155: Peter Lisoskie: Sure, I’ll bet my job on it

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155: Peter Lisoskie: Sure, I’ll bet my job on it

Peter Lisoskie Show Notes Page

Peter Lisoskie bet his job on a new idea. After numerous failures, Peter finally obtained 7 patents for his effort. Since then, Peter has focused his innovation on emotionally connected user interfaces to create interactive conversational brand experiences to shape messaging experiences for companies and their customers.

Peter was raised in Olympia, Washington growing up in the outdoors fishing and building waterfront houses with his father. He is one of 5 children with 3 sisters and a younger brother. Peter completed a degree in Mechanical Engineering and played baseball during college where he started the seeds of innovation, teamwork, and leadership that he expresses today.

He developed his work ethic from his father and his teamwork and leadership skills from his coaches. Early in his college career after messing around at practice coach Brown pulled him into his office and asked him why he wasn’t putting in the effort in practice and said these words that Peter carries with him today, “How you do anything is how you do everything.”

After college, Peter worked in high-tech doing product design, manufacturing, and development for a host of companies in test and measurement, consumer electronics, payment transactions, bioscience, biomedical, and consumer goods. He utilized his leadership, communication and technical skills and was sought after running divisions for VeriFone, Hewlett Packard and Nike. This resulted in 13 patents, implementing robots before Ford, bringing in the first rapid prototyping machines in North America, and developing the world’s first VR glasses while running the division for Nike.

Leaving the corporate world in 2003, Peter embarked upon entrepreneurship and started and built a franchise company from $1,500 and two employees to $5.2M and 52 employees in 4 years. After he sold this company, Peter went back to his roots and founded inViral a business and technology incubator that tracks megatrends and develops products and technologies in those megatrend waves.

He currently founded Bot // Nation spawning a new technology he calls Active Attention Design (A2D) using conversation user interface standards, chatbots, Artificial Intelligence, neuroscience, animation, and cognitive biases to create interactive conversational brand experiences to shape messaging experiences for companies and their customers.

As Peter sees it, messaging is the new platform of the internet and conversation is the new economy. It is the next evolution in digital media marketing and customer service. This megatrend has helped Peter form an Agency and SAAS software development group working on innovations that connect the world through conversation.

On the personal side, Peter loves to run, lift weights, and reads a ton of books and articles to stay sharp and activate innovation. He currently lives in Carlsbad, California with his girlfriend and keeps in regular touch with his two boys Kaz and Kaikane doing what he can to help them fulfill their dreams.

Tweetable Quotes and Mentions

Listen to @chatbotnation to get over the hump on the @FastLeaderShow Click to Tweet

“Websites are going to be chat sites; everything is going to change.” -Peter Lisoskie Click to Tweet

“The blurring of all these technologies with the Virtual Assistant is coming into view.” -Peter Lisoskie Click to Tweet 

“It’s no longer about mission or vision for companies, it’s about movements.” -Peter Lisoskie Click to Tweet 

“For the client, consumer or patient, it’s about the experience.” -Peter Lisoskie Click to Tweet 

“Millennials value the experience over the product or service.” -Peter Lisoskie Click to Tweet 

“We are creating conversational experience standards.” -Peter Lisoskie Click to Tweet 

“One of the most common things a person types into a chatbot is, I love you.” -Peter Lisoskie Click to Tweet 

“We want to bend the universe in our direction.” -Peter Lisoskie Click to Tweet 

“Social Media is noise” -Peter Lisoskie Click to Tweet 

“It’s about owning the conversation with customers, moving past the noise.” -Peter Lisoskie Click to Tweet 

“You’ve got to jump off the cliff and take chances.” -Peter Lisoskie Click to Tweet 

“Leadership is about looking to see what no one else can see and pulling them along to that new vision.” -Peter Lisoskie Click to Tweet 

“This is the bumpy road to get to that thing that others don’t see.” -Peter Lisoskie Click to Tweet 

“If you are doing something that matters, you have to have clarity that drives focus.” -Peter Lisoskie Click to Tweet 

“If I had better clarity, I’d be better.” -Peter Lisoskie Click to Tweet 

“See something that others don’t see and go do that.” -Peter Lisoskie Click to Tweet 

Hump to Get Over

Peter Lisoskie bet his job on a new idea. After numerous failures, Peter finally obtained 7 patents for his effort. Since then, Peter has focused his innovation on emotionally connected user interfaces to create interactive conversational brand experiences to shape messaging experiences for companies and their customers.

