first one I first heard I was a junior in high school and the principle of the of the high school I went to in Omaha at an assembly sure this quotes from John F. Kennedy and he said, “Only those who dare to fail greatly will ever achieve greatly.” At that moment I still recall 5 years ago sitting in that assembly room hearing that and it was just like a slap upside the head and I thought, “Wow that really resonates.” And from that moment forward I put that into practice including probably several weeks after where I took a big leap and decided to run for the student government for the next year and put myself out in front of my first big speech ever inform of a thousand kids in campaign as to why I should get elected and it worked and I did and continue to follow and lived that quote. Let’s face it we all have to take risks or else we’re not going to really achieve anything of significance, so that really has to do with risk which is necessary for success. 

And then the other thing that is necessary for success is attitude. Obviously millions if not billions of words have been written and spoken about the importance of attitude, and it is true, particularly in sales but life in general. And I tell salespeople that there are probably no other profession where the way you feel effects your performance as much as is being in sales. Let’s  face it people in accounting or HR could probably come in maybe half hung over and feeling like they’re still put out a passable spreadsheet but in sales we really can do that, so the quote that that I have lived and shared with countless, hundreds of thousands of people is from Henry Ford and that is, “If you think you can or you can’t you’re always right, You think you can or you can you’re always right” and I’m not sure this on I’ve coached my kids, sports teams and I’ve shared it with salespeople and just really anybody in general, it’s like the little engine that could. 

I would say those two, if people just follow those two premises they’re well on the way to extraordinary success. I think that’s a great point. My oldest son, he loves the two words ‘I can’t’ and I tell, “You know what, every single time you say that you’re absolutely correct, now do you want to be correct? And he pause a little bit and maybe that’s something that he’ll be able to overcome as he gets older and develops that front part of his brain and can realize that he’s creating his own destiny when he does that. You talk about failing and failing big, and we look at those as learning opportunities on the show because they’re just that. Science has proven over and over that we learn the most when we do fail, that’s how we learn. Even when we’re babies when we can’t get that touch thing right and we can grab that cheerio and we keep failing, we keep trying, we learn how to manipulate it and move it and do other things in order to be able to get it to our mouth and reach our goal we have to fail. We have humps that we need to get over, can you think about a time when you have to get over a hump and it really helped you know take off the next time?

Art Sobczak:    Yeah. I was thinking about this a little bit prior to the program and it isn’t  necessary so much as one isolated instance in failure but it would definitely was, as relates to failure, but it was definitely a hump. When I first started my business, and like a lot of small businesses you’re not ordinarily successful to start out with, I started my business pretty young I was 22 years old and left the friendly womb of corporate America. I was a great salesperson but not a good employee and I always do and I wanted to do my own thing. 

So, I left with a partner and we started this consulting and training firm and we weren’t making a ton of money, my partner wasn’t married at time I was, so he was the one that was taking most of the revenue out and because I had somebody to help support me I wasn’t. Then he left and went to law school so I had the business but still not making as much I would’ve wanted as luck would have it. I had a client that wanted to hire me mostly full-time to run there inside sales, set up their inside sales, and I decided to take that on which then put me back into a quasi-job type of situation still keeping the business and some of the things on the side.  

And then what happened from there is that I got recruited away by another company which was a division of American Express to sell for them as opposed to doing everything including operation, I’m a salesperson at heart I’m not an operations guide, so decided to take that position and now I find myself again working and making more money that I’ve ever made in my life but I still had my passion for my business and now I’m essentially working almost two full-time jobs.

Then what happened with that company is that they promoted me into another position which is the director level position were I’m now running marketing programs and it reminded me of why I hated that corporate life and at the same time I’m thinking that if I’m really going to have the impact that I want to have and if I want to accomplish what I’m going to accomplish in life I’m going to do my own deal full-time, and that was the hump. I decided I’m going to make this leap again similarly to what I’ve made a few years ago, it wasn’t as big of a leap this time because at least I had the infrastructure in place for a business and had more experience and, geez now I’m was 25 as opposed to being 22 I was grizzled old veteran by this point. 

Again going back to quote, I was daring to fail great a leap again to succeed greatly. And again taking the risk and taking that step, I’m sure there’s a million quotes I’m action but one the one thing that has to be there in addition to the attitude and being able to take the risk is actually pulling the trigger and taking that action because, let’s face it life is based on action. So, I took that step and never looked back since then. 

