page title icon 181: Chris Dyer: In mid-air you change directions a few times

Chris Dyer Show Notes Page

Chris Dyer quit his job and started a business in 2001, just two months after the biggest terrorist attack in American history. He took inspiration from tragedy. He rented every room in his house to pay the mortgage, created a backup plan and took the risk.

Chris was born and raised in Orange County, CA. He has two younger brothers, and his parents are still together. Growing up his parents created many opportunities for the brothers to travel and play, all while giving them a great deal of independence. Chris claims today’s helicopter parents might faint if they watched his childhood unfold. He hung out with adults, learned from neighbors, made new friends at the campground, and in many ways had to fend for himself. With three boys at the dinner table there was never enough food. Not because his parents didn’t try, but because the boys’ appetites seemed to be unquenchable.

As Chris entered high school, his abilities to navigate situations independently thrust him into leadership roles. Chris was captain of the water polo, soccer, and swimming teams. He was class president and he served in a leadership role with the school all four years. Involved in drama, computers, and anything related to school spirit, his ability to learn and lead served him well. Chris’ early career started in college, as he coached hundreds of children in competitive swimming. After he graduated, he held a few key jobs and then started his own company in 2001.

Chris Dyer is the Founder and CEO of PeopleG2, a background check and intelligence firm based in California and author of the book The Power of Company Culture. He is the host of the live radio show TalentTalk on OC Talk Radio and iHeartRadio, an in-demand speaker on company culture, remote workforces, and employee engagement, and a frequent contributor to Forbes, Inc, HR.com, the Society for Human Resource Management, and more.

Chris still lives in Orange County, CA, married his high school sweetheart Jody, and his three adopted kids from Russia, Luba, Dmitri and Vladimir.

Tweetable Quotes and Mentions

Listen to @chrisdyer7 to get over the hump on the @FastLeaderShow Click to Tweet  

“If you got to go to work every day you might as well love it.” -Chris Dyer Click to Tweet  

“Not everyone is transparent in the same way.” -Chris Dyer Click to Tweet 

“Being a positive company is very much about the vocabulary and the approach.” -Chris Dyer Click to Tweet 

“The average company or the average person would say, what’s the problem or let’s problem solve.” -Chris Dyer Click to Tweet 

“When we give people information and help them understand why we want the change, you get more and more acceptance.” -Chris Dyer Click to Tweet 

“The number one thing they keep coming back to that makes people happy and engaged in the workforce, is that they were heard.” -Chris Dyer Click to Tweet 

“Go do the thing that scares you – go do the big thing you’re not prepared for.” -Chris Dyer Click to Tweet 

“You have to be prepared for failure.” -Chris Dyer Click to Tweet 

“If you’re going to ask someone who’s never done it and never taken a risk in their life, they’re going to tell you that you shouldn’t.” -Chris Dyer Click to Tweet 

“When it comes to business and life decisions, we often take opinions from people who’ve never done anything like that before.” -Chris Dyer Click to Tweet 

“Revel in the success of being able to help people and love it.” -Chris Dyer Click to Tweet 

“The more you can learn the better decisions you can make going down the road.” -Chris Dyer Click to Tweet 

Hump to Get Over

Chris Dyer quit his job and started a business in 2001, just two months after the biggest terrorist attack in American history. He took inspiration from tragedy. He rented every room in his house to pay the mortgage, created a backup plan and took the risk.

Advice for others

Surround yourself with people that have done it before.

Holding him back from being an even better leader

Knowledge. I feel like I can always learn more.

Best Leadership Advice

It’s your job to deal with the tough things and you need to learn to enjoy it. Revel in the success of being able to help people and love it.

Secret to Success

Follow through.

