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014: Ramesh Subramanian: Be ready to hit it

Ramesh Subramanian Show Notes

Ramesh lived a nomadic type of life in his early years. He found himself with an entirely new set of friends every few years. This had a profound impact on Ramesh as he wanted to grow and learn but was delayed by not having strong friendships. Being able to learn how to connect better and prepare better has helped him to have a better career and life. Listen to Ramesh tell his story about what he learned and what has helped him to be successful in a career with global responsibilities so you can move onward and upward faster.

Ramesh calls himself a nomad as he was born in the East of India, moved to the south of India, and then to the west of India for his education.
His father worked for an oil company and the family moved every 3-4 years. At a young age, Ramesh was fascinated with computers even though it was not prevalent during the day. Eventually he received a bachelors in computer science from Pune University. And then followed his father’s footsteps and received a Master’s in Marketing.

Ramesh started his career in consulting and worked in Malaysia, Singapore, Germany, Denmark, UK, Sweden, Brazil, and Thailand before coming to the US.
Now Ramesh considers himself a global citizen and loves to meet people from various cultures and experiences and creating his family’s social network. But to no surprise he does not want to uproot his family.

In Ramesh’s current role he creates strategies for consumer care and identifies and cross-pollinates best practices across various global markets for Electrolux.

Ramesh and his lovely wife Megana are the proud parents of two young children, Ishita and Ishan.

Tweetable Quotes and Mentions

Check out @rameshdon getting over the hump on @FastLeaderShow Click to Tweet

“If you don’t learn you are obsolete.” -Ramesh Subramanian Click to Tweet

“Life experiences teach you more than any book can.” -Ramesh Subramanian Click to Tweet

“You need to give people time to ensure that they understand you are worthy of their trust.” -Ramesh Subramanian Click to Tweet

“Trust is foundational to any relationship.” -Ramesh Subramanian Click to Tweet

“Always know there will be curve-balls and be ready to hit it.” -Ramesh Subramanian Click to Tweet

“There has to be a level of thrill in whatever you do.” -Ramesh Subramanian Click to Tweet

“When you are doing something you feel is adventurous you give more than 100%.” -Ramesh Subramanian Click to Tweet

“First and foremost I would have more emphasis on people.” -Ramesh Subramanian Click to Tweet

“People together contribute significantly.” -Ramesh Subramanian Click to Tweet

“As I grew up I realized the importance of people.” -Ramesh Subramanian Click to Tweet

Hump to Get Over

Ramesh moved are a lot as young boy and as a young adult. Building a new set of friends every few years that could help him adapt and thrive was a difficult hump. It’s one that Ramesh got over after a lot of lessons were learned. Listen to Ramesh share many stories about his life that have allowed him to be successful with his responsibilities for a global consumer brand. Through his life experiences we can all learn some valuable lessons about how to adjust, connect and get ahead. Ramesh shares an amazing story about his arranged marriage and the roller coaster ride his wife had after they were married.

Leadership Epiphany

Always prepare for the curveballs because they will always come.

Advice for others

  1. Have a plan to take care of your family first.
  2. How adventurous can you make your life?
  3. Try to be patient.

Holding him back from being an even better leader

Being more patient

Best Leadership Advice Received

A man is but the product of his thoughts what he thinks, he becomes.

Secret to Success

Insatiable desire to learn

Best Resources in Business or Life

My crooked mind…always figuring a way out.

Recommended Reading

Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap…And Others Don’t
First, Break All the Rules: What the World’s Greatest Managers Do Differently
Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done
Our Iceberg Is Melting: Changing and Succeeding under Any Conditions

Contacting Ramesh

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/pub/ramesh-subramanian/5/a96/17b
Twitter: https://twitter.com/rameshdon
Email: rameshdon [at] yahoo.com

More Resources

54 Emotional Intelligence (EQ) Competencies List: Emotional Intelligence has proven to be the right kind of intelligence to have if you want to move onward and upward faster. Get your free list today.

Show Transcript: 

Click to access edited transcript

014: Ramesh Subramanian: Be ready to hit it

Intro: Welcome to the Fast Leader Podcast, where we explore convenient yet effective shortcuts that will help you get ahead and move forward faster by becoming a better leader. And now here’s your host, customer and employee engagement expert and certified emotional intelligent practitioner, Jim Rembach.

Jim Rembach:   Thanks Kimberly. Okay Fast Leader legion, I have the nomad today, he’s a good friend of mine, and his name is Ramesh Subramanian. He calls himself a nomad because he was born in East India, moved to the South of India and then moved to the west of India for his education. His father worked for an oil company and the family moved every 3 to 4 years. At a young age Ramesh was fascinated with computers, even though it wasn’t necessarily prevalent during the day, but he eventually received the Bachelors in Computer Science from Pune University and then followed his father’s footsteps and received the Masters in Marketing.

Ramesh started his career in consulting and worked in Malaysia, Singapore, Germany, Denmark UK, Sweden, Brazil and Thailand before coming to the US. Now, Ramesh considers himself a global citizen and loves to meet people from various cultures and experiences. But to no surprise he does not want to uproot his family. Ramesh is an avid cricket fan and played against WB Raman who was a player on the India National Team, but Ramesh considers himself to be a better fan than he is a player.

In his current role he creates strategies for consumer care and identifies and cross pollinate best practices across various global markets for Electrolux. Ramesh was a fortunate benefactor of an arranged marriage. He and his lovely wife Megana are the proud parents of two young children Ishita and Ishan. Ramesh Subramanian, are you ready to help us get over the hump?

Ramesh Subramanian:     Absolutely. I’ve never been on a camel but I’ll try. 

Jim Rembach:  That sounds good. I’ve given our listeners a brief introduction but can you please tell us what your current passion is so that we can get to know you better.

Ramesh Subramanian:     Sure. I have multiple passions that kind of ebbs and flows, so to speak. Currently, my passion is essentially on my kids football games and how they are trying learn the game and I’m trying to be a good father figure,  role model, to encourage them to learn the game but I don’t have a clue how to play that game. It’s a very interesting process that we’re going through wherein I encourage them to play and give them a lot of instructions without knowing anything about how to play the game. I feel that I am perfectly fit for leadership and management roles now. 

Jim Rembach:      It’s a good training ground, isn’t it?

Ramesh Subramanian:     No doubt. 

Jim Rembach:      There’s a lot of inspiration on what you just shared right there. Getting to learn something together that’s new creates a much more powerful bond in a lot of ways. I would think that that particular opportunity that you have with them will be something that will resonate and carry forward for everybody’s lifetime and generations, so I commend you on that.

Ramesh Subramanian:     Thank you. 

Jim Rembach:      Oftentimes at the Fast Leader show we look for inspiration in a lot of different ways through the  stories that are told and were looking forward to you sharing some of your life journey. But quotes, passages and those things can really be powerful things for us, is there one that you could share with us that guide you and helps you be the person that you want to be?

Ramesh Subramanian:     There have been many, actually, but there’s one that I think has had a big impact in my life and when I heard of it first I never really understood the gravity or the depth of this saying. The father of the nation of India, Mahatma Gandhi had said this: “Live as if you will die tomorrow and learn as if you will live forever.” And I think that’s extremely powerful and deep statement that he admit. In the context of 1940’s, 1930’s, I’m talking about which is still absolutely relevant even today, it has impact not only on the individual but also society at large. So, essentially, if you look at it—live as if you will die tomorrow, essentially tells you that drive everything with the sense of urgency, that’s what I’m talking about. My interpretation of that is, how you can drive sense of urgency in everything that you do so that you can drive results quickly be it personal life, be it professional life. I’m sure you’ve experienced that when we used to work together, a little bit of my sense of urgency and madness, so to speak. 

The other aspect is about learning continuously. How do you continuously learn because in today’s day and age if you don’t learn you’re not only obsolete but you’re pretty much dumb in the sense that you’re extinct?  That’s very important to understand especially given the 21st century economy and also the competition that our kids are going to face which are very global in nature. So, it has a lot of relevance from a personal standpoint, from a community standpoint as was professional standpoint. 

Jim Rembach:      It sounds like it definitely has even when you started talking about learning new sport with your kids that you have no basis in [inaudible 6:04]The constant reinvention and I would dare to say that it has also made an impact to you as you’ve gone through the chapters in your life. One of our previous guest talks about—you can almost look at it on and retain your marker where you have to reevaluate, reassess, look and see where you’re going, have a better sense of urgency maybe for the next couple of months—that’s ten years, and really chart a path and reinvent yourself on a continuous basis and you just reinforced it, that quote has a very powerful meaning for you. Thank you for sharing.

 Now, I know that with all of the different things that you been through and even when we were working together side-by-side for a while. The challenges that we often face are so varied in nature and sometimes come very rapidly, however, there’s some that really shape and define us more than others. We talk about humps on the Fast Leader show, and we need to get over those humps. Can you remember a time where you’ve had to get over the hump and it was really one of those major defining moments for you, can you share that story with us please arrive?

Ramesh Subramanian:     Absolutely. Funny that you ask that question because there had been several humps, so to speak. I’ll go back to when you were talking about me being a nomad, and why I call myself a nomad. Just to give you a context of that the hump I use to face is we use to have a new set of friends every few years. And as you can imagine, when you’re growing up friends are a very important context of who you are. And what really helped me understand is the importance of friendship, that got instilled in me but I learned about it really, really young, in terms of how important friendship is.

 And it also helped me understand that I need to—the small amount of time that I’m going to spend with whoever that person is, to enjoy the time because those are things that we take for granted but typically they are not. So from young age I would say that was one of the humps that it took me awhile to really understand and adjust because we were moving quite frequently. Again to extend that nomad story, when I move to college, when I went to move to the West of India to do my Bachelors—I don’t know how much you know about India but when you go from the south of India to the rest of India it’s a whole different country, different culture, completely different we don’t even speak the same language there, it’s like you’re learning everything from scratch—the dynamics between people, how to feel part of the society or part of the school, that was a huge learning process, I think. 

