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020: Karl Sharicz: Perseverance can pay off

Karl Sharicz Show Notes

Karl was told no. But he didn’t stop there. He was a new training director for a company but he didn’t have any education in the art and science of adult education. Not wanting to wing it, he found Boston University offered a master’s degree that only took nine months to complete. Karl asked his organization to allow him the time off to go to classes and to pay for the program. He was told no. Not stopping there, Karl eventually got his organization to agree to the time off and pay for the program in a creative and collaborative way. Listen to this episode to learn how Karl’s story can help you move onward and upward faster.

Karl Sharicz was born in Somerville, Massachusetts (just outside of Boston) but he lost his Boston accent as a result of being in the United States Air Force. When Karl was three, his parents moved from the city to the suburbs and he lived near a small farm. He instantly fell in love with the farming life and worked there from age 10 to 15. On the farm, he fed cows, cared for horses and collected eggs from angry chickens who pecked my hands for stealing their future chicks from under them. He also became steeped in the art of shoveling pig manure into a spreader during corn season.

Karl was attracted to music at an early age. Just about everyone in my family played an instrument from his grandparents on down. Music was all around him. His family wanted him to become a classical pianist but his rebellious nature led him to the guitar sounds of the Ventures, Chet Atkins, Link Wray, Dick Dale, and Duane Eddy.

Vietnam was raging by 1968 and Karl was drafted into the military. While some of his friends sought shelter in the university or ran off to Canada, he wasn’t ready for either of those and so he took his draft notice to the Air Force Recruiter and said “Sir, can you help me with this?” and he said “sure” and that was the last he ever saw of his draft notice. Karl served for four years.

After serving his country, he went to work in a chemistry lab. During the interview he could recite the periodic table of the elements so they hired him on the spot. Listening carefully to that science teacher in high school really paid off.

Working in a laboratory got Karl even more interested science and so he went for other lab work and studied chemistry at night. Over eight short years of intense study he graduated cum laude from Suffolk University with a Chemistry Degree in 1982. All was fine in the lab for several years until he discovered he liked dealing with customers more than molecules and atoms. So out of the lab and into the world of marketing, robotics, and training & development he went. That led him to going for a Master’s Degree in Adult Education.

Karl’s education degree served him well and in 1997 he joined a company called Simplex Time Recorder Company and went immediately on the road as a traveling instructor. He spent several years inside developing a training curriculum for a group of certified professional customer service experts. In 2001, Simplex Time Recorder was sold to Tyco, merged with Grinnell, and that became Tyco SimplexGrinnell.

After 17 years there, the last 11 in the customer experience discipline, Karl now is the Founder of his own consulting practice called CX Partners.

Tweetable Quotes and Mentions

Listen and @ksharicz will help you get over the hump on @FastLeaderShow Click to Tweet

“Give everybody a little bit of attention every now and then.” Karl Sharicz Click to Tweet

“Live the legacy you want to leave.” John Maxwell by Karl Sharicz Click to Tweet

“You need to demonstrate in actions what you believe.” Karl Sharicz Click to Tweet

“Teams can come up with more creative solutions than you can as an individual.” Karl Sharicz Click to Tweet

“Don’t give up and don’t try to go it alone.” Karl Sharicz Click to Tweet

“Everything has a solution.” Karl Sharicz Click to Tweet

“You’ll drive yourself crazy trying to think through it all on your own.” Karl Sharicz Click to Tweet

“Every day we’re faced with a problem we need to solve.” Karl Sharicz Click to Tweet

“It’s a lonely process if you try to do it on your own.” Karl Sharicz Click to Tweet

“Whatever holds you back is self-imposed.” Karl Sharicz Click to Tweet

“If you’re not trying and failing, you’re not learning.” Karl Sharicz Click to Tweet 

“You have to be willing to roll up your sleeves and get into the action.” Karl Sharicz Click to Tweet 

“When they see that you care they’re willing to be part of the team solution.” Karl Sharicz Click to Tweet

“Motivation fails when problems don’t have that obvious solution.” Karl Sharicz Click to Tweet

“If people are disengaged that means their voice isn’t being heard.” Karl Sharicz Click to Tweet

Hump to Get Over

Karl was a new training director for a company but he didn’t have any education in the art and science of adult education. He found Boston University offered a master’s degree that only took nine months to complete. Karl asked his organization for the time off and to pay for the program. He was told no. Karl didn’t stop there and ultimately they agreed to the time off and paid for the program. Listen to this episode to learn about the creative and collaborative way Karl got over the hump.

