page title icon 179: Jeff Piersall: It cost me a tremendous journey

Jeff Piersall Show Notes Page

Jeff Piersall was in a 14-year business relationship with who he thought was a good friend. But it ended in a betrayal. Despite another partner betrayal later in his career, Jeff holds on the belief that ethical capitalism is what the majority of the world believes in, desires and practices.

Jeff Piersall was born in Orlando, FL and raised for elementary schooling in Winchester, KY and graduated from high school in Dade City, FL at Pasco High School.  During his junior year at Pasco High, a special teacher saw something in him, his talent for leadership.  Jeff was a four sport letterman at that time but basically the class clown so running for Student Government President, the most prestigious honor at the school was way out of the comfort zone.  But this teacher convinced him to run and he actually won and went on to have one of the greatest moments in the history of the school, starting activities that still to this day that are traditions at Pasco which all four of his younger brothers enjoyed graduating in the years to come and still today nieces and nephews experience them nearly 40 years later.

Jeff’s younger brothers and his mom were all MENSA qualified academic types, he was the only entrepreneur in the group.  Jeff got his entrepreneurial spirit from his grandmother on his Dad’s side and his coaching skills from his grandfather on his mother’s side.  The unique combination of both has been the successful edge that Jeff possess in leading people.

When he was 10, he and his buddies would play cops and robbers all over town in Winchester, KY riding their Huffy bicycles all day.  One particular road was home to a huge Dalmatian Dog that would chase you with the most ferrous bark.  The kids all avoided that street.  One day Jeff thought he would teach the barking dog a lesson and took the street on purpose and when that dog came after him instead of racing with fixed eyes on the target at the end of the street he turned and kicked at the dog’s jaw and instead of making contact the dog bite him in the left cheek of his butt – Barking Dogs only chase moving objects and if you pay attention to them they will bite you; a lesson for all people but especially entrepreneurs building a business.

After graduating from Troy University with a physical education degree in 1981, Jeff followed his Grandfather’s influence and became an accomplished high school and college basketball coach for the decade of the 80’s.  He left the basketball ranks in 1990 but never quit coaching.  He was an accomplished sales person and sales manager in the ‘90’s working both domestically and internationally.  He became CEO to a turn-around company that was a spin-off from Dupont and Conagra in 2000 moving him to Melbourne, FL his current resident today except for the time he stays in TENN at his second home.

Jeff is the author of Dogs Don’t Bark at Parked Cars where he shares how to build the foundation for leading an ethical capitalist organization.  The only real method to provide prosperity to our communities and country and globe.  Unethical is unsustainable.

Jeff is most proud of his 35 years of marriage to Judy and their three children are their greatest accomplishment, they are now 30, 26 and 24 and they are each successful contributors to society and make a difference with the people they touch every day.

Tweetable Quotes and Mentions

Listen to @jeffpiersall to get over the hump on the @FastLeaderShow Click to Tweet  

“When we talk about ethical capitalism, it really is a void in the marketplace today.” Click to Tweet 

“Between our universities and our media, we continue to get capitalist as really a cuss word.” Click to Tweet 

“When you know what capitalist truly stands for and you blend that with the component of ethical, you now have a power tool.” Click to Tweet 

“If you don’t have trust, everything else is going to be substantially more difficult.” Click to Tweet 

“The bigger your purpose, the bigger your why, the more critics you will actually end up having.” Click to Tweet 

“You got to be very careful and not get sidetracked and get your eyes off your goal.” Click to Tweet 

“Sometimes it’s what’s inside of us from our past that keeps us from ever achieving our true intention.” Click to Tweet 

“If you don’t have the courage to get up and to go get in the game, then it really isn’t going to matter at the end of the day.” Click to Tweet 

“You’re not acting with courage because you have great faith, you’re acting with courage because you have fear and the faith gets you to overcome that fear and still act.” Click to Tweet 

“Smart working is what’s going to get us get where we need to go.” Click to Tweet 

“Your joy must be your work and your work must be your joy.” Click to Tweet 

“We’re doomed to repeat the mistakes of our past if we don’t transfer wisdom.” Click to Tweet 

“We’re either going after time freedom, money freedom, the freedom of relationships or the freedom of purpose.” Click to Tweet 

“Start becoming the person you want everyone else to be.” Click to Tweet 

“Have the people around you that you want to be most like.” Click to Tweet 

Hump to Get Over

Jeff Piersall was in a 14-year business relationship with who he thought was a good friend. But it ended in a betrayal. Despite another partner betrayal later in his career, Jeff holds on the belief that ethical capitalism is what the majority of the world believes in, desires and practices.