And these learnings are never thought in books, these are experiences and I think life experiences teach you more than any book can. While the biggest things I learned through that whole process was—you need to give people time to ensure that they understand your worthy of their trust. Because trust is foundation to any relationship. To some people it is faster than others but time is definitely a factor when you’re essentially trying to get into a new climate or new environment and trying to be part of it. Be it social, be it professional even for that matter be the new school you’re kid go to, there has to be a level of ‘toying’, so to speak, that means to hop.  

So, I think that maturity came during my college years. And I think one which is more relevantly new I would say is when I came to the US first time to live. I travel to the US multiple times for consulting on various for assignments and engagements but about a decade ago, I moved here with my family and my daughter, Ishita is was six months old. When you come here to live the challenges are completely different because you don’t have a Social Security number, you don’t have any credit history and the challenges that a first generation migrant goes through is not easily explained or understood when you are—again you take things for granted. What’s a big deal in getting credit card for example, when you don’t have credit history you will understand how important a credit card is. And to rent a place, because they won’t rent a place to you because you don’t have a credit history. They don’t know that you are not a criminal, for example, because there is no history. 

The initial couple of months, the challenge we went through, especially with my daughter being six months old, we pretty much lived in a hotel suite for about three weeks to a month and that was a very interesting time of our life because it thought me a lot but I think a few things that it did teach me was the importance of being prepared. I think that we we’re not prepared enough, we could have done much better research or much better understanding of what the environment will be where we’re going to. 

And the second I would say is, always know that there will be issues and there will be troubles and be ready to hit it. Don’t just get dejected or down because there are trouble coming at you because they will always come, it’s about the attitude in which you face those troubles. 

Jim Rembach:     There’s so many things, as you were talking that started running through my mind because I know your wife wasn’t the nomad and a traveler that you were, how were you to manage that relationship? 

Ramesh Subramanian:     That’s a phenomenal question, Jim because my wife cannot be more opposite in our life  experiences. When we got married she was about 24 years, and for 24 years she had been in the same house and it was a giant family that they had. In India there is a joint family wherein all the brothers live together with their parents. Her father’s elder brother and younger brother and their kids and wife use to live in the same place—the same house. So for 24 years all she knew was this place, which was in a thousand square feet apartment. Then all of a sudden she gets married to me, and within the first month we were in UK and she didn’t know what hit her. And then we came back to India to have our daughter and six months later we are in the US, so for her, it was a roller coaster ride she didn’t know what was happening to her. 

So, I think she brought a level of –I don’t know what the right word is—she kind of settled me down in a sense that the way I approach towards life was not always about what’s the next, what’s the next, what’s the next, in terms of where am I going to go. That’s also one of the reason why I move from consulting to industry because in consulting you always tend to travel, part of it. You just brought me back to some of the nostalgic things. 

Jim Rembach:  If you start thinking about a piece of advice that you would give our listeners what would it be?

Ramesh Subramanian:     I’m not sure I have enough experiences to give advice but I can definitely share a few things that I think are important. Let me start personal first. First and foremost I think you need to have a plan to make sure to think out the family first, what I mean by that is not only financial but even otherwise. At least that’s the way I was built or that’s what the value system in which I’ve been brought up. So, first and foremost it’s what do you need to do to take care of the family? How adventurous can you make in life? What I mean by that is that the adventure, not in the traditional sense of going bungee jumping, for example—you should do that if you can but there has to be a level of thrill in which we are doing, whatever you do, in my belief. Because when you’re doing something with a lot of zeal and passion and you feel it is adventurous, you give more than 100%. It doesn’t matter what, it really doesn’t matter what it is. 

The third one is, and this is something that I continue to struggle with honestly, is try to be patient. Try to be persistent, persevere and don’t ‘jump the gun quick’. What I mean by that is to be [inaudible 16:09] in any given situation, we are very quick to come to a judgement, very quick to come into conclusion. Certain things take time and the understanding and the maturity and the patience is required but I can just freeze that I don’t practice it as much as I know I should. But I think those three things that I at least, I want to live at. 

Jim Rembach:     So, talking about excitement and zeal and all of that, what is one thing that really excites you about the work that you’re doing today?

Ramesh Subramanian:     Wow! Couple of things, actually. The basic is, thinker of consumer. If you look at any industry that reason you survive is because of having a good customer base or consumer base. The reason for existence of the company as for that matter is because of their consumers. They are the key part of your business.  So, being part of the Consumer Care Organization globally that by itself was a big thrill for me. And I’ve been doing last couple of months, starting Q4 of last year, is I been part of a transformational journey that we have initiated within Electrolux and that’s called the digital transformation. 

So, we are going through and looking at the digital experience that are consumers are having through the Consumer Care journey, or actually the whole journey [inaudible 17:45] to journey that consumers have with us. From pre-purchase to at purchase and post purchase and how can we make sure that they are providing world class experiences to our consumers so that we are top of mind when it comes to brand selection and also they can love our brands and recommend our brands to their friends and family. 

So, we are looking at very specific high intensity touch points where we can leverage that. I think that’s something that’s going to differentiate us in the industry. And I believe that it is going to be not only transformational within our company but also more importantly the people who will touch in this process are going to be enormous, I mean, internal as well as our consumers.

Jim Rembach:     I know the Fast Leader legion wishes you the very best. Alright, now here we go Fast Leader legion. It’s time for the—Hump Day Hoedown. Okay, Ramesh, the Hump Day Hoedown is the part of our show where you give us good insights fast. So, I’ve going to ask you several questions and your job is to give us robust yet rapid responses that are going to help us move onward and upward faster. Ramesh are you ready to hoedown?

Ramesh Subramanian:     Absolutely. 

Jim Rembach::     What do you think is holding you back from being an even better leader today? 

Ramesh Subramanian:     I think I just shared with you Jim, being patient. That’s something that I need to learn and learn fast.

Jim Rembach:     I’m right there with you brother. What is the best leadership advice you have received?

Ramesh Subramanian:     I think the biggest start of a man is by the product of his own parts, what did things he becomes. I don’t know if you heard of that it’s a very powerful advice that I had receive from a couple of people and it helped me to be positive and be optimistic in scenarios and situations because if you think positive you become a positive man. 

Jim Rembach:  What is one of you secrets that you believe contributes to you success at work or at life? 

Ramesh Subramanian:     I think both. Work and life is about learning, insatiable desire to learn. If you don’t learn you become obsolete. 

Jim Rembach:     What do you feel is one of your best resources that helps you lead in business or life?

Ramesh Subramanian:     Well, best resource I would say is my crooked mind. It’s not my crooked mind, I don’t know if you have known in a certain interviews you go they draw a triangle, a circle, a squiggly line and they say in a circle, and they say which one do you relate to the most? And I always go for the squiggly line, and apparently, what that means is you always figure a way out. 

Jim Rembach:     Definitely fits with a nomad status. What would be one book that you would recommend to our listeners?

Ramesh Subramanian:     Oh, wow! There are so many, Jim, I don’t think it’s fair to just give you one book but I’ll give you a few that maybe worthwhile for the readers to consider. One of my favorite is “Good to Great”, First, Break All Rules is a good one, and Execution by Ram Charan is a good one too, if you’re focus on execution and stuff like that. And one of my favorite is “Iceberg is melting” It’s a very famous book, quick read, actually I’m asking my daughter to read it now.  

Jim Rembach:   Okay, Fast Leader listeners, you’ll be able to find links to that and another bonus information from today’s show by going to fastleader.net/Ramesh Subramanian. Okay, Ramesh, here’s the last question on the Hump Day Hoedown: Imagine you woke up tomorrow morning and you were 25 years old again and you’re supposed to begin a new job as a manager of a team that is underperforming and disengaged but you’ve been able to take everything you know and all the skills that you have back with you. Now your task is to turn the team around, you get up, you get ready, you head out to work, what do you do now?

 

Ramesh Subramanian:     Number one, I will be a much more wiser man when I get up, so to speak, when I’m 25 years old. It’s about life’s experiences, like if you learn a lot, and if I get an opportunity to go back and with all this wisdom, I think first and foremost, I’ll have more emphasis on people. I think people together contribute significantly especially in our turn around scenario. The importance from a leadership standpoint is clearly defining the strategic priorities, once the team understand what the strategic priorities are they needed to communicate and get the team together as a unit.  

Defining the strategic priorities is, number one, giving the clear direction and getting them to work as a team is number two. And making sure that they come back and tell us what the socks’ look like for that particular [inaudible 23:11] so how do they contribute to the strategic objective? How do they consider that when they do XYZ they feel that they have contributed to that cause and they will look successful? And that’s something that they have to find for themselves rather than dictating. And some of us has to be objective, [inaudible 15:01]. When it comes to individuals to make them feel a sense of pride in what they do goes a long way to achieve the overall objective. My emphasis is more on people because I did not have the people aspect when I was 25 years old and I think as I grew up I realized the importance of the people aspect of that.  

Jim Rembach:    Ramesh it was an honor to spend time with you today. Can you please share with the Fast Leader legion how they can connect with you?

Ramesh Subramanian:     Sure. You can reach me in LinkedIn, Ramesh Subramanian. And you can email me, rameshdon.atrip@yahoo.com 

Jim Rembach:    Ramesh Subramanian, thank you for sharing your knowledge and wisdom, the Fast Leader legion honors you and thanks you for helping us get over the hump. Woot Woot!

Thank you for joining me on the Fast Leader Show today. For recaps, links from every show, special offers and access to download and subscribe, if you haven’t already, head on over to the fastleader.net so we can help you move onward and upward faster. 

 END OF AUDIO

 

 

 

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013: Gerry Barber: We were dysfunctional

Podcast Show Notes with Gerry Barber

Gerry was fortunate to learn a valuable lesson as a young leader that helped to change his path. Being an eager and confident leader he volunteered to lead a team in a business simulation as part of a leadership development program. Gerry thought he knew a lot about leadership, but he didn’t know what he didn’t know. His first day was a disaster and they were pretty much dysfunctional as a team. Listen to Gerry as he tells his story and the epiphany he had that caused him to turn things around so you can use his experience to move onward and upward faster.