Best tools that helps in Business or Life

Books

Recommended Reading

The Power of Company Culture: How any business can build a culture that improves productivity, performance and profits

Work Clean: The life-changing power of mise-en-place to organize your life, work, and mind

Contacting Chris Dyer

website: https://www.chrispdyer.com/

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/chrisdyer7/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/chrisdyer7

Resources and Show Mentions

Call Center Coach

An Even Better Place to Work

Show Transcript: 

Click to access edited transcript

181: Chris Dyer: In mid-air you change directions a few times

Intro: Welcome to the Fast Leader Podcast, where we uncover the leadership like hat that help you to experience, break out performance faster and rocket to success. And now here’s your host, customer and employee engagement expert and certified emotional intelligence practitioner, Jim Rembach.

 

Call center coach develops and unites the next generation of call center leaders. Through our e-learning and community individuals gain knowledge and skills in the six core competencies that is the blueprint that develops high-performing call center leaders. Successful supervisors do not just happen so go to callcentercoach.com to learn more about enrollment and download your copy of the Supervisor Success Path e-book now.

 

Jim Rembach:   Okay, Fast Leader legion today I’m excited because I have somebody on the show today who’s going to give us a much better perspective on something that so many organizations struggle with. Chris Dyer was born and raised in Orange County, California. He has two younger brothers and his parents are still together. Growing up his parents created many opportunities for the brothers to travel and play all while giving them a great deal of Independence. Chris claims today’s helicopter parents might faint if they watched his childhood unfold. He hung out with the adults, learned from neighbors, made new friends at the campground and in many ways had to fend for himself. 

 

With three boys at the dinner table there was never enough food not because his parents didn’t try but because boy’s appetite seemed to be unquenchable. As Chris entered high school his abilities to navigate situations independently thrust him into leadership roles. Chris was captain of the water polo, soccer and swim teams. He was class president and he served in a leadership role with the school all four years. Involved in drama computers and anything related to school spirit his ability to learn and lead served him well. 

 

Chris’s early career started in college as he coached hundreds of children in competitive swimming. After he graduated he held a few key jobs and then started his own company in . Chris Dyer is the founder and CEO of People G—a background check and intelligence firm based in California and the author of the book, The Power of Company Culture. He is a host of the live radio show, Talent Talk, on OC Talk Radio and iHeartRadio, an in demand speaker on company culture, remote workforces, employee engagement and a frequent contributor to Forbes, Inc, HR.com, and a Society for Human Resource Management and more. Chris still lives in Orange County, California. Married to his school sweetheart, Jody, and adopted three children from Russia, Luba, Dmitri and Vladimir. Chris Dyer, are you ready to help us get over the hump?

 

Chris Dyer:   I’m ready, let’s go. 

 

Jim Rembach:   I’m glad you’re here. Now I’ve given my legion a little bit about you but can you share what your current passion is so that we can get to know you even better.

 

Chris Dyer:   Yeah, my current passion right now is really talking about the book and our company culture really trying to help employers and employees have a better work day. If you got to go to work every day you might as well love it you might as well be effective and you might as well have a relationship with your employer that you love. 

 

Jim Rembach: So speaking of a relationship with the employer with a lot of the work that you guys do at PeopleG, how do you actually see that manifest itself with the clients that you’re working with?

 

Chris Dyer:   There’s an odd kind of mix here between our core work and then the work that I do more without leadership standpoint. My four business does background checks and we are really focused—our purpose is to try to make the world a slightly safer place. We look at stopping that sex offender from getting that job at a daycare center and you would think that would never happen that they would never even try and yet they do, it’s like a magnet for them. Or keeping that that person who had been embezzling money from having access to your money or your stocks or whatever it may be. And so that’s a really important thing that we do—we feel like that helps create that environment where the right people are getting the right jobs. On a personal level actually I think that most people should be eligible for jobs but not—our business is not about keeping people from getting jobs it’s about ensuring that the right person is in the right job and that the wrong person is not the wrong job, that’s going to cause a problem.

 

Jim Rembach:   Well, I think that’s a really interesting clarifying point that you just made at the end. For me as somebody who’s been part of using an organization such as your own that’s not the perception that we typically may get it’s more so of something that has negative connotations to it. But I appreciate you actually seeing the positive side to it as well. And I also think that when you start looking at the Seven Pillars of Culture Success that you have outlined in the book for the most part are some positive things and there’s a negative that got flipped into a positive, we’ll talk about that in a second, but many of these things seem like they’re just everybody should know them they’re common sense, why these seven pillars?