Advice for others

Have the people around you that you want to be most like.

Holding him back from being an even better leader

Believing that we can make a positive difference on a global level.

Best Leadership Advice

Believe in you, first.

Secret to Success

I work hard and my faith is my guiding light.

Best tools that helps in Business or Life

Respect for other people.

Recommended Reading

Dogs Don’t Bark at Parked Cars: Your GPS in an Era of Hyper-Change

Wooden on Leadership: How to Create a Winning Organization

Contacting Jeff Piersall

website: http://www.jeffpiersall.com/

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jeffpiersall/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/jeffpiersall

Resources and Show Mentions

Call Center Coach

An Even Better Place to Work

 

Show Transcript: 

Click to access edited transcript

179: Jeff Piersall: It cost me a tremendous journey

 

Intro:   Welcome to the Fast Leader podcast where we explore convenient yet effective shortcuts that will help you get ahead and move forward faster by becoming a better leader. And now here’s your host customer and employee engagement expert and certified emotional intelligence practitioner, Jim Rembach.

Call center coach develops and unites the next generation of call center leaders. Through our e-learning and community individuals gain knowledge and skills from the six core competencies that is the blueprint that develops high-performing call center leaders. Successful supervisors do not just happen so go to callcentercoach.com. To learn more about enrollment and download your copy of the Supervisor Success Path e-book now.

 

Jim Rembach:    Okay, Fast Leader legion today I’m excited because of somebody on the show today who’s really going to give us an understanding of something that we can all connect with and how it could help us move onward and upward faster. 

 

Jeff Piersall was born in Orlando, Florida and raised for elementary schooling in Winchester, Kentucky and graduated from high school in Dade City, Florida at Pasco High School. During his junior year at Pasco High a special teacher saw something in him, his talent for leadership. Jeff was a four sport letterman at that time but basically the class clown so running for student government president the most prestigious honor at the school was way out of his comfort zone but this teacher convinced him to run and he actually won and went on to have one of the greatest moments in the history of the school starting activities that still to this day that are traditions at Pasco which all four of his younger brothers enjoyed graduating in the years to come and still today nieces and nephews experienced them nearly 40 years later. 

 

Jeff’s younger brothers and his mom were all meant to qualified academic types and he was the only entrepreneur in the group. Jeff got his entrepreneurial spirit from his grandmother on his dad’s side and his coaching skills from his grandfather on his mother’s side. The unique combination of both has been a successful edge that Jeff possesses in leading people. When he was 10 he and his buddies would play cops and robbers all over town in Winchester, Kentucky riding their huffy bicycles all day. One particular road was home to a huge Dalmatian dog that would chase you with the most ferocious bark the kids all avoided that street. One day Jeff thought he would teach the barking dog a lesson and took the street on purpose and when that dog came after him instead of racing with fixed eyes on the target at the end of the street he turned and kicked the dog’s jaw and instead of making contact the dog bit him in the left cheek of his butt. Barking dogs only chased moving objects and if you pay attention to them they will bite you a lesson for all people but especially entrepreneurs building a business.

 

After graduating from Troy University with a physical education degree in 1981, Jeff followed his grandfather’s influence and became an accomplished high school and college basketball coach for the decade of the 80s. He left the basketball ranks in 1990 but never quit coaching. He was an accomplished salesperson and sales manager in the 90s working both domestically and internationally. He became CEO of a turnaround company that was a spinoff from DuPont and ConAgra in 2000 moving him to Melbourne Florida his current resident today except for the time he stays in Tennessee and his second home. 