Advice for others

Help others to see what you can see and create a teamwork environment to pull them along to create innovation.

Holding him back from being an even better leader

Not enough clarity.

Best Leadership Advice

See something that others don’t see and go do that.

Secret to Success

Getting the right people around me that are smarter than me.

Best tools that helps in Business or Life

Exercise and reading a bunch of books.

Recommended Reading

Play Bigger: How Pirates, Dreamers, and Innovators Create and Dominate Markets

Contacting Peter Lisoskie

website: https://chatbotnation.co/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/chatbotnation

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/petelisoskie/

Resources and Show Mentions

Developing a Better Place to Work

Increase Employee Engagement and Workplace Culture

Empathy Mapping

54 Emotional Intelligence (EQ) Competencies List: Emotional Intelligence has proven to be the right kind of intelligence to have if you want to move onward and upward faster. Get your free list today.

 

Show Transcript: 

Click to access edited transcript

155: Peter Lisoskie: Sure, I’ll bet my job on it

 Intro:   Welcome to the Fast Leader podcast where we explore convenient yet effective shortcuts that will help you get ahead and move forward faster by becoming a better leader. And now here’s your host customer and employee engagement expert and certified emotional intelligence practitioner, Jim Rembach.

The number one thing that contributes to customer loyalty is emotions. So move onward and upward faster by gaining significantly deeper insight and understanding of your customer journey and personas with emotional intelligence. With your empathy mapping workshop you’ll learn how to evoke and influence the right customer emotions that generate improve customer loyalty and reduce your cost to operate. Get over your emotional hump now by going to empathymapping.com to learn more. 

Jim Rembach:   Okay Fast Leader legion, today I’m excited because we have somebody on the show today that’s going to help us with the unhuman side of the customer experience. Peter Lisoskie was raised in Olympia, Washington growing up in the outdoors fishing and building water houses with his father. He is one of five children with three sisters and a younger brother. Peter completed a degree in mechanical engineering and played baseball during college where he started the seeds of innovation teamwork and leadership that he expresses today. He developed his work ethic from his father and his teamwork and leadership skills from his coaches. Early in his college career after messing around at practice coach Brown pulled him into his office and he asked him why wasn’t he putting in the effort and practice and he said these words to Peter which sticks with him today, how you do anything is how you do everything. After college Peter worked in high-tech doing product design, manufacturing and development for a host of companies in test and measurement, consumer electronics payment transactions, bioscience, biomedical and consumer goods. He utilized his leadership communication and technical skills and was sought after running divisions for VeriFone, Hewlett-Packard and Nike. This resulted in 13 patents implementing robots before Ford, bringing in the first rapid prototyping machines in North America and developing the world’s first VR glasses while he was running a division for Nike. 

Leaving the corporate world in 2003 Peter embarked upon entrepreneurship and started and built a franchised company from $1.500 and two employees to 5.2 million and 52 employees in four years. After he sold this company Peter went back to his roots and founded inViral a business and technology incubator that tracks megatrends and develops products and technologies in those megatrend waves. He currently founded Bot // Nation spawning a new technology he calls Active Attention Design (A2D) using conversation user interface standards, chat BOTS, AI, neuroscience animation and cognitive biases to create interactive conversational brand experiences to shape messaging experiences for companies and their customers. 

On the personal side Peter loves to run, lift weights, and read a ton of books and articles to stay sharp and activate innovation. He currently lives in Carlsbad, California with his girlfriend and keeps in regular touch with his two boys Kaz and Kaikane, doing what he can to help them fulfill their dreams. Peter Lisoskie, are you ready to help us get over the hump?