 

Chris Dyer:   Right, so I went back and I really realized we had a big problem in 2008 2009, recession hit and it was obvious that this was a great moment for me to work on the company maybe reinvent the company because we had a lot of time on our hands there wasn’t a whole lot of orders coming in business was down we had a lot of time to reflect. So I took that time to say, let’s make the company better we know the recession is not going to stay forever at some point they’re going to get better when it does I want us to be the best version. I noticed everybody else was laying off their best people they were cutting everything they could and when the recession started to shift they weren’t ready to take advantage we were because we were back sharpening our swords and doing our rocky montage we were getting ready for when it was really time to jump back in. I realized that it wasn’t a great kind of blueprint for what is a great company culture. Do I have to go and try to be exactly Google? Do I have to go hunt down the CEO of Zappos and do a mind meld with him? How do I go from where I am today to being a great company culture? And it really set me on this path to learn, to read, to ask as many questions of really smart people who I admired who are killing it what they did, how they did it and then that led me to the radio show and sort of interviewing these people on a more formal basis and I came to this conclusion that the best companies ones who are doing really well that we all admire that are in the newspaper all the time and everyone wants to work for they’re doing these seven things. Maybe they use a different vocabulary, maybe they don’t quite you say it the same way but they all do these seven things really, really, really well and that’s what makes them great it’s not ultimately what they do with it. If we say transparencies code number one, we start with transparency. Not everyone is transparent the same way they don’t apply it the same way but it is important to their company and they find a way to talk about it and to make it work for them. And how it works for them is different it’s how it works for a company down the street but because they are intentionally thinking and talking about it that’s what’s important. 

 

Jim Rembach:   So then going down the rest of the list you have positivity, I think that’s so important, because for me I always see people focus on the negative side and especially when you start talking about the strategic planning process and people you going to SWOT analysis for example. First of all the acronym itself going through the public education system, SWOT, meant something that really wasn’t good. Plus you’re also talking about your weaknesses and threats and everybody just focuses on that too much. At a matter of fact there was a study that came out that said 85 percent of the discussion that happens in the boardroom is all negative threat based talk. If you’re spending all that time on negativity what do you actually generating? You’re generating more negativity, you’re giving it fuel.

 

Chris Dyer:   Right. 

 

Jim Rembach:   How does a company actually make that switch especially when you start talking about a legacy company? It’s easy for us to say, okay we’re going to start anew, you really can’t do that you have to transform. How do you from that negative state to having more positivity? 

 

Chris Dyer:   Actually being a positive work force positive company is very much about the vocabulary and the approach. At some point you are going to have to talk about weaknesses and threats and things like that, that’s going to come out. But to your point if you are starting with a focus of the positive like you say, what are we doing well? We get into a meeting and we’re having an issue internally the first thing I’ll try to bring everyone back to earth. What are we doing well? What’s working? Let’s start there. We get everyone baseline there we know what’s working we know what we’re doing well. Now, the average company or the average person would say what’s the problem? 

 

Let’s problem solve or let’s deal with this difficult thing. What we say is, where’s our opportunity to get better? Where’s our opportunity to help enlighten or to show someone what they need to know? And when you just phrase it that way it’s amazing how different the whole story changes as opposed to—I have someone internally that likes to say, oh, this is a difficult client. And I’m like, I go back and say no. This is a helpful client because they tell us when we don’t do things right they are vocal about their displeasure they’re vocal about things that they want changed. The only way we’re going to get better is if we have that kind of vocal client as opposed to someone who says nothing who doesn’t tell you and then just leaves you it goes to your competitor because they don’t want to conflict.