 

Jeff is the author of Dogs don’t Bark at Parked Cars, where he shares how to build the foundation for leading an ethical, capitalist organization the only real method to provide prosperity for our communities and country and globe, unethical is unsustainable. Jeff is most proud of his 35 years marriage to Judy and their three children are their greatest accomplishment. They are now 36, 26 and 24 and they are each successful contributors to society and make a difference with the people they touch every day. Jeff Piersall are you ready to help us get over the hump?

 

Jeff Piersall: Absolutely. 

 

Jim Rembach:    I’m glad you’re here. Now I’ve given my Legion a little bit about you but can you tell us what your current passion is so that we can get to know you even better?

 

Jeff Piersall: Yeah. I appreciate that very much and thank you for being here today. When we talk about ethical capitalism it really is a void in the marketplace today because between our universities and our media we continue to get capitalist as really a cuss word. Quite honestly when you know the true value and what it really stands for and you blend that with the component of ethical you now have a power tool. And through the thousands of CEOs we’ve interviewed over the last 13 years I got to tell you over 95% of them all fit the definition of ethical capitalism but you don’t hear about them I only think you ever hear about on the media’s the ones that have got it wrong.

 

Jim Rembach:    It’s really interesting you say that. A couple years ago I had a conversation with my next-door neighbor who was the Dean of business school for like 22 23 years which happened to be the third longest tenure of any Dean in any Business School in any major university. We were talking about ethics and he finally stopped me and he said, you know what he goes c-level people don’t care about ethics because it doesn’t affect the bottom line, but you’re saying different. 

 

Jeff Piersall: Yes, very much so. I tend to like them and we quoted it in the book, Harris Rosen of the Rosen Shingle Hospitality Center in Orlando and he’s such a great example because he was asked to give a graduation speech at Cornell and they said they want him to come speak on the topic of ethics. He turned the speech down and he said, that’s very simple there’s only just one statement just do what’s right. And if you work for Harris Rosen and you work for him for five years he will pay for your children to go to college that’s ethical capitalism and that is what Harris Rosen is all about. We see this all over the place and I understand what your Dean is trying to say but it’s really taking something in a silo and saying just because I got to make tough decisions as a CEO that doesn’t mean that they’re unethical decisions that just means that sometimes some people aren’t going to come out on the best side of that stick but you’ve got to make the ethical right decision. That typically is kind of like Spock would always say, the few do not outweigh the many. 

 

Jim Rembach:    As you’re sitting there talking I have to go to the to the book and actually how you’ve outlined it because ultimately you’re giving the elements or the pillars, there’s many ways you can describe that, or an organization that actually build an ethical operation and therefore receive the benefits associated with that, I’d like to run through those if that’s possible. 

 

Jeff Piersall: Yes, please. 

 

Jim Rembach:     The first one we have is the foundation of trust, relational priority, diversity of expression, influence not imposition, the significance of synergy, prevailing vision, process orientation, validating desire, recognizing life is both natural and spiritual and then building a legacy. Are these also in an order of maturation? Meaning that I need to first start with that foundation of trust in order to be able to go to the second or can these things be worked on at different times or even in parallel? 

 

Jeff Piersall: It’s a great question, honestly, nobody’s ever asked me that. However, there is a hierarchical structure in the sense that really the foundation of trust is where it all starts and if you don’t have trust everything else is going to be substantially more difficult. Obviously legacy and what you’re leaving is obviously the last and the ultimate goal of whatever your passion and desires are. Now in between there they can kind of rearrange in any certain fashion but trust and legacy are definitely the bookends.

 

Jim Rembach:    Also like the way that you actually position this talking about that story in your BIOS you talk about that these ten qualities have been part of the attributes that you found and the most effective trailblazers and dog out runners. 

 

Jeff Piersall: Yes. 

 

Jim Rembach:    So, you’re not going to get bitten in the butt if you get these ten things. 