Tweetable Quotes and Mentions

Check out Gerry Barber getting over the hump on the @FastLeaderShow Click to Tweet

“Leadership and learning are indispensable of each other.” JFK told by Gerry Barber Click to Tweet

“If you stop learning you are not going to be a leader for very long.” -Gerry Barber Click to Tweet

“Change is absolute and change is happening so rapidly today.” -Gerry Barber Click to Tweet

“Social media is the future of interactions for our world.” -Gerry Barber Click to Tweet

“When you learn together you become stronger together.” -Gerry Barber Click to Tweet

“Leadership is about influence.” -Gerry Barber Click to Tweet

“Realize your team brings something to the table.” -Gerry Barber Click to Tweet

“To be a great leader you need to be able to give each team member the time they need.” -Gerry Barber Click to Tweet

“Sit down and write your leadership point of view.” -Gerry Barber Click to Tweet

“Keep business simple.” -Gerry Barber Click to Tweet

As a young leader, Gerry got the got the opportunity to participate in a four-year executive management program. The group of 30 people was split into separate teams that would compete against each other in a simulation to run all aspects of a business. Being eager and confident Gerry volunteered to lead his team for the first year. He thought he knew a lot about leadership at that time, but he didn’t know what he didn’t know. That first day he had a very difficult time. He was telling people what to do and was asking folks to do this and that and wasn’t doing some of the things that he really should do as a leader. When the team convened that day they were pretty much dysfunctional as a team. After a long night of reflection about all that went wrong he finally came to the realization that leadership is not about telling people what to do or making decisions.

Leadership Epiphany

Leadership is not about telling people what to do or making decisions, it’s about influence.

Advice for others

Realize your team brings something to the table and while you are the leader it’s a collective experience.

Holding him back from being an even better leader

Limited time to spend developing others.

Best Leadership Advice Received

You need to sit down and write down your leadership point of view.

Secret to Success

Living as a servant leader and putting my people first.

Best Resources in Business or Life

Books and CIAC certification, memories, mentors

Recommended Reading

You Don’t Need a Title to Be a Leader: How Anyone, Anywhere, Can Make a Positive Difference

Leading at a Higher Level, Revised and Expanded Edition: Blanchard on Leadership and Creating High Performing Organizations

The First 90 Days: Proven Strategies for Getting Up to Speed Faster and Smarter, Updated and Expanded

Contacting Gerry

email: gbarber [at] deloitte.com

Phone: 615-882-7792

More Resources

54 Emotional Intelligence (EQ) Competencies List: Emotional Intelligence has proven to be the right kind of intelligence to have if you want to move onward and upward faster. Get your free list today.

Show Transcript: 

Click to access edited transcript

013: Gerry Barber: We were dysfunctional

 

Intro: Welcome to the Fast Leader Podcast, where we uncover the leadership like hat that help you to experience, break out performance faster and rocket to success.  And now here’s your host, customer and employee engagement expert and certified emotional intelligent practitioner, Jim Rembach.

Jim Rembach:   Thanks Kimberly. Okay Fast Leader legion, I am blessed to get the opportunity to introduce to you the person that I get to introduce to today. Gerry Barber has been a longtime friend and I always link to him to help me get over my own hump. He’s full of wisdom. He’s full of reserve energy that is rare and greatly appreciated, I don’t know, maybe he got that from living and growing up on the South side Chicago where he played a lot of baseball, and that’s one of the connections that we have together. I don’t know about the rock ‘n roll drummer that he was trying to be able to become but he had to grow up just like we all do. 

 

He moved into what I would refer to as operational excellence and he work with a lot of organizations and retail customer care and support and has built leaders throughout his own career. Today, he lives just outside of Nashville, Tennessee with his wife Jenny of 38 years and has two grown boys. Gerry Barber, are you ready to help us get over the hump?

 

Gerry Barber:     I’m going to take you up and I’m going to take you over. 

 

Jim Rembach:     Awesome. 

 

Gerry Barber:     Let’s go.

 

Jim Rembach:     Alright. I’ve given our listeners a brief introduction but can you tell us a little bit more about what your current passion is so that we can get to know you better?

 

Gerry Barber:     I’m very passionate about what I do in my work which relates to contact centers and shared services. I have fun every day at the office but when I’m away from the office there are many other things that I like to get involved with. One of those is putting my top down on my little Miata and riding the back roads of Tennessee. It’s a great stress reliever and a fun way just to get lost on a Saturday afternoon, I can’t wait spring is coming and so I should get a lot of days coming up be able to do just that.

 

Jim Rembach:     Thanks for sharing that with me. I appreciate what you had referred to as far as the therapy associated with that and wish you sunny days. So, here on the Fast Leader Show we are always looking for inspirations that will help us get over the hump. And we like to focus in on leadership quotes or passages to help us do that. And I know throughout the course of your career you probably had several that you had to lean on in order to help you. But, is there one that stands out that you’d like to share with our listeners?

Gerry Barber:     Jim, yes. There’s one that throughout my career keeps on being in the forefront of my mind. Leadership and learning are indispensable of each other, that’s a quote by our late great Pres. John F. Kennedy, and simply put that, if you stop learning you’re not going to be a leader for very long. Change is absolute and changes are happening so rapidly today that that quote in itself is more important than any other that I think about on a daily basis.

 

Jim Rembach:    There’s some really important information that we can glean from that. But for you, how do you apply the meaning of that quote in your life today?

 

Gerry Barber:     That’s simple. I subscribe to servant leadership. Servant leadership means simply you put your people first. And when you put your people first that means you want to find the ways that they can grow. Grow in their career, grown in their lives and get satisfaction from what they do. So, I invest a lot of time in my team members and my people to insure that they grow as leaders.

 

Jim Rembach:     You had mentioned something to me before that I stood out when you started talking about having people that are better than you working for you. There’s  so many of us that live in fear and we don’t want transfer what we know to somebody else because—they may take my job—how do you overcome that fear so that you can thrive? 

 

Gerry Barber:     This is a question that’s a difficult challenge for one zig, alright and many of us leaders have somewhat of an ego. I’m going to be honest here, I’m in the twilight of my career, meaning that retirement is only a couple years away. And recently, I have worked very hard to help my team become the best they can be but I’ve also added a team member who I firmly believe has a greater chance of taking our contact center to an even higher level of performance over the years. One of the things that this particular individual brings to the table is a great and deep understanding of social media. Social media is the future of interactions for our world and with her here shall be able to help us move forward. I don’t have that fear anymore, I in fact been embraced the fact that will take the legacy of what we’ve built here and enhance it even more for the new social world. 

 

Jim Rembach:     I guess there’s maybe some struggle that some folks. If there’s somebody who has a particular skill or knowledge and you really develop their skills even more, how do you help that person do just that?

 

Gerry Barber:     One of the things that I’ve used, I was going to talk about it later in our  discussion but I’ll bring it up now, is that I’ve built a lot of learning on having book clubs. And so we’ll take a book and I don’t just sit there and teach, everyone who is part of that book club for the period of time, usually it is six weeks and we meet once a week, we take a chapter or two or three at a time to discuss. Each individual who becomes part of that book club will take a chapter, and the books are great book on leadership, on business or on contact centers. Whatever the flavor of the day is for us to grow we do it together. When you do it together you learn together and you become stronger together.

Jim Rembach:   Oh, some really sage and powerful advice there. However, I know that getting to the point to where you are now and being somebody who’s probably producing leaders at a much faster rate than you did at your youth you had challenges, we all have them, we have humps that we need to get over. Can you think of a time where you had to get over one and that kind of shape and guided you to really where you are today, can you share that with us please?

 

Gerry Barber:     Let me share a story, and you’re going to have to bear with me because this maybe a little drawn out here but I want to get some of the facts out. It’s circa 1983, I was very young leader, and I have been working with Quill Corporation at Lincolnshire, Illinois at that time. I got the opportunity to participate in a four year executive management program put on by the American Management Association. This program was built to meet once a year for a full week and then have homework and deliverables in between the year. So, it was it was set up where we were broken up into five teams of six people, so there’s roughly 30 people if my math is right, participating in the program together for all four years. We came together and on the first morning of the first day I think I had one of the best leadership lessons I could’ve ever had in my career. So, on that first morning we broke up into teams and six of us came together as a new team. 

 

Each of us came from a different business, different business model even maybe a different part of the country, because this was not just exclusively regional, there was folks from L.A. as well as Chicago and Boston and in other points in between. So we got together, and heady me, raise my hand and said I’d like to lead the first year, because he had to name a leader for each year, and I said I would be a leader for the first year. And so there we went on our first day and the object of the of the four years is through simulation run a business, everything from HR management, manufacturing, development and producing a products in paper and theory in this in the simulation all the way to managing profit and loss and managing the business. And at the end of four years, each year you would get rated as to where you were at against the other teams. 

 

So, I took that leadership position, I thought I knew a lot about leadership at that time but I didn’t know what I did know. And so, on that first day I had a very difficult time, I was telling people what to do. I was asking folks to do this, that and wasn’t doing some of the things that we really should do as a leader. When I left that day we were pretty much dysfunctional as a team. I went back to my hotel room and had a lot of time to think about all that went wrong and at the end of the day, and in the beginning of the morning, I came to the realization, and this is my Aha moment, that leadership is not about telling people what to do or making decisions for the larger group, and in fact with this group which is different than what I had managed before, these were all peers. They came from different organizations, they were probably senior managers of this or director of that. And so—why would they listen to me? They didn’t have to. They didn’t have any fear, I wasn’t paying them as would happen in my job before? And thus it occurred to me and that hump that I had to get over was, I had to learn that leadership is about influence that is the lesson that I learned. When I  so when I figured that out, and it’s probably two o’clock in the morning, I got a couple of hours of sleep and we met back again at 8 AM at the facility and I simply apologized to the team for my actions of the day before and that I wasn’t really displaying a leadership view. I was humble about apologizing and that I want to listen and engage and see where we could take it. Well, the good news is that I think alone my humble apology helped influence a change. And from there in the first year we came in second, the five teams. But had I not had that realization, and had I not kept that all these years, I don’t think I’d be the leader I am today. 