Jim Rembach:    Well, I know that you’ve had a lot of ups and downs of the economy because that’s what happens with sales, when you think about your consulting practice, I know recently you just moved offices and have done a few things, so it’s a whole lot of ebbing and flowing and all that happens when you start taking that leap, but if you’re to think about one piece of advice that you would give to the Fast Leader Legion from all that you’ve learned over that, what would it be?

Art Sobczak:     One piece of advice, Oh, I’m not really good at just one piece of advice, let me put it in terms of just having success and having an impact with people in general. I would say that would be taking interest in others and put what you want to decide, here another famous quote I use all the time from Zig Ziglar “You can get whatever you want in life by helping enough other people get what they want.” That is really the basis for professional sales and when salespeople don’t do well it’s because they are more interested in selling what they want to sell as opposed to what the other person wants to buy. We can break that down further and say logistically, how does that manifest itself? And it really is asking questions before we make our recommendation. And I really like to use the word presentation in sales because that implies, “I’m going to be doing most of the talking” so I like to always call it recommendation since what has come before recommendation is information and making it all about the other person. 

In my training programs we spend the first part of it crawling inside the minds of other people. Who are the people that were talking to? What’s their position and their job in life? What do they want? What do they want to avoid? And then taking what we have, how can we help them accomplish that? And then from there we formulate the questioning strategy that we need to use in order to uncover that information. So, again it sounds simplistic but like a lot of success principles they work that is be more interested in other people than yourself.

Jim Rembach:     You know Art, as you were talking and explaining and teaching that is, I started thinking too about a lot of the internal work that takes place with the cross functional teams and all project work that has to happen in order to do whatever you want to do. And you have to internally sell your idea, you have to internally essentially get people to give their time to focus in on whatever you need to accomplish, so that that selling activity is universal as well not just from the perspective of, ‘Yes, I am sales and I can sell siding or I can sell financial services or I can sell medical supplies but not I also have to sell ideas’ and I think that works universally.

Art Sobczak:     Oh, yeah, absolutely. We’re going back to what you had said before about kids, everybody is born a salesperson and anybody who has kids, of course everybody has been a kid, we’re all born salespeople what happens is that some people just get out of it as far as being their formal title but every kid knows how to be curious, ask questions, their persistence, they certainly aren’t afraid to ask for what they’re not deterred- by the no’s, in a lot of our cases even when you have grown kids like I do they still know how to ask for the money.

Jim Rembach:     I think that happen once they realize what money is [Laugh] I think they start doing that and so they’re trained by the time they got out of the house quite well. 

Art Sobczak:     You’re absolutely right. Whenever somebody says, “Oh, boy I’m just not a salesperson” what they’re really saying is I’m probably not that good at it. But Grant Cardone has a book, I forget the title, but it’s something to the effect of life is sales, it’s Sell or be Sold he’s got a great quote in there, he said that life is on commission if you really think about it. Commission in terms of either monetary or whatever reward that you’re looking for. Again the best way to get anything is to step back and say who is this person? What do they want? If you’re looking for your spouse or your companion to go to dinner, instead of saying, I want to go here let’s think in terms of, okay, what do they like and not like as it relates to what I want to go and what questions can I ask them to get them to think it’s got to be their idea, sounds a little manipulative doesn’t it? 

That’s a great point that you bring up. A lot of people start having that squirmy feeling when you start talking in that manner but you have to look where it’s coming from. So what’s the intent? Is the intent to connect and build a deeper bond or is it to manipulate and just get your own way? I think where your values come, where your values are, what your focus is, you’re your vision, mission and all those things start coming into play, so what’s inside of you. I think that’s where a lot of people get those things really mixed up. 

Yeah, unfortunately sales had such a bad reputation and that’s a result of the salespeople out there again, who are placing their intentions or their wants ahead of what the customer wants at all costs. Obviously in any profession there are people who are the crooks and the shysters and the scammers, again unfortunately in our profession that probably more than most other profession. But selling itself again when done professionally is the greatest profession in the world because you really can’t force somebody to do something that they don’t want to do. And if I’m asking the right questions to get somebody to take some action and they feel like it’s something that they wanted to do anyway, we both have accomplished our objective and they feel great about it. 

Jim Rembach:     That’s very true. I know you’re still growing up and you have all the passions in  regards to sports and cooking and your business, your work teaching others, helping others, but when you start looking at all the things that you have going on, what are some of your goals?