 

Jeff Piersall: Yeah. When you think about it, it really is a constant journey and inside that journey there’s a lot of little sprints. Even the story of us being kids when we were running around cops and robbers if you went down that road where the big Dalmatian was and you stayed focus at the end of the road and all you did was just pedal and went as fast as you could that that dog never bit you it was just the time that I turned and paid attention to it that it got me. That is so true, the bigger your purpose the bigger your Y, the more critics you will actually end up having on that journey. You’ve got to be very careful not to get sidetracked and get your eyes off your goal. 

 

Jim Rembach:    I think that’s a great point. I think it’s too easy for us to look backwards when we should be looking forwards. 

 

Jeff Piersall: Yeah, Jim, one of the big pieces and you really kind of touched of touch on it we tend to look at barking dogs as external people or external concepts and ideas there’s a lot of same barking dogs inside of each of us and sometimes it’s what’s inside of us from our past that keeps us from ever achieving our true intention more so than the people external of us.

 

Jim Rembach:    I definitely can risk resonate with that. And I can also resonate the times where I was the barking dog at others. 

 

Jeff Piersall: Yes. We’ve all been victim, yeah. 

 

Jim Rembach:    When you start thinking about—you had mentioned something about the longitudinal aspects of you doing this research and building and understanding these ten qualities is that you probably found a lot along the way that maybe possess one that weren’t in the ten but actually experienced some success, so what was the number eleven? 

 

Jeff Piersall: Number eleven in our position is really the one virtue that is the sum of all virtues which is courage. You can have all ten of these foundational principles but if you’re sitting on the couch and you don’t have the courage to get up and to go get in the game then it really isn’t going to matter at the end of the day. Courage is really where all the separation is and I liken it to a lot for a lot of people, faith and fear has the exact same definition, it’s the things unseen in our future. The difference is which one of those two you choose who have a great difference on the end result. You’re not acting with courage because you have great faith you’re acting with courage because you have fear and the faith gets you to overcome that fear and still act. So, it’s a very substantial principle and it is the one that we find in all great entrepreneurs. 

 

Jim Rembach:    As you were talking and the way that you explained it I also started thinking and even looking at these ten qualities I started thinking also about effort. Is effort kind of just an implied thing it’s like table stakes, sorry I mean if you don’t have any effort kind of like you talked about getting off the couch, is the courage thing or it’s just the overall effort thing? I think those are two separate things but maybe that’s 12 or maybe that’s underlying every single one of these. 

 

Jeff Piersall: It’s an interesting concept because there’s the effort and I think a lot of entrepreneurs and their very beginning will spend an awful lot of time like myself you’re doing everything and anything in the business. And we sometimes think that that effort is out working others therefore we’ll get what we want to go when in fact we need to learn how to work more smart and that smart working is what’s going to get us where we need to go. In fact, today I work on actually taking 153 days a year and if you had two told me that two years ago I would have told you were just crazy there was an even three free days. And now I forced myself into those days and it actually makes me better on the days that I’m actually working and so if there is a tremendous sense of balance that comes out of all of that. 

 

Jim Rembach:    You mentioned something about an entrepreneur but as you were talking I also started thinking about somebody who’s working in within an organization it’s kind of a similar thing because what I see is—there’s been such a—you want to call it whatever you want but people are trying to be more agile or trying to be more streamline they’re trying to bootstrap more they’re trying to really limit the amount of resources and so what happens is an effect of that is you pile more on people. Even when you started talking about an effort and focus and all of that is even when you’re inside it’s not just an entrepreneurs problem you can’t do everything. 

 

Jeff Piersall: If you study Coach John Wooden which was a major influence on me in my lifetime he is a pyramid of success and I think this answers the question for you and your listeners. The pyramid has two cornerstones one is joy and one is work and in the description from Coach Wooden those two cornerstones are there because the pyramid falls apart without them and your joy must be your work and your work must be your joy and out of that now you can start to build the rest of your life which leads to competitive greatness. That is where I like to really refer to it not necessarily as entrepreneurs but the entrepreneurial spirit. It could be a single mom who’s raising three kids but that entrepreneurial spirit that outlook and the same with my employees. I want employees that have that entrepreneurial spirit to them because they’re going to get more done in less time and they’re going to be much more effective and they’re going to have a positive outlook they’re going to be team players I mean everything starts to come together. 