 

Jim Rembach:     So many pieces of insight. What you’ve learned that we can leverage to help us get over the hump much faster than we would otherwise. And that epiphany that you shared with us, we called them epiphanies, a lot of times here on the show, I think I’ve even been through myself, but when you look at many different pieces within that story and our Fast Leader Legion having the challenges that they have, what advice would you actually give them to help them move forward faster?

 

Gerry Barber:     Realize that your team brings something to the table and that while your leader assigned or unassigned whatever it is, and you don’t need a title necessarily to be leader—I love that book incidentally by Sanborn—that it’s a collective experience and the idea of trying to come to some clear vision with and for the team is extraordinarily important to success but listening first before doing.

 

Jim Rembach:   Oh, I love that, thank you for sharing that with us. When you start talking about what really excites you today with the work that you’re doing, what is it?

 

Gerry Barber:      While I mentioned I’m in the twilight of my career, I’m having more fun now in my career that I’ve had in all the years prior. I’ve had such tremendous opportunity to really become the leader I wanted to be and to act on that. After six years of leading the Lloyd’s contacts and our operations, I was given the opportunity and responsibility to lead now a full transformation of our expense management operations, which I am so excited about at this point time in my career because I can do all the things that I’ve learned and put them into practice again even at this late date, and I’m enjoying every minute of it. 

 

I’ve been into it a year now, it’s a cultural transformation, it’s a technology transformation, and it’s a process transformation. And while I’ve been in it for a year there’s still a lot of things that we need to do. The cultural side of it I think has been improved and were moving along with the great solid organization with a clear vision and the right strategies in place to be successful over time and take us from good to great and so, I’m excited. Now comes all of the technology and the process improvements that we’ve measured and have said, these are our strategies to the affect transformation. So, now I get to see and be part of a team who will unleash those transformational activities over the next two years before I say goodbye.

 

Jim Rembach:     The Fast Leader legion wishes you the very best. 

 

Gerry Barber:     We’re having fun.

 

Jim Rembach:     Alright, here we go Fast Leader listeners it’s time for the—Hump Day Hoedown. Okay Gerry the Hump Day Hoedown is the part of our show where you give us good insight fast. I’m going to ask you several question and your job is to give us robust yet rapid responses that are going to help us move onward and upward faster. Gerry, are you ready to hoedown?

 

Gerry Barber:     I’m going to try, try my best. 

 

Jim Rembach:     What do you think is holding you back from being an even better leader today?

 

Gerry Barber:     That’s very simple. My time is at a premium and to be a great leader you need to be able to give each team member the time they need to improve themselves. I’m finding it harder and harder with having multiple responsibilities, contact center and the expense management of organization, to give the right amount of time. Hopefully I see my way clearer in about six months where I can really then begin to devote my time to individuals versus just the transformation.

 

Jim Rembach:     What is the best leadership advice you have ever received?

 

Gerry Barber:     Actually it came from a book. And in that book it said: You need to sit down and write your leadership point of view. I think for your legions you’ll understand that it really talks about who you are and how you got to the point of the leader you are, what your expectations are for yourself, and what your expectation is for your team members and your peers in which you do business with or interact on any life situation? And so, that has been very dear to me. 

 

When I came first I had read the book, and the book incidentally, I know you’re going to probably ask me what’s my favorite book, this is it it’s called ‘Leading at a Higher Level’ it’s by the Blanchard group, it’s a copulation of everything they’ve done in the business world on leadership for a good number of years and it’s really great shelf reference as well. It walks you through thinking about and developing your leadership point of view, as well as part of the book. And so,  right before I came to Deloitte I had found that book and was using it as research in my role with CIAC, The Competency and Certification Group that was part of ICMI, and utilize a lot of thought processes from that book as we build competencies work [inaudible 16:34] our leadership.

 

I had used the leadership point of view as my letter to my new teams here at Deloitte when I arrived and I can tell you that it closed a lot of gaps that people normally have like, who the hell is this guy? And what’s he’s going to do us? It was all there in black and white, where I came from, what I believe in, what I expect from myself, and what I expect from them and where we might go as a team together, and it was great. I use it again when I took the leadership role of our expense management organization just a year ago, to also introduce myself and move quickly from ‘we don’t know this guy’ to ‘hey, we’re part of a team. 

 

Jim Rembach:    What do feel is one of your secrets that contributes to your success?

 

Gerry Barber:     I mentioned it earlier and that’s living as a servant leader and putting your people first and making sure that we work together to have a clear vision and chart the right strategies for our journey. That journey continues in the contact center and in our expense management organization. 

 

Jim Rembach:    What do you feel is one of your best resources that helps you lead in business or life?

 

Gerry Barber:     My best resource is always to go to books and I use that leadership at a higher level as a Bible, so it’s a great desk reference, I think I mentioned that earlier, and I go to that. I also believe in the competencies in the art and science of contact center leadership. So, I utilize the developmental manuals that were built for the CIC certification as my guide too in leading contact center. Beyond that its memories and interactions with a couple of great mentors that I had my career. One that comes to mind is Jack Miller who was the patriarch of Quill and got it started and let it for a good many of years before it was sold to Staples. He always told me in business keep it simple. If I’m going to sell you a pen, here’s what it is and here’s how much it cost and you make the transaction and you go on, so keep business simple.

 

Jim Rembach:     Great advice. So, you already mentioned your favorite book were going to take that and give links to that on our show notes page where you’ll be able to find at fastleader.net/Gerry Barber. Alright Gerry, the last Hump Day Hoedown question: Imagine you woke up tomorrow morning and you were 25 years old again, you’re supposed to now manage a group that is underperforming and are disengaged but you’ve been blessed you get to retain everything that you’ve learned up until today. So, you get up in the morning, you head out to work, what you do now?

 

Gerry Barber:     In a way that happened to me last year. No, I didn’t go back to 25 and wasn’t able to run a fast 40 a yard dash, but it really is that scenario, I was moving into an area of our operations that I didn’t have a lot of subject matter expert for expense management, expense audit card management, if you will for our organization. I was asked to bring my leadership skills to the table to help in this transformation of group, I won’t say that they were disconnected, they were doing good work, didn’t have the right technologies didn’t have the right processes and sorely needed the right leadership.

 

There’s another book that I will share and that’s called ‘The First 90 days. It was a book written by Michael Watkins, it’s a Harvard Press, I believe, but don’t quote me on that. It’s a book I used when I arrived at Deloitte and it’s a book I used again when I took on the responsibilities for the transformation. Basically in that book it helps you understand how you should go about taking on that new responsibility, that new transformation, that new organization that needs to be improved. And in that first 90 days, it’s so crucial to be listening to help people understand who you are to begin to craft an understanding of what is needed and then to rally people around a clear vision to go into the future for that journey that you’re about to take together. You should not make rash judgments and decisions in that 90 days just to appease your boss or some other group who wants to see the transformation done the week after you get in there, you got to resist those type of things. Following the guidance in the First 90 Days book is absolutely a wonderful way to go about tackling the scenario that you talk about. And so, I would encourage anyone who is starting a new job, starting new roll or taking over a transformation of another part of their organization to read that book and let that book guide you through the process.

 

Jim Rembach:   Gerry Barber, it was an honor to spend time with you today please share with Fast Leader listeners how they can connect with you?

 

Gerry Barber:     That’s easy. Again I work with Deloitte, I could be found at GBarber@deloitte.com or you can give me a call at 615-882-7792 be happy to chat with anyone who wants to talk about leadership anytime. 

 

Jim Rembach:     Gerry, thank you for sharing your knowledge and wisdom, the Fast Leader legion honors you and thanks you for helping us get over the hump. Woot Woot!

 

Thank you for joining me on the Fast Leader show today. For recaps, links from every show, special offers and access to download and subscribe, if you haven’t already, head on over the fastleader.net so we can help you move onward and upward faster.

 

END OF AUDIO

 

 

 

leadership-podcast-jesse-jackson-episode

012: Jesse Jackson: I was deeply hurt

Podcast Show Notes with Jesse Jackson

Jesse tells his story of a time when he was terminated and how for the first time in his life he felt so inadequate. After his boss shared the reason with him Jesse knew he needed to make a change. Jesse learned he needed to self-engage at work to stand out above the rest. He learned that his effort was needed to find more fulfillment personally and professionally. Listen to Jesse tell his story of pain, transformation, determination and resilience to help you move onward and upward faster.

Jesse Jackson grew up as a Military Brat and went to 12 different schools during 1st through 8th grade.  One of his earliest memories is going to work with his Grandmother who managed a Post Exchange located in Fort Polk Louisiana.  She would allow him to pick out all the comic books he wanted.

For over 30 years Jesse has worked in a contact center with roles in inbound sales, outbound telemarketing, customer service, technical support, been an agent, a supervisor, manager & a director. He believes that successful contact centers strive for excellent customer service, a culture of constant improvement and a place where you should laugh often.

Jesse lives in Dallas Texas with his lovely bride Linda. They are proof that a mixed marriage can work.  She is currently training for her first Ironman Triathlon while Jesse is at home watching way too much TV and reading way too many comic books.

Jesse loves podcasting and is the host of Next Stop Everywhere: A Doctor Who podcast as well as Storming the Castle, a podcast all about the ABC show Castle.