Peter Lisoskie:   I am ready Jim let’s go do it. That was a mouthful. 

Jim Rembach:   You have been busy man, I tell you. And you’re definitely in a space right now that’s very busy. I’ve given our listeners a little bit about you but can you tell us what your current passion is so that we can get to know you even better. 

Peter Lisoskie:   At a high low my current passion is really about innovation. I live it it’s in my blood. I just have always loved to create technology and innovation but it has to be about human connection. This goes back in the day I started my career, Jim, before there was personal computers. I’ll never forget when I worked at Fluke test and measurement we got the first Mac pluses, remember the base boxes with a screen, and I have pulled that thing out of the box and plugged it in and turned it on and the screen lit up and it was like, wow, there’s like files and folders we don’t have to use 60 commands a UNIX code anymore. But it was an emotional connection, I know we’ve talked about that off air, but you have this emotional connection with an inanimate object a product and that really rang true to me, this is how good innovation is done.

Jim Rembach:   I think you bring up an excellent point when it comes to the emotional connection and the experience. We often think that because of some bad experiences that we’ve had with automations that having automation to be able to serve customers and be served is a very, very bad thing. However, when you start looking at the statistics associated with customer experience and the measurement and customer retention and loyalty and all that stuff, really, the human experience and the automation experience often are quite even and sometimes the automation experience is rated even higher than the human experience.

Peter Lisoskie:   Jim, just to add to that, let’s just talk about a very specific example on that. Have you ever been to a website down in the chat and clicked on it and no one was there? And they said, we’re not here so leave us an email we’ll get back to you in 24 hours. Now, how is that a good human experience? It’s not. Enter the automation of the chat bot it is there 24/7 and we build them with NOU, artificial intelligent engine so they get smarter and smarter answering questions to create a concierge virtual assistant experience. They never get sick, they never have a flat tire, they never yell at your customers and they provide that kind of help that’s instant, it’s user-driven, and it’s relevant to what the user is looking for. That’s how automation creates a better humanized connected experience. 

Jim Rembach:   I think when I started—I’ve been studying this whole chat bot world for quite a while now and one of the things that I find quite interesting to me and I almost have to stop myself because from a lot of particular situations I see the use case is being quite simple and quite visible but so many people just don’t know where and how to get started they can’t figure out that first use case to get going. How do you direct people to get started?

Peter Lisoskie:   Well, the three big ones—we work in the areas of what we call concierge BOTS or virtual assistants. There’s also brand culture BOTS and there’s the impact BOTS but going down one level really it’s about you could start with lead qualification you can start with customer service or you can start with a virtual assistant, those are the three biggie’s. I’d say companies  that are just looking at this—think lead qualification, for somebody like yourself, you’re doing a podcast show, you could do the Facebook ads, you can do blog posts, you can do social media post and you could have a link that can when they click on it, it instantly pops up. Let’s say for example a Facebook messenger BOT, now based on whatever that article was or the podcast show that you have the BOT starts interacting and talking with you now, by the way we use talking animated characters. Here’s the thing, if you want human connectedness, I don’t care we’re talking to some very large scale educational companies right now,  it’s got to be entertaining and fun or people are not going to hang out. We’re creating these almost like movie-like entertainment experiences, we could create a talking animated character of you Jim. Think about like, if you wrote a book and you put it up on Amazon and there are these things called messenger codes, people can scan the code on the book cover on Amazon with their iPhone or Android and guess who pops up? You as the animated character, say, hi I’m Jim I’m the author of this book and I want to tell you a little bit about this or even a real-life video of you. Think about that, that interactive experience that we’ve never had before. By the way, we’re working with some top authors where those codes are going to be put in chapters and now people can scan them they can get resources and tools, they can tell them more about the subject matter in the chapter and you have to almost think about—now we’re creating this whole interactive experience where you don’t really need chapters or table of contents because the chat BOTS handling it all is a virtual assistant for you. 