 

Jim Rembach:    Gosh, so when I started thinking about these ten elements the—been chased by the dog because I was been there too as I was reading this and as you’re talking about I’m like, I wasn’t on that road but I was on another road and one with Dalmatian but it was another dog that was chasing and this one was nipping at my ankles—there’s just so many things I can think about is that there’s a lot of humps that you’ve had to get over along the way and a lot of things that have inspired you. On the show we look at quotes in order to inspire us and I know you have several especially with all the research that you’ve done in regards to leaders but is there one or two that kind of stands out that you can share?

 

Jeff Piersall: Wow! There’s so many of them in my life. I kind of love Zig Ziglar’s quote, set yourself on fire and they’ll come from miles away to see you burn. And I think it really says a lot about the whole essence of the book. It really does say a lot about a person’s life for me because you can be the water cooler person who is always down and out complaining and finding what’s wrong and guess what? You could always get an audience it’s a very interesting thing. But when you get an audience because you’re enthusiastic, and I mean balanced enthusiasm, I see a lot of people that take this to the extreme and they’re so enthusiastic they’re so overboard that you’ve got to get away from them because they just don’t have a balance to themselves. You present yourself and you communicate with yourself in a very enthusiastic but yet balanced manner and therefore people want to listen and they want to hear what you have to say and I think that’s the importance. Zig always said it, if you’re on fire they’re going to come watch and that really is It. I can’t remember exactly how it goes but Teddy Roosevelt’s great quote about being on the field of play and those that are bloodied up at the end of the war are the ones that really can sit there and say, regardless of the score I gave it my best and I think there’s a lot to that. My partners and I on our team we kind of like look at it as—in the sports world you’re either a fan or a player. And players are on the field making things happen fans are up in the crowd they’ve paid to come watch there they’re overly enthusiastic they’re all jived up and ready to go but they ultimately have no outcome on the game as much as everybody may want it but  ultimately they don’t, It’s the players. I try to challenge everybody be a player get in the game and be a player. 

 

Jim Rembach:    Most definitely. So when you start looking at this particular transition in this journey that you’ve been on and going through getting over your own hump of  finally running to be that class president and getting it, I know there’s a lot of hump that you’ve had to get over in order to be able to get where you are today. Is there a story that you can share that we can find some inspiration in? 

 

Jeff Piersall: What a great question because there’s been hundreds of them I think and I think it’s what’s uniquely prepared me for what I am today. I would challenge anybody who’s listening today to always know that everybody’s journey is extraordinarily unique and all of them are filled with potholes. There’s a lot of times where you get to this point in your life and people will look at you at 58 and they’ll go, wow! Look at everything that you’ve accomplished everything is just so neatly put together and no it’s not I’m the same guy that struggled to even believe that he could be the student council president and then I’m the same person that went through a 14-year history with what I thought was a very good friend who completely stabbed me in the back and cost me a tremendous journey that I thought was what my destination was, well, the truth of it was that it wasn’t. And then I’ve even had in this most current business a partner that we had to deal with in the same manners with financial embezzlement and other different types of lies. All of us have gone through these battles and these journeys and the one thing that I learned from my dad from years and years and years ago and he just always said it to me, just never quit. I remember Jim Valvano in his going-away speech and really nobody knew it was but today it’s just a landmark and in the parts of North Carolina where you come out of you hear it all the time and it’s just never, never, never, quit and that is our journey and that’s really for anybody on your call that’s got to be your motto, just never, never quit. 

 

Talking about never quitting and then talking about taking that extra time and getting more done talking about right now over the weekend where you’re going to be up in Tennessee and turkey season started opens tomorrow you’re going to have some fun with your brother-in-law  but you have a lot of things going on—writing a book they say is the easy part promoting it is totally different story, that’s one reason why you’re on the show and then we’re glad you’re here, but you have several things and by the way 57, that ain’t old you got a lot of things that you want to accomplish. But if you have one goal, what would it be?