 

Jim Rembach:   So the other pillars that are part of the culture success are measurement, acknowledgement, uniqueness, listening and mistakes. Instead of going into those there’s something else that you had in the book to me that just stood out and I think it was so important for us to discuss and that is what you call the levels of understanding and you refer to it down at the individual level. But what do you really mean by that levels of understanding?

 

Chris Dyer:   The levels of understanding is a nice little X Y axis we could build here but not to terrorize anybody with thoughts of algebra. Essentially if you imagine the diagonal line going from low on the left and it’s getting up and higher to the right. And if I came to you and said, hey, I’ve got an idea for a business, do you want to invest? You probably say, I need to know a little more of that Chris. , your answer should be no. Then he walk up to you and say, give me money I have an idea. If you look at that example we often go to employees and say, I need you to do this thing and we don’t tell them why we don’t explain we don’t give them the background we don’t share with them anything we just say—instead of doing it this way you got to do it this way now and they’re like, why? You don’t get to know that, that’s board room you just got to do it. Then you get resistance. 

 

Of course you get resistance they don’t understand why there’s no reason for it they like doing it the way they’re doing it and that you’re going to have conflict in general and you have unhappy employees. So when we give people more information we help them understand more and more of why we want the change you get more and more acceptance. You get passive acceptance to give them a little more information you might get actual acceptance they really deeply understand and they’re passionate about whatever it is you’re asking them to do or to think about. You may even get them to be champions you may get them to be so excited about they’re going to go around telling everyone else in the company they should change. So, I find this is all about information it’s all about training and conversations. One the really big discoveries or really big things that a lot of if it’s Gallup or the Harvard Business all these incredible surveys and data that’s been done about employee engagement the number one thing they keep coming back to them makes people happy and engaged in the workforce is that they were heard. It’s not getting paid more money it’s not a pizza party all these other things that people think about it’s just, was I’m heard? 

 

And often that’s a part of this level of understanding. I’m going to tell you why we want you to do this, this is why it’s important given them that opportunity to tell you how they feel what’s going on instead of pushing the green button you start pushing the red button or just make it super simple and then they say why. Well, if you push the green button now this is going to happen so explaining why. But if I don’t do the green button that you have a conversation the person gets to be heard and ultimately this is the opportunity for the people on the top—the boardroom,  the CEO, the senior level management to get the important information back to them that maybe some of their decisions are stupid. Maybe the people at the top don’t always make perfect decisions and don’t always know everything they need to know and are asking people internally to do things that don’t make a lot of sense. So you have that two-way street have that conversation you make sure they understand you’re going to understand them better and you’re going to be able to enact change much quicker.

 

Jim Rembach:   And I really like the way that you laid it out, what you essentially were just talking through within me looking right now at the levels of understanding table it’s saying from an individual understanding perspective moving to and understanding what the potential engagement may be from that and then also the level of support that you’re going to get from those individuals. If there’s no understanding on the individuals part there are more than likely going to be oppositional they’re not going to be neutral they’re me oppositional and you’re not going to get any support from them you’re going to get the resistance in the friction like you’re talking about. And then the next step you go into, well they’re unaware so they just really don’t know all the details they may know something about it they’re going to be indifferent and they’re going to be neutral moving all the way up to going to cognizant knowledgeable and then that deep insight. And to me it’s also one of those things going back to the pillars that you’d have to incorporate so if we’re going to help with the—our levels of understanding the positivity is our main focus. We’re going to talk about—yeah, we’ve tried things like this before we’ve made some mistakes so that’s taking some of the negativity and flipping it into a positive so there’s a lot of ways that you can incorporate those pillars into this level of understanding and really work at that change process and hopefully have it be bi-directional. We’re doing bottom-up and then we’re also doing top-down and that will ultimately will help with your transformation process.

 

Chris Dyer:   Absolutely. When you can add that in there it adds so much to your company just that simple process of, can I be transparent and explain to you? Can we measure this? Can we have a conversation? And we make sure that everybody’s heard. You just slow down for just a moment—I forget where I heard this statement, sometimes you have to slow down to speed up. And that is really true when it comes to change when it comes to asking employees to do things differently or to enact something new inside of an organization. You got to slow down and get everybody on board and then, man, does things speed up really quickly once everyone’s there.