Jim Rembach:   I think that’s fascinating. Even when you were going through and explaining and talking about that I started thinking about use cases that I never even had in my mind before so now it’s even opened up my mind, so thanks for doing that. As you were talking I started thinking about a couple things. First of all, when I start thinking about use cases and you even talked about those different types of BOTS I’m starting to think about development time, testing rollout, the fact is that there’s a lot of opportunities and I could potentially, when I start thinking about deployment and build times and all this stuff, it could potentially take me years to build out the use cases that I have available to me. So, how can an organization be more agile and build you know BOTS and be successful with it faster?

Peter Lisoskie:   Well, that’s a really good question, I’ll try not to get too technical. At BOT nation we’re more than just an agency we do full-stock software application or SAS, Software Service Development. In our (9:13) I had become a software engineer because that’s where everything is these days, right? The thing about it is that the chat BOT is the client side, the front end, and there is middleware API and there’s back-end development. Now, now what’s interesting there are standard sets of tools  like for example—if you want get a little technical what used to be api.ai for Google is now dialogue flow. 

We  are creating standardized code libraries, that by the way have hooks for voice, this year we’re going to be coming out where the BOT not only will be your virtual assistant on your website but you can talk through Amazon Echo or  Google Home and your BOT will start coming up. We’ll develop you know like Amazon’s Skills and Google Actions where you now start having your virtual assistant gym buddy that runs around it gets information for you on the web. And this is not like Hal of 2001, this is happening this year and we are developing some of this in our company. You’re going to see some big changes, I’m here to tell you because I’ve got a lot of buddies working in the high tech industry that work at Apple work at Microsoft work at different places—Oasis we’re going to be run by  BOTS. Your Mac and your PC you’re going to have your little virtual assistant and it’s going to do your computing functions and it’s going to take you wherever you want to go. Websites are going to be chat sites all social media is going to change everything is really going to change. I even think the Google search is going to change because if you have a chat BOT why do you need to type into Google the chat BOT will take care of that. Now, there’ll still have Google out there and you’ll still have those search engines but your little VA buddy over time and also with our software team we have data scientists that are developing software behavior models. So think about it, Facebook is developing behavioral models on everybody. Imagine if your little VA buddy knew about your—Jim, here’s your shopping preferences, here’s your social media preferences, here’s what you like to read  and it can make suggestions and pull all that together that is coming by 2020 and we are actively working on that right. Now, 2018 there’ll be some big changes then 2019 and 2020 the blurring of all these technologies with the virtual assistant or concierge is coming into view.

Jim Rembach:   Gosh! As you’re talking I started thinking about, yeah, yeah, right—but then I had to reflect the fact upon this whole driverless car thing. I thought initially when they started talking about this it’s like—we’re not going to see that in my lifetime, by the way, I’ll turn 50 in a couple weeks.

Peter Lisoskie:   Happy birthday. 

Jim Rembach:   Thank you. I’m like—they’re not going to see that in my lifetime—heck, we might it by the time I’m 55 the world’s it’s going to be more mess as far as driverless cars are concerned. I think what you were talking about just a second ago in regards to the virtual customer assistant the same thing is going to happen with our whole car experience. I was at a venture capital firm out in Silicon Valley a couple weeks ago and I was privy in this conversation where this guy was talking about cars in the future are going to be more like you select the experience that you want. People aren’t going to own cars it’s going to be more like a car type share, in other words, I want to watch a movie on this four-hour drive and I want it to be action-adventure. And then the car will come to you pick you up and you’re going to be watching in an action-adventure movie on your trip. It’s not going to be what we currently can see and I’m like, no, no, no, no but it’s going to be here. I just need to stop doubting the technology as you’re saying.