Tweetable Quotes and Mentions

Listen to Jesse Jackson to get over the hump @FastLeaderShow Click to Tweet

“If you’re dumb surround yourself with smart people.” -Jesse Jackson Click to Tweet

“If you’re smart surround yourself with smart people who disagree with you.” -Jesse Jackson Click to Tweet 

“If mine is the only idea on the table, it’s the best idea.” -Jesse Jackson Click to Tweet 

“Collaboration is the most successful management style.” -Jesse Jackson Click to Tweet 

“Clear the air and then move forward.” -Jesse Jackson Click to Tweet 

“Whatever the hardship, whatever the challenge, figure out what to do and move forward.” -Jesse Jackson Click to Tweet 

“When you can, fight your fight and shoot for the goals you want.” -Jesse Jackson Click to Tweet 

“Sometimes you need to have faith in yourself…and you need to do it.” -Jesse Jackson Click to Tweet 

Hump to Get Over

Jesse was told by his boss that he was going to be terminated. His boss told him that while he was happy to have a job, he was not happy to have this job; and he needed someone that wants this job. Jesse was hurt deeply because it was the first time where he felt he was not good enough. That’s when Jesse realized he needed to change his outlook and behavior to give more and ask others if they need help. He decided to put himself out there through volunteering and taking risks which ultimately has led him to greater career and financial success.

Leadership Epiphany

The teacher’s pet are the leaders in business. They are not brown nosing or sucking up they are saying, “I want to help the company succeed.”

Advice for you

Fight your fight, live your dreams, work on what you believe in.

Holding him back from being an even better leader

Lack of confidence

Best leadership advice ever received

Love what you do and trust your instincts.

Secret to Success

Honesty and willingness to help

Best resources in work or life

Friends and a network to reach out to and to ask, “what would the hero do.”

Recommended Reading

The One Minute Manager

Contacting Jesse

Twitter:  https://twitter.com/JesseJacksonDFW

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jesse.jackson.372

Podcasts:

https://www.facebook.com/StormingTheCastlePC

http://www.southgatemediagroup.com/next-stop-everywhere-the-doctor-who-podcast

Via email: jesee.jackson2 [at] verizon.net

More Resources

54 Emotional Intelligence (EQ) Competencies List: Emotional Intelligence has proven to be the right kind of intelligence to have if you want to move onward and upward faster. Get your free list today.

Show Transcript: 

Click to access edited transcript

012: Jesse Jackson: I was deeply hurt

Intro: Welcome to the Fast Leader Podcast, where we uncover the leadership like hat that help you to experience, break out performance faster and rocket to success. And now here’s your host, customer and employee engagement expert and certified emotional intelligent practitioner, Jim Rembach.

Jim Rembach:   Thanks Kimberly. Okay, Fast Leader legion, I have Jesse Jackson on the show today. This one grew up as a military brat and went to 12 different schools during first grade through eighth grade—that had to be some character building happening right there. One of his earliest memories is going to work with his grandmother who managed a post exchange located in Fort Polk, Louisiana, she would allow him to pick out all the comic books he wanted. For over 30 years Jesse had worked in a contact center with roles in inbound sales, outbound telemarketing, customer service, technical support. 

He’s been an agent supervisor, manager director, and he believes that working in a contact center is really a place where you should have fun and that the focus on excellent customer service is actually driven through people having intrinsic drive and motivation and a reason to be there. He lives in Dallas with his lovely bride Linda and their proof that a mixed marriage can work because she’s training for her first Ironman triathlon, and you know Jesse sitting at home, watching TV and reading his comic books. He’s also a podcaster. He’s the host of Next Stop Everywhere which is a Dr. Who podcast as well as Storming The Castle podcast all about an ABC show named Castle, I’m sure you’ve all heard of, Jesse Jackson are you ready to help us get over the hump?

Jessie Jackson:     I am. I am excited, so proud and honored that you’ve asked me to talk today, so I am ready, let’s do it.

Jim Rembach:   Awesome. I’ve given our listeners a brief introduction, but can you tell us a little bit about what your current passion is so that we can get to know you better?

Jessie Jackson:     Absolutely.  I am a call center guy, I’ve been doing it so long I still say call ·call center not contact center. I love working in the support industry. I love talking to clients and helping resolve issues. I love taking a new agent that’s afraid to be on the phone, comforting them telling them look, ‘This is a harder job to learn then it is to do, you’ll be amazed how easy that first phone call will be” and helping them to grow, find their voice and their place in the organization.  One of the things that I’m most proud about, Jim, is helping the internal turnover people that find role outside of support or in customer service, my previous job, and the joke we use to make is that they were feeder sales and one day that Jesse will shout the world rise up and then all these people that I had sent to all these departments we would rise up and have a friendly coup and we would take over company.

Jim Rembach:     That’s really can happen if you develop…a lot of organizations are really in need of really in need of, I guess you can say the coach and the developer of others,  and so that’s a very, very valuable asset to have and if you can conquer a mole, I’m sure that’ll be gladly accepted. Now, Jesse I know that you’re a very creative person, I had blessing of being able to present alongside you at a recent event, and I really admired your character and your depth and your storytelling. I know that you probably have some good things to share in regards to inspiration for us and we like to focus on quotes on the Fast Leader Show because they do just that they give us inspiration and oftentimes they have some depths to them that gives a whole lot of meaning in a lot of different ways, but is there a quote that stands out for you as a guiding principle that you can share with us?

Jessie Jackson:     Absolutely. A very quick story. I was a Cub Scout leader early in my life, my son is now 26, but when he was in Cub Scouts and it was a [inaudible 4:17] den.  I wasn’t very artistically creative but one of the other Den moms, called Den Leaders now but you think of herself as Den moms said, “Jesse you’re a dad that’s important and understand remember this, good Cub Scout leaders come up with new ideas, great Cub Scout leaders steal from other people. And I’ve decided that’s my management philosophy. In that’s spirit, there was a show Aaron Sorkin did called Sports Night before he did West Wing and one of the lines was, ‘If you are dumb you surround yourself with smart people. If you’re smart surround yourself with smart people who disagree with you, and that is a philosophy that I say often.

I believe that as leaders you want feedback and you want people to tell you when they think you’re on the wrong track or when you perhaps haven’t thought of everything. You know Jim, it is really frustrating at times when someone comes to you and says, “Ah, I saw something that’ll work but they don’t have any other feedback. And if minds, the only idea on the table it’s the best idea, so let’s talk about it, let’s figure out what you aren’t sure about our path, why you think it may not work or why there’s a different path and discuss it.

I think collaboration is the most successful management style. I realize other people have different management styles but I’m most comfortable when you get the team together you tell them here’s the goal I want to go to and then let’s altogether figure how we’re going to get there and then go forward.

Jim Rembach:   And there’s one thing that stands out as you’re telling that story, and thanks for sharing those quotes. There’s several in there but there’s two that stood out, they’re very powerful. But there has to be an element of humility into what you were just saying and oftentimes I see people have the intent saying, ‘Hey, I want to collaborate.” “Hey, I want those things as far as…’tell me the ideas, challenge me” but then they cut people’s legs out from under him. Over a course of time they continue to ask how  can you know these people just aren’t sharing anything with me it’s because they haven’t really created the environment they don’t have that humility associated with it. How have you been able to overcome that?

Jessie Jackson:     I had been on the receiving—when I started with my current position at Real Page the guy who hired me, I’ve been there about a year and we had our first annual review,  and he had given me feedback that he thought I was too timid that it took me almost nine months and he says, “I can actually see the moment when you said in a meeting, ‘well, I guess I’m not the new guy anymore’ and he says, “I saw you turn a corner” and I said, “Dave, my first three weeks here I bought doughnuts for the team that was less than $20 bucks and you asked me why I was doing it” and said “Well, you know, you should talk to me beforehand.” And there was a time when I said that a server was down and your listeners are not seeing the [8:02] and I got yelled at that we never say the word down, that it had a problem. I said so very quickly. You told me both in action and in words, ‘Don’t take too much responsibility. Don’t step outside your kazone, this is my room and you’re just living in it. It was the most healthy discussion I think I’ve ever had with a leader because it got a little tense, Jim, both of us raised our voices it was a lot of give-and-take and at the end we both felt better and since then we were in sync till he ended up getting promoted for the next year and half, and we always talk about that’s really how it should work. You should be able to talk to your leader or talk to your employee, your teammate, clear the air and then move forward. 

So, I think what helped me is, I know right out of college I had a horrible boss, his name is Joe I will not get the last name. I work as dispatcher. I work 12 hour a day and I could not leave the office unless someone was there to cover me. So, he would go off and I would not have any lunch, I would not have break and he was just a horrible, smart aleck and demeaning and I kept saying, “If I’m ever a boss, I don’t want to be this kind of guy.” And it’s a cliché, if you’re going to talk, talk yet you had to walk to walk. If you say I want to hear your input you have to realize sometimes the input may’ve hurt your ego, you got to put it aside for the good of the organization. 

Jim Rembach:    That almost seems beyond that. The reason I say that is because you talked about having that conversation with your boss, what happened to him? He got promoted. He moved onto something bigger, and not necessarily better, but he moved on to something bigger, right? There’s growth and opportunity for growth within that. I think that’s a great story, thanks for sharing that.

Now, that was a hump that we talked about that you had to get over with that particular boss, I know you have another hump that he had to get over that you’re going to share with us because that was a really defining moment for you that essentially got you to the position to  where you are today. Can you please share us that story and what happened? 

Jessie Jackson:     I absolutely will. Once we settled in Lake Charles, Louisiana, I had lived there and it was a heavy petrochemical environment everything was based on the plants. The economy was really bad in the early 80s’ so I went through a lot of different jobs. We ended up moving to Dallas in 1986, and I was working for a company, and one day Mike Whitaker came in to me and asked me to go in his office and he said, “Jesse, we’re going to release you. We’re going to layoff.” And I went, Wow, and I kind of, back and forth. As we started talking he said, “I wasn’t going to tell you all these but I think we should, you’re happy to have a job but you’re not happy to have this job.” And it really struck me to my chord, Jim, because it was the first time I’ve ever been told, ‘you’re not good enough, you’re not giving the passion that we want.’ And the story I tell a lot is, when you’re kid you mock the teacher’s pet, the person that says, ‘hey can we have extra credit or you didn’t give us our homework or your follow up, but in business those are the people that leaders. The people that sit there and say, ‘Hey, I have some extra time, what can I do? What can I do to help you?” That isn’t someone who is ‘brown nosing’ or ‘sucking up’ or whatever cliché you want to give. If someone was saying, ‘I want to be here and I want to help the company succeed.’