 

Jeff Piersall: Right now the one goal that we’ve got is for the company itself to become a self-managed company. And what I mean by that is that the company itself can run without me being there. The company has been so reliant upon me and—yes, I’ve got a very large charismatic personality and therefore it even makes it a little worse and I am the entrepreneur that’s got a new idea every ten minutes and that and that adds a lot of stress to the situation. About four years ago we started the process to become very process-oriented. As the company becomes more self-managed then I can go do the things that I’m more uniquely adapt to go do which is a lot of what we’re doing today but it’s even more so back to the teaching roots that I had when I was coaching and teaching these fundamentals and teaching these principles. 

 

Because I’m really convinced that we’re on a move we’ve got a huge uprising that’s coming we’ve got a major trend that a lot of people aren’t paying attention to with the baby boomers exiting you’ve got a workforce today that’s over average age 50 by 2025 it’s going to be average workforce of just over 30, that’s a 20-year swing in your workforce in less than 8 to 10 years and that creates a wisdom gap and we’re doomed to repeat the mistakes of our past if we don’t transfer that wisdom. Ultimately there’s one thing I think that all of us are wired for Jim and that’s freedom. And that freedom comes down into really four different pillars we’re either going after time freedom we’re going after money freedom we’re going after the freedom of relationships or the freedom of purpose. If you think of those four pillars those pillars is what makes up ethical capitalism because that is your pursuit as after that freedom. When you think about the guy that’s in the inner city streets it’s pursuing freedom but he’s doing it through selling drugs that unethical becomes unsustainable eventually and you see it across the world in all areas. I think we’ve got a huge opportunity to teach ethical capitalism the way it ought to be done and the millennials are open to it because there are very balanced generation that will ask questions when given the opportunity. 

 

Jim Rembach:    That’s a really good point. Unfortunately, talking about that particular generation when they get glamorized by they all think that they could become social media experts or people that get followed by, hey they’ve got a million followers or making all these money or hey they could be an athlete or hey I think a lot of times the idols and the people that we have to look up to oftentimes are problematic. I think Cohen goes back to what we’ve been saying a long time ago as far as having the courage and stick it out. I think more of the older generation needs to put themselves in a position to be the ones that we want to emulate and instead of people who are getting that entertainment glamour spotlight. 

 

Jeff Piersall: Well it’s kind of like the last chapter of the book of the ten principles, start becoming the person that you want everybody else to be. And that really kind of says a lot by itself because we’re quick to pass judgment we’re quick to say, oh they’re not doing this they’re not doing that. Well, why don’t you start becoming that person resonate it and it’ll attract and be on its own? So I hear you loud and clear and I think that there’s a huge opportunity in our generational shift to learn courage to learn persistence and I think those are some of the things I’m worried about as I’m watching. We’ve got a brilliant, brilliant group of kids that are really, really talented but they can’t buy into the lottery mentality because it doesn’t work that way everything is a long journey. 

 

Jim Rembach:    I think there are several things that lead me to being able to create the legacy and you do it every single day, that’s what you do day in and day out. We also have a situation where a lot of them don’t know how to be resilient, you have to learn resiliency. So, there’s a lot of these particular factors that I been talking about for a long time that impact the effect that our workforce is going to have on our businesses. When we start about creativity and innovation and all of those things you have to fail and have to have gone through that failure in order to learn how to overcome. 

 

Jeff Piersall: Yes you do. 

 

Jim Rembach:    You also have to be thinking about that legacy that you’re going to be leaving and it starts with that older generation. I specifically remember sitting down in a particular meeting where I was on the Finance Committee for our church and one of the folks on the Finance Committee we’re talking about his giving and the way that he gives and he said, well that’s personal I don’t talk about that. I said, well, how do you expect the other generation to learn what giving means? And he just kind of looked at me strange, you keep it to yourself and that’s where it dies. 