 

Jim Rembach:   Okay, so I think you just described where the Fast Leader show comes from in that it’s not about shortcuts it’s not about making hacks that will take steps out what it’s about is slowing down doing the right things and that’s how you get your velocity. 

 

Chris Dyer:   Right. 

 

Jim Rembach:   Thanks for sharing that. Now what we’re talking about here the transformation process being able to really make these changes within individuals and an individual’s all the way from the front line all the way up to the top of the organization there’s a lot of passion that does go into it a lot of energy that we need. One of the things that we focus on the show are quotes to help us give some of that. Is there a quote or two that you like that you can share?

 

Chris Dyer:   One of my favorite people is Betty Davis, she’s just an ornery funny lady. I remember get hearing this quote from her and it’s always stuck with me which was, attempt the impossible in order to improve your work. It’s just a reminder that you have to—I struggle with this concept of crawl, walk and run and then I’ve heard a lot and there’s some Six Sigma stuff around that but that’s never really works for me it’s more like the jump off the cliff. Go do the thing that scares you. Go do the big thing you’re not prepared for take on the client there’s no way in the world you should be able to service and figure out how to do it, take the big leap. Maybe if I have my organization was as big as Google or something maybe I would be able to change that but for now I like just going after the impossible that’s how we grow that’s how we get better that’s how we find new and awesome things to do as opposed to this tiny little incremental changes. 

 

Jim Rembach:   Talking about that risk and jumping off and all that we often talk about humps that we have to get over. I have to say Chris—reading your bio being a captain on many sports teams being part of student government starting your business at an early age and having success—have you really had any humps to get over Chris?

 

Chris Dyer:   Absolutely. Everyday I’ve screwed it up too many times to even remember and I think what people need to remember is that they have to be prepared for failure you’re prepared to have mistakes and have that parachutes or that cushion at the bottom of the of the building if you don’t make the jump. You can’t forget about what happens but you need to take those leaps and those risks. I could have kept working at a very steady job working for somebody else and in 2001 right after 911 two months after I quit my job and went and started a business in the middle of a recession after the biggest terrorist attack in American history that  was probably the riskiest thing I’ve ever done. But I knew when I watched those planes at those towers that I did not want to spend the rest of my life working for somebody else and hating my work. I hated where I worked I hated what I was doing I took inspiration from tragedy and said, I want to go do something I love to do and do what I’ve been dreaming of and not waste my life. And then of course I made sure I had a back-up plan, if they didn’t work out how was I’m going to eat? How was I going to survive? I rented out every room in my house so that I could pay the mortgage. I did other things to make sure I wasn’t going to end up in the cardboard box on the street but I took the risk nonetheless.

 

Jim Rembach:   Okay, so I’m sure like with many of us and you start talking about just jumping and doing all of that there’s that point at which you have that hesitation even a lot of people that are around you saying no don’t do it. So, for you when you were going through that what happened at that moment? 

 

Chris Dyer:   Well, it was a lot of sleepless nights you worry and you second-guess and you think through it recalculate and you pivot you do all these things because you take that jump and I think what people don’t tell you is that in midair of that jump you actually change directions a few times and maybe you don’t end up landing where you intended to land when you first pull that left off that cliff and that’s okay you figure it out as you go along. One of the biggest things too is to make sure if anyone who is thinking about taking a big leap or thinking about doing something like that’s scary to them is you need to find people who can be mentors for you who have done it who have been successful at it. And you need to socialize with them and get their opinions and everyone else you need to shut the heck up. , that’s the nicest way that’s not how I really wanted to say it but that’s the nicest way I’ll say it on the podcast. Everyone else will just distract from you they will tell you no because they’re too afraid to do it. And if you’re going to ask your neighbor or your cousin or someone else who’s never done it who’s never taken a risk in their life they’re going to tell you no because they care about you and they want to keep you safe and they think they’re giving you the best advice to do that but that’s not going to get where you need to go. You need to talk to someone who’s been an entrepreneur, who’s taken the risk, who has had failure in the past too and knows how to help you navigate that and really use them as your guide. If I was going to go climb a mountain I wouldn’t ask my neighbor who’s never climbed that mountain how to get to the top I’d ask someone who’s done it before. And yet when it comes to business and life decisions we often take opinions from people who’ve never done anything like that before and allow it to keep us down.