Peter Lisoskie:   That brings up a really good point and that’s something I do want to talk about for a little bit here and that is, everything is moving, and I talked about off before we got on the show, it’s no longer about vision or mission for companies it’s about movements, for the client or consumer or patient it is about the experience. In fact, if you look at millennial studies, millennial value experience over the actual product or service and there are 76 billion of them, bigger than the baby boomer population.  So, what we’re doing in this A2D we talked about is we are creating what are called CX or conversational experience standards. They don’t exist it’s kind of like going back to GUI. Somebody had to develop that and they have graphical user interface standards like files and folders, I could talk about computers and now I just have these green screens with code, we are at that place right now pioneering where we are creating these conversational user interface standards. And how I’m doing that? I have an agency and we’re using it as a lab, we have a lot of clients and we’re seeing a lot of   feedback back and forth how are these people interacting with these chat BOTS. I’ll tell you right now. Do you know one of the most common thing a person types into a chat BOT? 

Jim Rembach:   Are you a BOT?

Peter Lisoskie:   That and I love you. It’s the weirdest thing I’ve ever seen but we get that a ton, so guess what, I put that in the AI—Okay, we’ll you tell the BOT to respond back. But you know, it’s just these kinds of things, it’s very fascinating to me whether we work with craft breweries, with manufacturing supply chain, all different kinds of industries, how are these people interacting and posing questions and talking to the BOT? But I will tell you this is why we’re doing animated characters not just out of entertainment. That goes back to the big aha with (14:46 inaudible) was the fact that I originally did a chatbot right after Facebook, Zuckerberg came out and in 2016, and said, we’re opening up the API for chatbots. I have a health and wellness center and I created this little emojicon called Chase, the chatbot. I gave him a name gave him a personality but what was interesting—we did a contest there were some really good business numbers out of it. What blew me away is people started writing back to me and they started saying, hey, that Chase guy was kind of funny he cracked me up. They didn’t say that BOT. Then fast forward we are on John Lee Dumas’s show and we had built this, we offered a free chatbot for website, we went off and we had this (15:28 inaudible) and I had this brainstorm, we said, you know we’re going to use Wilson the volleyball from Castaway, Tom Hanks had this, animated, personal conversation with inanimate object. So we created this whole chat bot which Wilson was this talking volleyball he was the emcee and then I had been watching with my girlfriend the show Survivor on TV, and I said, that’s perfect we’re going to create this whole game show environment. We had like a beach challenge, hiking and fishing challenge all that kind of stuff and here’s what blew me away these were like three to five minute experiences. If you look at neuroscience, and there’s been a lot of people we’ve done some testing too with our neuroscientist and our incubator, the average attention span of a human being is now about eight seconds and goldfish is nine, so if you guys do the math—but anyway, nearly ninety four percent of the people, Jim, they went through the entire three to five-minute experience they were engaged they were entertained. But what happened was, seventy percent of the people fill out the information for the contest but what blew me away, which was the big AHA which confirmed what I thought it was going on with Chase, we had over a 110 people they wrote us and they said, that was the guy cracked me up he was hilarious I’d never laugh my head off you guys got like a Wilson too—none of them said that BOT. 

Now, going back to my neuroscience research I read a very interesting study back in 2010 from Princeton University, Jim. In that in that study they had two people that had these electroencephalogram, they’d measured the electrical synaptic pulses, the brainwave patterns, they had one person telling a story one person receiving a story.  What they found out Jim was that those people had almost identical brainwave patterns. Now, why do I say that? Because in their brain, like when you watch a tearjerker movie and you tear up or you watch a funny movie you laugh, logically you know it’s a character in the movie but in your system one thinking you identify with the character as if you are the character. This is powerful and this is why an A2D really works because these animated characters they identify with them as if they’re real even though we don’t. We do not fool them we tell them you’re in a bot they know logically they’re talking to a bot but they’re relating to the character as if it’s real. 

Jim Rembach:   Well I think what you just explained right there too is just the whole value associated with VR and one my VR is going to be so dominant. My kids—I got my two boys are gamers just like every single boy in the world—12 and 9—and so they’ve got the Xbox 360 and they want think for Christmas, the PS4, and I’m like, that ain’t can’t happen. First of all we’re not switching gaming consoles and you have to buy all these new games but besides that you just need to wait another year or two because everything’s going to be VR. 

Peter Lisoskie:   Yeah. 