Art Sobczak:     I’ve been in business a long time and I never will lose the passion to accomplish something and to make a difference and to me I could never see myself not having that purpose, and everybody needs a purpose. I was looking at some of the guys at my country club, their everyday is to just get up and play ten holes of golf and they go back home and watch TV and I got, “Geez, I could never, ever do that.” So, my goals are to continue what I’m doing and continue learning and a rolling out some new learning program here that we’re working on right now that could potentially be some of the biggest things that I’ve ever done. 

My goals too to continue and to continue reaching more people and helping people be better salespeople and it’s really cool to be able to work with kids right out of college who have chosen sales as a profession as opposed to what many people have done they just kind of fell into it by default because there was nothing else available. But I really, really love the fact that both the colleges and universities today are teaching something that’s useful, and that is sales as opposed to a lot of the other garbage that they’re putting in the students minds. 

Jim Rembach:     And the Fast Leader Legion wishes you the very best. Now before we move on, let’s get a quick word from our sponsor.

“A dry leadership pipeline shouldn’t clog your business from moving onward and upward. Get over the hump by filling the gap between leadership development and top performance with ResultPal. Rocket to success by going to resultpal.com/fast and getting a $750 performance package for free.” 

Alright here we go Fast Leader Legion it’s time for the—Hump Day Hoedown. Okay, Art, the Hump Day Hoedown is the part of our show where you give us good insights fast. So, I’m going to ask you several questions and your job is to give us robust yet rapid responses that are going to help us move onward and upward faster.  Art Sobczak, are you ready to hoedown? 

Art Sobczak:     Okay, let’s do it. 

Jim Rembach:     What do you think is holding you back from being an even better leader today?

Art Sobczak:     What’s holding me back is at times I get a little too comfortable. When you get too comfortable, that you’re satisfied and then you start you start to coast and you only coast one way, coast downhill. So, I have to kick myself in the butt every so often like many people do to make sure that I’m motivated every single day. 

Jim Rembach:     What is the best leadership advice you have ever received?

Art Sobczak:     Best leadership advice is to take personal responsibility for everything that you do because if you do it by example other people will follow you and if you think about it that will take care of  a lot of problems both personally, professionally and worldwide.

Jim Rembach:     What is one of your secrets that you believe contributes to your success?

Art Sobczak:     Be curious and always be learning.

Jim Rembach:     What do you feel is one of your best tools that helps you lead in business or life?

Art Sobczak:     One of my best tools is the Internet, I think it’s going to catch on. There is more information available to us at any time in history and whenever I’m in a line or anywhere, I’m one of those guys that are pulling out my phone not playing a game but I’m constantly reading something.

Jim Rembach:     What would be one book that you’d recommend for our listeners?

Art Sobczak:     One of the best all-time books it’s a classic it’s simply called “Influenced” by Robert Cialdini.

Jim Rembach:     You can find links to that and other bonus information from today’s show by going to fastleader.net/Art Sobczak and you’ll also find a free e-book from Art titled, 501 Sales Telephone Tips. Okay, Art, this is my last Hump Day Hoedown question: Imagine you are given the opportunity go back to the age of 25 and you’ve been given the opportunity to take the knowledge and skills that you have back with you but you can’t take everything you can only choose one so what skill or piece of knowledge would you take back with you and why? 

Art Sobczak:     Well, 25 I was already, two and half, three years into my business. And looking back on my career I would say one thing that has probably held me back from even achieving greater things is the ability to think a little bit bigger in every situation. I’ve certainly done it, I’ve accomplished a lot but if I started even earlier with, just thinking bigger asking bigger, going after bigger deals in all aspects of life, I know I would’ve achieved more but it’s never too late to start.

Jim Rembach:     Art part it was an honor to spend time with you today can you please share with the fast leader legion how they can connect with you?

Art Sobczak:     You can connect with me in several ways, my main website is businessbyphone.com, you can hook up with me at LinkedIn, I’m an open networker, you can also look me up on Facebook, I also have a blog which is smartcalling.com. You can also find on Twitter, all those places you can get free sales tips and information.

Jim Rembach:     Art, thank you for sharing your knowledge and wisdom the Fast Leader Legion honors you and thanks you for helping us get over the hump. Woot! Woot!

Thank you for joining me on the Fast Leader show today. For recaps, links from every show, special offers and access to download and subscribe, if you haven’t already, head on over the fastleader.net so we can help you move onward and upward faster. 

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