 

Jim Rembach:   That’s an excellent point that everybody really needs to walk away with. There’s so many of these folks out there that talk about who you surround yourself with who are your influencers and who you congregate with and who you listen to. That other side that you said is so important is that the people who are closest to you are going to protect you they have this block that they just won’t be able to get over very few can that they’re going to want to not give you the bad news and what they see. But then also like you said you almost have to ask them that question, would you do it yourself? And if they’re saying no don’t take their advice. 

 

Jim Rembach:   If you’re following your passion and make sure you got that parachute, I say take the risk and give it a try. Calculate the risk you don’t want to end up losing your home and your car and everything—your marriage and everything else. That’s not a risk with a parachute but—you can go try your business, a lot of people start a business and they keep working during their day job until they get far enough along there’s lots of ways to do it.

 

Jim Rembach:   Even from inside an organization perspective there are certain things that you may see that you want to undertake or areas or avenues of the business that you see opportunities and personal growth and  you thought you have to take that risk in order to be that entrepreneur the one who’s the innovator and all of that and you can’t allow things around you and people around you and even quite frankly looking at the organization itself and what they’ve done the past to stop you have to keep moving forward.  

 

Chris Dyer:   Hmm-hmm absolutely.

 

Jim Rembach:   You got a lot of things going on you—you have kids the book the company, there’s a whole lot of moving parts that are happening here but when you start thinking about a goal that you have what would be one goal?

 

Chris Dyer:   Yeah, I’m really trying to figure out what’s the right thing for me as it relates to the book. I’ve written the book and I do a lot of speaking around that and I’m actually been doing a lot of reflection on what does that mean? Where do I want that to go? Is this something nice to have? Is that something I transition into all the time where I do more thought leadership and write more books or do all that? I’ve done this and I’m going to stick with what I’m doing. So, my goal right now is to figure that out. 

 

Jim Rembach:   And the Fast Leader legion wishes you the very best. Now before we move on let’s get a quick word from our sponsor.

 

An even better place to work is an easy-to-use solution that gives you a continuous diagnostic on employee engagement along with integrated activities that will improve employee engagement and leadership skills in everyone. Using this award winning solutions guaranteed to create motivated, productive, and loyal employees who have great work relationships with our colleagues and your customers. To learn more about an even better place to work visit beyondmorale.com/better. 

 

Jim Rembach:     Alright, here we go Fast Leader legion it’s time for the Hump Day Hoedown. Okay, Chris, the Hump Day Hoedown is a part of our show where you give us good insights fast. I’m going to ask you several questions and your job is to give us a robust yet rapid responses that are going to help us move onward and upward faster. Chris Dyer, are you ready to hoedown?

 

Chris Dyer:   I’m ready. 

 

Jim Rembach:   Alright. What do you think is holding you back from being an even better leader today?

 

Chris Dyer:   Probably knowledge. I feel like I could always learn more. There’s always that—remember that movie the Matrix, where he would sit down and they’re like injected, like do you know Kung-Fu? Now you do. That’s like my dream, that I could just have information installed to my head in a matter of seconds. I think knowledge is one the more I learn the better off I am.  

 

Jim Rembach:   What is the best leadership advice you have ever received?

 

Chris Dyer:   I joined a CEO group a few years ago and one day of my mentors turn to me and said, Chris the day I realized that I’m the CEO and it’s my job to deal with the tough stakes the big stakes the big issues of the day and started enjoying it my whole life changed and that perspective really change. I used to be upset when people would bring me these big—I was like, oh, another thing I got to do. But as a CEO that’s my job that’s why I get paid the big bucks I’m supposed to deal with the big stuff. So, I started enjoying it and being happy when people came to do with that and reveling in the success of being able to help people and that was a big shift for me.  