Jim Rembach:   I said you’re going to be wanting the VR glasses right after you’ve got the PS 4, so no we’re not going to do that. It’s the se thing, I am now engaged my brain-waves and the patterns it feels like I’m riding the roller coaster even though I’m sitting in my den right? It’s just amazing how our brains are going to react to what’s coming. 

Peter Lisoskie:   There’s a very interesting studies we’ve done and others are doing about the different neurotransmitter dumps like Dopine and oxytocin and things like that this is why part of A2D we’re using neuroscience and cognitive biases itt’s not to try to manipulate the conversation it’s to try to deeper richer conversation. Obviously, if all the BOT does was like ask you questions and you push yes or no like the dumb guided BOTS that’s not a conversation. To have someone engaged because it’s instant it’s relevant to them it’s user driven by them it’s entertaining and it is asking questions but they are providing input and there’s a dialogue going on between BOT and person, that’s a totally different thing and that’s what we’re doing.

Jim Rembach:   So, what we’re talking about a lot is emotion and one of the things that we look at on this show are quotes to help us get energized and hopefully focus/ is there a quote or two that you can share that you like?

Peter Lisoskie:   I have this on my website if you guys go up, I’m a big fan, rest in peace Steve Jobs, that guy was one of my heroes for really seeing what I call being in a different sandbox knuckle sandbox wherein having a different lens that he had on. I’ll never forget the day when he stood up on stage and he pulled out the iPhone from that manila envelope and he says, we have a new category, king in iPhones, right? That’s what this book is about too we’re working with Christopher Lochhead, behind me there, Play Bigger, that book is a field guide for innovation. If you guys haven’t read it I suggest you read it. He had said back in 1985 in a playboy article about Apple is a really different place to work and we really look for people that want to overextend themselves a little bit to put a little dent in the universe. You remember that quote, I love that one and I’ve always carried it with me. We’ve changed it a little bit and I always talk to our software developers and our team about we want to bend the universe in our direction because it’s about really creating something that people have not seen before. 

The sandbox right now Jim is email marketing, websites, social media if you guys aren’t , you’re listening to this then you can go to our website look this up. Hub Spot reported over 55% of people spend less than 15 seconds on websites. Email marketing industry average is 20% open rates one to two percent click-through rates. Social media is noise. All these things that used to be a blessing are now a curse for us guys, and everybody is in that sandbox creating more and more and more noise. Well, we stepped over into a brand new sandbox and a brand new lens called conversational experiences with chat BOTS as the engine to create this   interactive conversational brand experience. This is something like nobody has seen before and it’s creating a very good response rates because it is out of that sandbox that is such a curse for people nowadays. 

Jim Rembach:   I think you bring up a great point. What you just referred to right there is the whole—we all talk about disruption, it is just that it’s jumping into a different sandbox and bending people into your direction. I think that’s a great focus it isn’t necessarily a true north it’s a right hook, right? 

Peter Lisoskie:   Jim, it’s no different than like you’ve said a couple times here on this show, and I know when I showed you stuff off air, the thing is you start seeing this you go, wow okay I could do this I could do this I could do this. Every demo, because we have demos, we have people scan messenger codes how BOTS come up and our discovery sessions it just blows their mind because it’s like—holy Moses I’ve never seen anything like this before—and that’s the kind of experience. Think about that, you guys that are listening out there you can have that with your prospective customers or clients and it’s about owning the conversation with them moving past the noise to owning that conversation, it is super powerful. 

Jim Rembach:   Very much so. We talked about—when I read your bio—the different pivots that you’ve taken within your career and what you’re doing right now but within that we didn’t get into some of those humps that you’ve had to get over. Is there a story that where you can share that where you’ve got over the hump?