Roger Shiloh is a manager that I partnered with. He was working at contact center. He tells every new person, and I told my son this when he learned the contact center and I tell in new class, “To be successful contact center, no matter what the dress code is, wear khaki pants and a polo shirt every day. It doesn’t matter if it’s okay to be jeans too, be early never be late. Three, volunteer for any extra assignment or any overtime that’s available. If you do those three things, you are above everyone else in the contact center. I think that’s a lot to say for that. 

Jim Rembach:    That goes beyond a contact center. I think those are good principles to follow regardless of where you are, regardless of what position you’re in. You are perceived differently when you aren’t essentially stepping in, I don’t want to say step up because that’s a different context from my perspective, but you got step in. You’ve got to put that right foot in. You’ve got to put it out, you got to shake it all about, right?

Jessie Jackson:     Absolutely. The job after I was laid off, I was selling substandard car insurance over the people, people who had DWI and a lot of speeding tickets were our customer base. I worked there for couple years dedicated anything I can do, they laid me off. Instead of saying, “Gosh, this new philosophy didn’t work” I just said, “Nope, I’m going to plug it in.” So, I started with a company called BancTec and in 1989 I had a 2-month-old baby. I started working and I stayed there till 2005 when I was director and they decided to outsource the company and I worked myself out of the job for a year. 

I believe that putting yourself out there volunteering, sharing, taking risks ultimately will lead you to success, if not financial and career success, personal success.

Jim Rembach:     And also there has to be an element of perseverance associated with that. As you were telling your story those transitions that took place, you always keep your chin up, you always kept looking forward. Where does that come from? 

Jessie Jackson:     My wife says it’s because my family tends to be a pretty negative group. And my immediate family, cousins, aunts, uncles, and she and my mother-in-law said it was in spite of my family’s little literary humor, I have just been blessed, Jim, with accepting the fact that what things are and then where we go next. I talk about my wife a lot because we’ve been married over 30 years and we’ve got a lot of experience. She shared with me that our first three or four years in marriage’s she thought I was just too bullish to be worried. She’s like, ‘He just doesn’t have enough sense to be worried.’ And then she realized, no it’s just that’s just his nature. 

Whatever the plan, whatever the hardship, whatever they challenged I’m going to look try to figure out what to do and move forward. She says when I’m worried, she really gets worried it’s like, “Okay, if Jesse doesn’t know what to do, holy molly, we’re in trouble.”

Jim Rembach:      That’s a vote of confidence right there, I tell you. Thanks for sharing all that that you’ve shared with us. If you were to—based on all that you have shared—if there was one piece of advice you’d give to the Fast Leader legion, what would it be? 

Jessie Jackson:     I’ll try to keep this short, because I know I tend to talk a lot. I been thinking about this a lot lately, the wonderful singer-songwriter Harry Chapin in an interview once said that there is good tired and had tired. Bad tired is at the end of the day and you may have won you may have accomplish your goals but you were fighting someone else’s fight, you were living someone else’s dream, you are working on someone else’s goals, and even though you won you’re tired and you’re depressed. But good tired, maybe a day where you failed, maybe you didn’t reach your goal but you were fighting your fight, you were living your dreams, you were working on what you believed in. And I think you can’t always choose but when you can, fight your fight. Fight the things you believe in. Shift for the goals you want and go for what you think is going to make your company successful, you successful, your family successful. And I think that if you have that core knowledge, if you know what you want to be when you grow up, I think that helps.

Jim Rembach:     That’s great advice. That is absolutely information that will help our Fast Leader listeners move onward and upward faster. Okay, now, I know your current business and you have a lot of things going on we’ve kind of mention that before, but it was one thing that really excites you about your work that you’re doing today?

Jessie Jackson:     As you know, I am in a transition, I will be looking for a new role soon and I think that’s what exciting me, what’s next in my career? What is going to be the next journey I’m going to take? I believe that with my knowledge and my passion that there is something good coming up where I can take all my knowledge and my experience and help another team grow. The thing that I find, and I talked about this before even in this podcast, one of things that I find most satisfying is taking employee that other people said, “Ah, they’re mediocre best” I don’t know if they have the skill set, but finding their talent and finding the company’s needs matching them, there’s just nothing better than that. 

Jim Rembach:    I can appreciate that. The entire Fast Leader legion wishes you the very best, Jesse. Alright, here we go Fast Leader listeners, it’s time for the—Hump Day Hoedown. Okay, Jesse, the Hump Day Hoedown is the part of our show where you give us good insights fast. I’, going to ask you several questions and your job is to give robust, yet rapid responses that are going to help us move onward and upward faster.  Jesse, are you ready to hoedown? 

Jessie Jackson:     I am ready to hoedown

Jim Rembach:   Okay. What do you think is holding you back from being an even better leader today?

Jessie Jackson:     Sometimes lack of confidence. You know in your mind what you should do but in your heart you have doubts and fears and you’re afraid to take that risk, and I think that’s me. 

Jim Rembach:     What is the best leadership advice you have ever received?

Jessie Jackson:     Love what you do and trust your instincts. 

Jim Rembach:     What is one of your secrets that you believe contributes to your success?

Jessie Jackson:     My honesty and my willingness to help. I believe in—you do a lot of favors, you correct favors, and then therefore when you need something they’re there to help you. 

Jim Rembach:     What do you feel is one of your best resources that helps you lead in business or life?

Jessie Jackson:     Two things: Friends and network of people you can reach out to, to say “Hey, I’m worried about it or I need some advice.” Two, I read a lot of comic books and science fiction and I always think what would the hero do? What’s the right thing to do?

Jim Rembach:     What will be one book that you would recommend for our listeners?

Jessie Jackson:     It’s a standby but the ‘One Minute Manager’ I go back to fairly often. Just the idea of that sandwich talk about the action not the person ending with a positive thing, I remember that a lot because no one wants to feel personally bad. There’s a  saying, you hate the sin love the sinner, and so I think in a secular terms, you’re unhappy with the action but you are a fan of the employee. 

Jim Rembach:     Thanks for sharing. Alright, Fast Leader listeners you can find links to that and other bonus information from today’s show by going to the show notes page and you’ll find that on fastleader.net/Jesse Jackson. Okay, Jesse here’s the last question for the Hump Day Hoedown: Imagine you woke up tomorrow morning and you were 25 years old again and you are supposed to begin a new job as a manager of a team of people that is underperforming and disengaged. But you’re very blessed because you’ve got to take everything that you’ve learned with you. Now, your task is to take the team around. You get up, you get ready and you head out to work, what do you do now?

Jessie Jackson:     That is a great question. I would listen but I would not be afraid to make changes sooner. When I did this and when I started with this with the current company in 2005, I got a lot of feedback, ‘Oh, no, that will not work here.’ And I was reluctant to ‘break too many eggs’ to try to push the boundary and I’ve said if I had to do it over again I would have pushed a little bit harder, a little bit sooner. Understand their feedback, incorporate it but not be afraid to make the changes. I think that goes back to my core concern. Sometimes you need to have faith in yourself and say, I know what needs to be done and you need to do it.

Jim Rembach:     Alright, Jesse, it was an honor to spend time with you today. Can you please share with Fast Leader listeners how they can connect with you?

Jessie Jackson:     Absolutely. I am at jwj170104 on Twitter. I am on Facebook, Jesse Jackson in Lewisville, Texas if you want to reach that. As you were nice enough, if you want to hear my podcast on a less serious note but we have a lot of fun, I did a couple of podcast Next Stop Everywhere about Doctor Who, Storm in a Castle is about the ABC’s show Castle. I talked about Game of Thrones a little bit and a little bit of everything, so I do a lot of fun. I can be reached jesse.ackson2@verizon.net, so if they want to send me an e-mail. I’m on LinkedIn and all the other social networks.

Jim Rembach:     Jesse Jackson, thank you for sharing your knowledge and wisdom, the Fast Leader Legion of honors you and thanks you for helping us get over the hump. Woot Woot!

Thank you for joining me on the Fast Leader Show today. For recaps, links from every show, special offers and access to download and subscribe, if you haven’t already, head on over to the fastleader.net, so that we can help you move onward and upward faster. 

 

END OF AUDIO

 

 

Honoree Corder on the @FastLeaderShow

011: Honoree Corder: You need to speak

Podcast Show Notes with Honoree Corder

Honoree shares her story about something so many find terrifying. While taking a public speaking class her instructor told her, “You need to speak.” Honoree found herself finally realizing what the meaning of her words were several years later when after a speaking opportunity an attendee came up to her and thanked her for her words. Then she realized there is an opportunity to speak words into people and that they may not live into for years to come. It’s a power that can bring hope and requires a lot of care.

Honoree Corder was raised on a farm in near Salem Center, Ohio and in Albuquerque, New Mexico by traditionally educated yet very entrepreneurial parents. She was also a foster kid and children’s home resident, attending four high schools and becoming very good at meeting new people, adapting to new environments and learning to be extremely flexible. While she didn’t attend college, she overcame her childhood challenges and became a successful entrepreneur by becoming a voracious reader and student of human behavior with an unstoppable positive attitude.

After several years in the corporate world she decided to transition to pursuing her passion of helping others realize their greatest potential. As a coach, she empowers business professionals and entrepreneurs to go from “disorganized and frustrated” to “focused and profitable” by breaking through the time-money wall and creating the business that supports their ideal life.

Honoree is the author of 15 books, including Vision to Reality, The Successful Single Mom book series, If Divorce is a Game, These are the Rules, and her most recent Business Dating: Applying Relationship Rules in Business for Ultimate Success.