 

Jim Rembach:   What is one of your secrets that you believe contributes to your success? 

 

Chris Dyer:   I think follow-through. I recently had on Facebook, I was talking about the book and someone made a comment like, sort of I do so many things how do I do it and someone popped it and say, oh, Chris’s actually follows through. And I went, that’s a really good way to kind of categorize a lot of people who dream about doing things if I decide I want to do something and I put that down as a goal and I thought it’s true I follow through and I think that’s been one of the big reasons why I’ve been able to do the things I’ve done.  

 

Jim Rembach:   What do you feel is one of your best tools that helps you lead in business or life?

 

Chris Dyer:   Books. Absolutely books. The more you can get perspectives and learning and find inspiration as humans we only know what we know.  When we have to make a conclusion or a decision we only take the information that’s in our head to be able to make the best conclusion or decision we can. So, the more you can learn the better decisions you can make going down the road. 

 

Jim Rembach:   What would be one book that you’d recommend to our listeners and it could be from any genre, of course we’re going to put a link to The Power of Company Culture, on your show notes page as well.

 

Chris Dyer:   Thank you for shamelessly plugging my book first so I don’t have to do it. But yeah, I just recently read a book that I absolutely love it has changed my life it is called Work Clean, and it is this amazing kind of—if you love cooking shows or you like to know about chefs and food you’re into that and you also want to talk about work productivity from work standpoint it’s an awesome kind of marriage of the two. I realized that my messy office and my sloppy ways and my messy bag not only was a problem but it was probably because I didn’t have an actual process I didn’t have a system no one ever taught me how to be organized personally. I’m very organized in the computer and with my business and my goals but personally I’m kind of a slob. And I like things clean I didn’t mind to clean them, this book just unleashed a system for me and my life has totally changed. I’ve redone my office redone my closet re-organized my home the stress level has nearly evaporated from just having clutter everywhere so I highly recommend it. 

 

Jim Rembach:   Okay, Fast Leader legion, you can find links to that and other bonus information from today’s show by going to fastleader.net/Kumar Mehta. Okay, Kumar this is my last Hump Day Hoedown question: Imagine you were given the opportunity go back to the age of 25 and you’ve been given the opportunity to take the knowledge and skills that you have now back with you but you can’t take everything back you choose one. So what skill or piece of knowledge would you take back with you and why? 

 

Chris Dyer:   This is going to sound a little bit bad but I think I’m going to take back stock market knowledge and go back and be able to invest correctly. But I say that in the sense that I would love to be able to: A. make a bunch of money off knowing which the right stocks are. But then B: maybe take that money and do something really great with it from a charity standpoint knowing some of the things that have happened since that time right. Some of the tragedies some of the places where we could make an impact. I’ll keep a little extra for myself for my yacht but he rest of it we can send to charity and maybe impact people of hurricanes and floods and all these  things that out there that we could really impact. 

 

Jim Rembach:   Chris, it was an honor to spend time with you today. Can you please share with a Fast Leader legion how they can connect with you? 

 

Chris Dyer:   Sure you can find me on Linkedin, Chris Dyers. You can find me on Twitter, chrisdyer7. Facebook, Snapchat, all that. I’m sure you can find me somewhere. Happy to connect and you can also go to culturetoceo.com, if you want to learn more about my speaking gigs, the book or anything else or you could find the book on Amazon. 

 

Jim Rembach:   Chris Dyer, thank you for sharing your knowledge and wisdom the Fast Leader legion honors you and thanks you for helping us get over the hump. Woot! Woot!

 

Thank you for joining me on the Fast Leader show today. For recaps, links from every show special offers and access to download and subscribe, if you haven’t already, head on over the fastleader.net so we can help you move onward and upward faster. 

 

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