Peter Lisoskie:   Yeah. I’m sure everybody has a ton of these. I’ll tell you way back in the day when I first started my engineering career, I started at Fluke test and measurement, back at that time it was a privately owned company it had gone public, I used to be able to go up to see George Wynn who is the president. As a young engineer I was always up in his office asking him for something that we were going to do that was crazy innovative. One day I went in there, I traveled all over the world, but I used to go to Asia a lot Jim because I would go to their electronic shows because I wanted to see what are they doing? It’s way outside the box from test and measurement because there’s where you get these ideas. I was walking around the big huge electronics show in Tokyo and back in the corner of this big huge Sony booth, this is of course back in the ‘80’s, there was this little turntable, moldy, old record turntables, and on there was a stylus and they had this little rubberized thing that was integrated into the stylus head and I went, wow that’s kind of interesting, I’ve never seen anything like that. What t it did is it gave me this aha it’s like, tests and measurements is a handheld multi meters for measuring volts and ohms, so I said, what if we could take that idea and over mold it over plastic where it becomes an integrated over mold. We came back and I shared this with George Wynn and I said, we got to do these kind of tool that dealt with research. And he would always say, it was back in the day when they smoked cigarettes and they had the liquor cabinet, he was sitting there and he said, alright Peter this looks like a good idea but are you willing to bet your job on this one? And I go, yeah, George I’ll bet my job on this one. 

So we went on we developed this over mold thing and I’ll tell you what the funniest thing, one of the biggest humps, we could not get this thing to work we kept shooting part after part after part. And Jim we had probably like it in our plastics, because we had our plastics ejection multicenter, I’d say there was a time we had a pile of probably 50 to 20 feet wide and about ten feet high it’s not environmentally that good. One of those days when we had a huge pile and I was at my wit’s end with my engineer we could not figure out how this to work, guess who walks through the plastic molding center, George Wynn. Then he goes, what the hell is going on here? Then I go, we’re trying to figure this out with innovation and I have to do a lot of fast talking. We eventually got that and seven patents later you see now all the over mold in the world that came from our group it was one of the most innovative things back then because it was about ergonomics not gooey. This was a big huge change and how handheld devices with old remote protection hand, you know bumpers and something that’s good to grip. But that was one of the many, many stories I could tell you. 

I can tell you a story about how we did the first adept robot before Ford. I was working with a guy, the robot whipped around hit him in the head and I thought it killed him. We’ve done all kinds of crazy stuff that you look at us at the time that’s like a super hump in eco bag go, well that was kind of funny, I’m glad the guy didn’t die. That’s how innovation happen you’ve got to jump off the cliff and take chances.

Jim Rembach:   I think you said it well and thanks for sharing those stories. You kind of said it well to is like, are you willing to bet your job on this? I think that’s where a lot of people are absolutely not—there’s no way, I won’t do that they won’t stick their neck out but unfortunately when you start talking about some of the innovations that really make a significant difference. Even in your own career you do have to do some of that neck sticking out and putting it on the line. 

Peter Lisoskie:   It goes back to, I know it’s a big part of your show, and that’s how I look at leadership. Leadership is about looking to see what no one else could see and pulling them along to that new vision or that new movement we talked about. To me that’s true leadership, it’s the ability to say I see something that no one else does, that’s why I love Steve Jobs. He saw things, you look at somebody, as quote says—we create things that people don’t even know that they need yet. Look at the iPod, the iPad, the iPhone, these are things that—well, yeah okay, there was other pieces of it, it was the implementation of it that made Apple what they are today. 

Jim Rembach:      And also being psychotically relentless, right? 

Peter Lisoskie:   Yeah, we are. I can’t tell you thank you fierce we’ve had already with chat BOTS or people got mad at us we always got bad from Facebook one time but this is the bumpy road to get to that thing that others don’t see.

Jim Rembach:   Absolutely. Okay, you’ve got a lot of things going, you’re going on different Podcast, thanks for coming on a Fast Leader show, you’re trying to build this business, really getting into a more emotionally connected conversational interface—there’s a lot you have, you just like to exercise, you’ve got a lot of things happening—but if you had one goal, one, what would it be? 