She spends every moment of her free time with her amazing family, reading, learning languages, and squeezing the juice out of life.

Tweetable Quotes and Mentions

Check out @Honoree getting over the hump on the @FastLeaderShow Click to Tweet

“Everyone is born with the seeds of greatness within them.” -Honoree Corder Click to Tweet

“Some people buy into the fact that they can be great, and they are.” -Honoree Corder Click to Tweet

“Most of the time people are not their behavior.” -Honoree Corder Click to Tweet

“What someone does for a living is not who they are, it’s what they do.” -Honoree Corder Click to Tweet

“A lot of people put stock in I am this, as opposed to I do this.” -Honoree Corder Click to Tweet

“We live in a time when there is a new great book every minute.” -Honoree Corder Click to Tweet

“We all have the opportunity to speak words into people.” -Honoree Corder Click to Tweet

“The only limitations you have are the ones that you hold on to.” -Honoree Corder Click to Tweet

“I want to speak words of life, possibility and hope into people.” -Honoree Corder Click to Tweet

“Playing small doesn’t serve the world.” -Honoree Corder Click to Tweet

“Not owning your greatness doesn’t serve the world.” -Honoree Corder Click to Tweet

“If there’s something you’ve heard over and over again, listen to that.” -Honoree Corder Click to Tweet

Hump to Get Over

Honoree shares her story about the limiting beliefs that keeps us all from realizing our dreams and potential. She believes you are capable of anything you put your mind to and the limits you place upon yourself and that you hold on to are place in your own mind and you have the power to remove them.

Leadership Epiphany

There is an opportunity we all have to speak words into people and we need to be careful with it.

Advice for you

There is a reoccurring message in your life that is meant to get to you. The sooner you listen and take action the better for you.

Holding her back from being an even better leader

Limiting beliefs

Best leadership advice ever received

Being a leader of self is the best way to be a leader of others.

Secret to Success

Extreme self-care

Best resources in work or life

My network

Recommended Reading

Mindset: The New Psychology of Success
The Miracle Morning: The Not-So-Obvious Secret Guaranteed to Transform Your Life (Before 8AM)
Think and Grow Rich: The Landmark Bestseller – Now Revised and Updated for the 21st Century
The Law of Success In Sixteen Lessons by Napoleon Hill

Gifts from Honoree

  • Two free chapters from Vision to Reality: How Short Term Massive Action Equals Long Term Maximum Results
  • Copy of: Tall Order! 7 Master Strategies to Organize Your Life and Double Your Success in Half the Time
    Both available for download

Contacting Honoree

Website: www.honoreecorder.com

Twitter: https://twitter.com/Honoree

More Resources

Self-confidence formula from Napoleon Hill

 

Show Transcript: 

Click to access edited transcript

011: Honoree Corder: You need to speak

Intro: Welcome to the Fast Leader Podcast, where we explore convenient yet effective shortcuts that will help you get ahead and move forward faster by becoming a better leader. And now here’s your host, customer and employee engagement expert and certified emotional intelligent practitioner, Jim Rembach.

Jim Rembach:     Thanks Kimberly. Alright Fast Leader legion, the person who I have on our show today is somebody has overcome a lot of obstacles in life and did not allow that to stop her from being the person that she is today and impacting so many others. Her name is Honoree Corder that has a French origin to it. It’s spelled like Honoree, however it’s Honoray so we want to make sure that we get that right for her when you reference her and tell other people about this awesome show that you’re getting ready to participate in today.

 

Honoree was on a farm near Salem Center, Ohio and in Albuquerque, New Mexico by traditionally educated yet very entrepreneurial parents. She was a foster kid and child home resident and attended four high schools which helped her become very good at meeting new people, adapting to new environments and learning to be extremely flexible. While she didn’t attend college she overcame her childhood challenges and became a successful entrepreneur by becoming a voracious reader and student of human behavior with an unstoppable positive attitude. Honoree has gone on to write several books and be a coach and inspiration to many. Honoree Corder, are you ready to help us get over the hump?

 

Honoree Corder:     You bet, absolutely.

 

Jim Rembach:      Fantastic. Now, I’ve given our listeners a brief introduction about you, but can you please tell us, what is your current passion so that we can get to know you better?

 

Honoree Corder:     Great.  My current passion is helping people to have a complete transformation and live the life that they thought was only possible but is actually really possible. 

 

Jim Rembach:     What does that really mean? A lot of times we look to others to have us—idea of what that would be for us and we often spend really a lifetime searching. So, what does that mean?

 

Honoree Corder:     My work with people is—as an executive and business coach, but that is not entirely accurate everyone wants a title, right? What I do is—my tagline is: “I double your income and triple your time off.” But actually, what I wanted to do is get my get grabby mitts on people and help them to see themselves as I see them with all of the potential and all the promise that their life holds. So I help them to make the most out of their business, I help them to make the most of their thought processes, out of their  physical body, their emotional intelligence all of those things. I work with people from sea level to 30,000 feet.

 

Jim Rembach:     As I listen to you talk there was a comment that I read by somebody who was an author of a leadership book. And he was referring to how certain responses are given or provided by others, the way that they behave, he was talking about a large number of people, and he said, some people are just so stupid. And I’m like, “Really, this came from an author of a leadership book”? So, you mentioned something about you seeing that in other people, is that something that can be seen and found in a lot of people or is it really just a small subset?

 

Honoree Corder:      I think everyone is born with the seeds of greatness within them. I think there’s one partner turn in one part nature and I think some people buy into the fact that they can be great and amazing and terrific and so they are. Some people buy into the message from whoever they get it from whether it’s their parents or their friends or their teachers that are not all that smart, they’re not all that capable and they live in to that and that breaks my heart. 

 

Jim Rembach:     You know, kind of funny having three smaller kids, I have a middle schooler and two elementary so it’s 11,9, & 6 talking about this—what we do as adults and molding what they think about themselves. First of all, we know that from a personality perspective, people are wired a certain way and then we accentuate that and sometimes not in the best ways.  And there is a fascinating book that I read many years ago and it has guided me in a lot of ways, it’s a book called Mindset by Dr. Carol Dweck. 

 

She talks about many of the things that you just mentioned. For example, and it’s so commonplace but we see that we do it often like you never should tell a child, ‘you’re smart’. Because what’s the opposite of that? So, if you’re not smart then that means you’re dumb. So, what we should talk to them about is the effort that they put it. We should talk to them about the details of their work and how you appreciate the fact that they really focused in on this and did a great job on that. And then that ultimately will result in you having greater knowledge, and things like that, and that will what makes you smart. But telling somebody directly—you’re smart—it may seem like a compliment but it’s the opposite that is really a bad thing.

 

Honoree Corder:     Interesting. I think that there’s the behavior in there as a person. Most of the times people are not their behavior. So, when I’m educating my daughter on behavior, I will say, “I love you and you’re wonderful and amazing just as you are.” The choice that you made, I’m not exactly excited about that choice that you made, but that doesn’t define who you are. Just as what someone does for a living is not who they are, that’s what they do, but a lot of people put stock in, “I am this as opposed to I do this.”

 

Jim Rembach:     That’s fantastic. I appreciate the dialogue that we’ve had there’s so much insight and we can probably make this in our show but we got a move forward. On the Fast Leader show we always talk about inspiration and things that can give us a reminding and a grounding rod, we talk a lot about leadership quotes. Is there a quote or two or maybe even a passage that stands out for you as something that always reminds you, to say, reset yourself or change your mindset so that you can move forward, can you share that with us, please?

 

Honoree Corder:     Sure. I’m a huge fan of Napoleon Hill and in both of my favorite books, [Laugh] that he has written, “Think and Grow Rich and the Law of Success,” he has something called the self- confidence formula. And  20 something years ago, when I read, Thinking Grow Rich for the first time, I memorize, at his suggestion, the self-confidence formula and said it over and over and over again. It is something that I’m including in a new book that I’m writing, I’m referencing that material because I think it’s so important for people to know that it’s there. 

 

It’s interesting because we live in a time where there’s a new great book available every minute. As I was telling someone yesterday, they’re the self-help classics, they’re the foundations to all of the work that all of us who write books refer to and defer to in our work and that book “Think and Grow Rich” and it’s also in the Law of Success as well that self-confidence formula those words that you’re saying to yourself, if not the passage it’s the idea that I can reset, I can go back and reference that and push the reset button and start back from that place of power, that’s my recommendation. 

 

Jim Rembach:    Was the passage in their as you we’re explaining to it? 

 

Honoree Corder:     It’s the self-confidence formula. I have the talent and skills and abilities to create anything that I desire but I have to be committed, I have to take the action is the gist of it, it’s a multi-paragraph formula, that whole entire passage is—I don’t know if you’ve seen it, it’s like five or six paragraphs that you commit to memory and then repeat aloud once a day until you embody that, and that’s the passage that I refer to.

 

Jim Rembach:     That’s perfect. What we can do is we can put that on our show notes page for those who have not had the opportunity to review that. And that show notes page are going to be at fastleader.net/Honoree Corder. So, we talked a little bit about mindset in overcoming a lot of obstacles in life and we talked about epiphanies and few other people say Aha’s, is there a moment in your life when you’ve had an epiphany or maybe something that occurred that later you had an epiphany about that has guided you as a person, to be the person you are and positively impact so many that you’ve impacted so far and are yet to impact, can you please share that story with us?