 

Jeff Piersall: That’s exactly where it dies. You made a great point particularly on failure and it’s the reason why I think athletics is such a great teacher because there’s nobody in athletics that hasn’t failed everybody fails. I grew up in the coaching era with Michael Jordan coming into college and then Pro and you look at his career and you just think but nobody remembers that he got cut from his varsity basketball team first and it was getting cut that led to the success. Nobody realizes that you know, okay, yeah he hit the last shot to win Dean Smith’s first NCAA title but he missed the last shot of the preceding games when he had those opportunities but he was still willing to take that last shot when it meant the most. That’s the persistence factor that—you really got to have and it’s got to motivate you to continue to work harder and harder and it’s the reason why we’ve got a generation that we really have to work hard on because we’ve had participatory trophies for everyone and competitiveness taught is a very, very, healthy thing for all kids and for all people because life is competitive. I think we try to put icing on that cake that’s just unrealistic and we’ve had a generation of parents that have done the exact same thing and we’re kind of paying the price right now for that.  

 

Jim Rembach:    And the Fast Leader legion wishes you the very best. Now before we move on let’s get a quick word from our sponsor.

 

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Jim Rembach:    Alright, here we go Fast Leader legion it’s time for the Hump Day Hoedown. Okay, Jeff, the Hump day hoedown is the part of our show where you give us good insights fast. So I’m going to ask you several questions and your job is to give us robust yet rapid responses that are going to help us move onward and upward faster. Jeff Piersall, are you ready to hoedown? 

 

Jeff Piersall: Let’s hoedown. 

 

Jim Rembach:    Alright. What do you think is holding you back from being an even better leader today? 

 

Jeff Piersall: I think the biggest thing that’s holding me back right now is just believing that we can do this on a global level, it’s just mindset and I work on it every day. 

 

Jim Rembach:    What is the best leadership advice you have ever received? 

 

Jeff Piersall: Believing you first. 

 

Jim Rembach:    What is one of your secrets that you believe contributes to your success? 

 

Jeff Piersall: I work hard and my faith is my guiding light. 

 

Jim Rembach:    What do you feel is one of your best tools that helps you lead in business or life? 

 

Jeff Piersall: Respect for other people. 

 

Jim Rembach:    What would be one book that you’d recommend to our listeners and it could be from any genre, of course we’re going to put a link to, Dogs don’t bark at Parked Cars, on your show notes page as well. 

 

Jeff Piersall: John Wooden on leadership is a must for everybody. 

 

Jim Rembach:    Okay, Fast Leader legion you can find links to that another bonus information from today’s show by going too fastleader.net/jeffpiersall. Okay, Jeff, this is my last hump day hoedown question: Imagine you were given the opportunity go back to the age of 25 and you have been given the opportunity to take the knowledge and skills that you have now back with you but you can’t take everything back you can only choose one. So, what skill or piece of knowledge would you take back with you and why? 

 

Jeff Piersall: It’s what I’ve learned in discernment of people. Having the people around you that you want to be most like. I’ve had people around me and I think most of us do this that we think we like and we enjoy because they’re addressing weaknesses of ourselves and it’s not our weaknesses that we need to be focused on we need to have the people around us to continue to challenge us continue to move us up and people we admire people of great character. And when I made that shift it’s made a huge shift in my life the same way but the people choices have been probably the single greatest lesson I would have corrected. 

 

Jim Rembach:    Jeff it was an honor to spend time with you today can you please share with the Fast Leader legion how they can connect with you?

 

Jeff Piersall: Yes sir, you sure can. If you just go to Jeff Piersall in either Facebook, Linkedin, or my website www.jeffpiersall.com and you can get to any of our businesses from jeffpiersall.com and also the book and we’d love to be able to stay in connection with all of you.

 

Jim Rembach:     Jeff Piersall, thank you for sharing your knowledge and wisdom the Fast Leader Legion honors you and thanks you for helping us get over the hump. 

 

Thank you for joining me on the Fast Leader show today, for recaps, links from every show special offers and access to download and subscribe, if you haven’t already, head on over the fastleader.net so we can help you move onward and upward faster. 

 

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