Peter Lisoskie:   Probably to be able to meditate 30 minutes every day. I don’t know it’s funny, I don’t know if you guys can relate, you guys that are listening Jim, I know you can relate because I know your similar to be but here’s the thing, I get out of bed and I’m thinking—I can do this, I can do this, I can do this. Obviously one of the biggest things I’ve always, in my life like mentioned that coach Brown when he talked to me back when I was a freshman in college and that whole thing how you do anything is how you do everything, that really sticks with me. The other thing is about clarity. I fight with this every day because man oh man is it easy to be a  ADD, we’ve (29:03 inaudible) I could waste going out and social media and Facebook and read my email and all this stuff but if you are a true innovator or if you’re doing something in your business that matters you have to have that clarity that drives the focus that says, I am going on this path I am getting this done today and every day of the week to get to that thing that these people cannot see. Unfortunately, when I go run, I have some of my best business ideas, because that’s almost like my meditative time and I get to exercise I get to relax, but I cannot tell you some of the best business ideas came when I was out there on the road somewhere or out there in the woods running around. 

Jim Rembach:   I think that’s a great point. And the Fast Leader legion wishes you the very best. Now before we move on let’s get a quick word from our sponsor.

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 Jim Rembach:     Alright, here we go Fast Leader legion it’s time for the Hump Day Hoedown. Okay, Peter, the Hump Day Hoedown is a part of our show where you give us good insights fast. I’m going to ask you several questions and your job is to give us a robust yet rapid responses that are going to help us move onward and upward faster. Peter Lisoskie, are you ready to hoedown?

Peter Lisoskie:   Yes, I am, let’s go do it. 

Jim Rembach:   What do you think is holding you back from being an even better leader today?

  Peter Lisoskie:   Probably not enough clarity. If I had better clarity I’d be better.

Jim Rembach:   What is the best leadership advice you have ever received? 

Peter Lisoskie:   Really see something the others don’t see and go do that what. 

Jim Rembach:   What is one of your secrets that you believe contributes to your success? 

Peter Lisoskie:   Probably getting the right people around me that are smarter than me. 

Jim Rembach:   What do you feel is one of your best tools that helps you lead in business or life? 

Peter Lisoskie:   Exercise and reading a whole bunch of books. 

Jim Rembach:   On that vein, what would be one book that you’d recommend to our listeners, it could be from any genre? 

Peter Lisoskie:   One that I’m currently in love with is the book, Play Bigger by Christopher Lochheed that thing is a field guide for innovation.

Jim Rembach:   Okay, Fast Leader legion, you can find links to that and other bonus information from today’s show by going to fastleader.net/Peter Lisoskie. Okay, Peter, this is my last Hump Day Hoedown question. Imagine you were given the opportunity to go back to the age of 25. And you’ve been given the opportunity to take the knowledge and skills that you have now back with you but you can’t take everything back you can only choose one. What skill or piece of knowledge would you take back with you and why?

Peter Lisoskie:   The skill I’d take back at that young age because I was still learning is the ability to help others see maybe what I see and create a teamwork environment to pull them along to create innovation. Boy, oh boy, can you do a whole bunch of things with some really cool smart people, we’re doing that right now, and I learned that over time. if I had known that back at 25 I was more of a maverick doing my own thing getting in trouble—but to surround yourself with some really good people. Stephen Covey always talked about it, the whole is greater than the sum of its parts and I’m a big fan of seven Habits and all that kind of stuff. So you have that teamwork creationist is super, super important. 

Jim Rembach:   Peter it was an honor spent time with you today can you please share with a Fast Leader how they can connect with you?

Peter Lisoskie:   You can connect with me on LinkedIn, just look up Peter Lisoskie or you can go over if you want to check out some demos and things like that really kind of figure out how the mind-blowing experience that we talked about just go to https://chatbotnation.com we’ve got a lot of good stuff up there.

Jim Rembach:   Peter Lisoskie, thank you for sharing your knowledge and wisdom the Fast Leader legion honors you and thanks you for helping us get over the hump. Woot! Woot!

Thank you for joining me on the Fast Leader show today. For recaps, links from every show, special offers and access to download and subscribe, if you haven’t already, head on over the fastleader.net so we can help you move onward and upward faster.

END OF AUDIO

 

 

 

2019-12-08T06:14:13-05:00January 10th, 2018|Podcasts|0 Comments

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