 

Honoree Corder:     Absolutely. I took a public speaking class in 1997 and my instructor was teaching us through a four week evening class, she was a friend of mine and profane 1995 cell glycolic out and start their life teaching after a four-week evening class—she was a friend of mine, she’s was a presentation coach—and she invited me to take her class and I took the class she would have us get out and give this presentations and then give us feedback. One of the things she said to me was’” Honoree you need to speak, if you don’t speak people are missing out. And I heard it but I didn’t hear. It wasn’t until years when I was asked to begin speaking and I started speaking more and more. People would say, “I really appreciated the thing you said about” or “I hear your voice in my head telling me I can do something when I didn’t think that I can do it.” My own voice in my head is telling me that I can do that and I realize that’s exactly the gift that she gave to me. So there’s something very powerful, the epiphany for me is that there is this opportunity that we all have to speak words to people and that you have to be very careful about what you say. You have to speak words, like I have to say to my daughter, “It’s what you did it’s not who you are.” And I tell my clients and my readers and people that I come into contact with that you are capable of anything you put your mind, here you have no limitations the only limitations you have are the ones that you hold on to and that you make up in your mind, that was my epiphany. Those words the people speak in to us, we may not even live in to that till years and years later. So things that I am saying now may no come to fruition until much later but I am so intentional and purposeful in what I say because I want to speak words of life and possibility and hope into people. 

 

Jim Rembach:    First of all, thank you for sharing that. You mentioned something about, it’s taking time for you to realize what you she was telling you. Sometimes it can take a lifetime for us to finally click, for some of us, at least me I should say—but if you we’re to  give a piece of advice to the Fast Leader legion about that particular story, what would you tell them about, not listening but really “listening”?

 

Honoree Corder:     I think we get, and I have this deal with God, if you send me the feather, send me the feather again.” I think the message is come repeated messages that were supposed to get. At first they come quietly so it’s the feather, the brick the book and then the mock truck. [Laugh] So my request is: “Could you send the feather a few times so that I hear the message.” But I think that there’s something that to each person that’s listening there’s a recurring theme in your life, there’s a recurring message that is meant to get to you. And the sooner you listen then the sooner you get the message. The sooner you get action on it the better for you. Because playing small doesn’t serve the world not owning your greatness doesn’t serve the world, it doesn’t serve you, so that’s my advice. If there’s a recurring there, if there’s something you’ve heard over and over again, listen to that. The first person that said to me, “Your voice in my head telling me I can do it, I’ve chosen to listen to that and make it louder than the voice in my head telling me that I can’t do it.” And that was the moment where I recognize that I was able to speak words of possibility and help in encouragement into people and it was my job to do that. But it took me a long time to own that and to do it even though I started hearing that message in my early 20’s. It took me a long time to own that so we all have these messages that come us hear them sooner, that’s my advice. 

 

Jim Rembach:      There’s another keyword that you she said in there that I often repeat back to a lot of folks because here in the Fast Leader show we’re talking about redefining what leadership is, the fact is that, we all have to lead. If we don’t do a good job of leading ourselves there is no way possible in this world that we’ll be able to lead others. We’ll be even looked at to be someone who can lead others. I think for me, I’ve often looked at certain folks and say:” You know what, I would love to be on their team because I want to be on the team for that person so that they can lead me.” Ownership is a really critical part of our day-to-day life. And many of us just squander through. And many times, for me, through certain days, certain times of the day, certain weeks of the month, I don’t necessarily own things, right? And so I need to do better job of hunkering down, as they say and owning things more, thank you for that piece of advice. 

If you could, tell us a little bit about the current work that you’re doing, you mentioned about writing a book, what really excites you and gives you energy because you’ve given us broad scope of helping others, but what specifically is the thing that charges you?

 

Honoree Corder:     There are two things. One is when I’m working one-on-one with someone and they tell me that they have become a new person through our work together, that is just the coolest thing ever. And so maybe you want me to expand on that a little bit. What I do is speak words into people, give them permission to do the things that they want to do. It’s everything from the very simple—if you want to do business with someone, ask them. If you want to write a state plan, or you want to handle their legal matters, their M&A transactions, pick up the phone and say, “This is my area of genius, I am awesome at this, I would love to serve you in this way,” take ownership of your greatness in that way. In my work with people that is my focus, helping them to figure out the thing that gives them the juice and help them to do more of that. 

 

The other thing that happens now, every single day, which is super cool because it’s kind of my—I was listening to a podcast yesterday and someone said, ‘Reading books for you is like giving a heroin addict a pound of heroin.” And I thought, “Oh! That’s so me, I’m such a nerd for that. But because I have read in several books, I now get a message every single day from a reader who said, ‘I found your book just in the nick of time and it change the trajectory of my life.” I think that was so amazing and humbling, that the words that I write in isolation and I have this avatar of this person that I want to read my words and to feel better about their life and about their future, that is coming back to me through Facebook messages and e-mails. I got one in the mail yesterday, like someone actually sent me a letter with a stamp on it, and I was said, “Really, that’s awesome, I love that.

 

Jim Rembach:      That’s definitely going the extra mile to give you feedback these days.

 

Honoree Corder:     Absolutely.

 

Jim Rembach:     What goals do you have for the future? 

 

Honoree Corder:     Oh! Gosh. I have a few books to write this year on my-to-do list. My family—are goal is to go mobile by the middle of year next year. So, we’re going to be living mobile, travelling around, staying in different places and not having an actual home but being homeless on purpose, being virtual, so we’re working for that. 

 

Jim Rembach:     We might have to do a follow up show on that, that’s amazing thought. For me, I think we’d have to have 15 garage sales before we even…

 

Honoree Corder:     Actually, we have had the first several phases of that process, the process of going from the big house to the little place to live. And then looking through everything and saying, ‘Do I really need this thing that I held on to? It’s like, ‘Someone gave me this beautiful Waterford Crystal, actually they were Tiffany candle holders years ago, and I never put candles on then because they were from Tiffany’s I don’t want to get smut on them. I never light any candles in them, I just dusted them and carry them around— and them we’re heavy because they’re from Tiffany. And so I finally just said, ‘This need a new home, someone else needs to dust this and someone else who has a little less—whatever—anxiety about getting some soot on a candle. [Laugh] But we’ve gone through the layers of it and now everything we do is, ‘What is it that we need to do in order to live this life of abundance and travel and just running around and being free in finding all of that. 

 

Jim Rembach:     That’s awesome.  Hopefully somebody will buy those Tiffany candles and put them in their storage facility. [Laugh] Alright, the entire Fast Leader legion wishes you the very best on everything that you’re targeting for your future. Alright, gang, now it’s time to move on to the rapid pace part of our show and that’s the—Hump Day Hoedown. Alright, Fast Leader listeners this is the time where we ask Honoree several questions and she gives us fast answers so that we can move onward and upward faster. Honoree are you ready to hoedown?

 

Honoree Corder:     I’m ready, fast, quickly. 

 

Jim Rembach:   Spoken like a Texan, alright. What do you think is holding you back from being an even better leader today? 

 

Honoree Corder:     Limiting beliefs with everybody. I’m the same as everybody else, I have limiting beliefs and I’m working on getting rid of those and expanding my consciousness every single day. 

 

Jim Rembach:     What’s the best leadership advice you have every received?

 

Honoree Corder:     That being a leader of self is the best way to be a leader of others. 

 

Jim Rembach:     What is one of your secrets that you believe contributes to your success?

 

Honoree Corder:     Extreme self-care.

 

Jim Rembach:     We may have to elaborate that on another show. What do you feel is one of your best resources that helps you lead in business or life?

 

Honoree Corder:     My network. I have a really great group of people that I rely on to help me to work through ideas and strategies and challenges and that’s your peer group, your relationships or the people that you rely on when you need move forward or get unstuck or whatever. 

 

Jim Rembach:     That sounds like a Napoleon Hill influence at well. What would be one book that you would recommend to our listeners? Other than your own.

 

Honoree Corder:     Oh! Gosh. I listen to your other podcasts and I thought to myself, and each time, how can you recommend only one book. So, I’m going to go with ‘The Miracle Morning”. Because I already mentioned my other two favorites. The Miracle Morning by Hal Elrod, life changer—I don’t know if you of that book or you know about Hal but that is a favorite book. And then, I’m just going to say that on my website I have my favorite books. So, if you want to know the rest of them, they’re not even all on there but it’s a good start. 

 

Jim Rembach:     Alright, Fast Leader listeners, you can find links to that book and many others again on our show notes page and that’s going to be at fastleader.net/Honoree Corder. And Honoree you even have a special gift for our listeners, don’t you? Tell us a little bit about that.

 

Honoree Corder:     I have not one but two gifts, cause that’s how I roll.  

 

Jim Rembach:     Awesome. 

 

Honoree Corder:      So, if you go to honoreecorder/podcast you can get a free copy of my first book that went to get croissant and antiviral they’ll actually go to and honor rate quarter/pod cast eating that are actually/podcast you can actually get a free copy of my first book, Tall Order. And you can also get two free chapters of my book Vision to Reality. 

 

Jim Rembach:     Fantastic. We appreciate those gifts and we look forward to reading those and more coming from you in the future. So, now to last question of the Hump Day Hoedown: Imagine you  woke up tomorrow morning and you were 25 years old all over again but you are blessed you have the opportunity to keep everything that you know today with you. You are given the responsibility to manage a team that’s underperforming and disengage. Your job is to turn these folks around. Now, you get up in the morning you realize what happened you head out to work, what do you do now?

 

 Honoree Corder:     First of all, I’m a little offended that you don’t think that I’m 25, but we’ll just going to skip right over that. [Laugh] I am going to find out each of my teams ‘whys’. Why are they coming to work? What did they want most in the world? And if where they need to be is on that team and moving forward, I’m going to help them to live into their potential and take ownership of their greatness and come up with a plan and a vision and move themselves forward. And if they don’t need to be there, then I’m going to help them find their right path and have a transformation because that’s what I do. 

 

Jim Rembach:     That’s awesome. Honoree, it was an honor to spend time with you today, please share with the Fast Leader legion how that they can connect with you?

 

Honoree Corder:     honoreecorder.com. 

 

Jim Rembach:     Perfect. Honoree, thank you for sharing your knowledge and wisdom the Fast Leader legion honors you and thanks you for helping us get over the hump. Woot, Woot!

 

Thank you for joining me on the Fast Leader show today. For recaps, links from every show, special offers and access to download and surprise, if you haven’t already, head on over to the fastleader.net so we can help you move onward and upward faster. 

 

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