Advice for others

Don’t give up and try to go it alone. There’s a way to just about everything. Everything has a solution.

Holding him back from being an even better leader

Not a damn thing.

Best Leadership Advice Received

Being honest with yourself and integrity goes a long way.

Secret to Success

Getting down in the trenches with people I am leading.

Best Resources in business or Life

Reading lots of books.

Recommended Reading

Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us

Contacting Karl

Email: karl [at] cxpartners.us
Twitter: https://twitter.com/ksharicz
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/karlsharicz
CX Partners: http://www.cxpartners.us/

More Resources

Interview with co-founder of Synectics George M. Prince

Show Transcript: 

Click to access edited transcript

020: Karl Sharicz: Perseverance can pay off

 

Intro: Welcome to the Fast Leader Podcast, where we uncover the leadership like hat that help you to experience, break out performance faster and rocket to success. And now here’s your host, customer and employee engagement expert and certified emotional intelligent practitioner, Jim Rembach.

Jim Rembach:   Thanks Kimberly. Okay Fast Leader legion, I have the opportunity to share with you somebody who I admire in a lot of different ways. He is multitalented and also has a sense of humour that just seems to be never ending, it comes out like, ‘that’s pretty darn witty.’ And it’s not everything that he may have said before, his name is Karl Sharicz.  

Karl is a native of Summerfield, Massachusetts just north of Boston. He prides himself in losing his Boston accent as result of serving our country in United States Air Force during the Vietnam War. He was stationed in the south and was ridiculed as a Yankee, which is no surprise there, but now he can say, I can park my car rather than I can than “I can pak my cah”. 

When he was three his parents moved from the city to the burbs and he lived near a small farm. He instantly fell in love with the farm life and work there from the age of 10 to 15 until he can get a job so the government could take his taxes. On the farm, he fed cows, care for horses, and collected eggs from chickens, who peck his hands for stealing their future chicks from under them. 

He also learned a lot of wisdom by gaining knowledge shoveling pig manure into a spreader during corn season. Karl is also an avid musician and was affected by it at a young age. Ultimately, Karl received a Master’s degree from Boston University. And he currently serves on the Board of Directors of the Customer Experience Professionals Association and is on several CXPA committees.

He also served in past leadership positions within the American Society of Training and Development. Karl is well published, two most recent articles which appeared in two prominent customer experience management journals. In addition to his professional customer experience persona he doubles as a singer-songwriter musician and has recorded two CD’s of his original music today. 

Karl currently resides in Quincy, Massachusetts with his wife Carol who’s a professor at the University of Massachusetts, Boston in systems thinking, He has two kids that live in the area Andrew and Aaron and one grandchild and two stepchildren in California. Okay, Karl, I’ve shared with our listeners a little bit about you, can you share what your current passion is so that we can get to know you better?

Karl Sharicz:     Well, everything you mentioned is my passion and if I could work on a farm today I probably still be doing it. If I could be a rock ‘n roll musician and tour the globe I think I’ll do that too, it’s all my passion. And thank you for that introduction, you made me sound like a real renaissance down here. 

Jim Rembach:     I think you kind of are. You can even hear the energy in your voice when you talk about those things it’s kind of like, unending, un-bounding, where does which come from?

Karl Sharicz:       I don’t know. I’ve always had a pretty optimistic and positive attitude towards life and it’s my downfall too because I enjoy so many things, sometimes I think I spend myself too thin. But it’s all out there, it’s all there to experience, I love to do it. 

Jim Rembach:   I find myself having some of the same issues and I say that a lot time I chase shining object.  My word for this year was focus cause I need to do a better job of that. And so, for you, how do you stay on track?

Karl Sharicz:  It’s not easy sometimes. You indicated I do a lot of things and a lot of committees and I’m trying to run a business and I’m trying to keep up with all of my colleagues, friends and family and it’s just a matter of time sharing, it’s just making sure that you give everybody a little bit of attention every now and then. We have a lot of friends, my wife and I, we managed to see everybody on an intervals that is acceptable to everybody, so we just do our best to doing that. It’s not easy but you have to want to do that, I think is the real key. 

Jim Rembach:   I think what you just hit on is a really important point and doing those things and kind of being methodical in having structure around that while you continue to move a lot of things forward, you can’t just sit back and wait from that to happen you’ve got a be active and engaged within it, I think that’s where your energy kind of helps. 

Karl Sharicz:     And it comes from spontaneity to, so, I’m not a big planning person. You would think I have the spreadsheets on all these, no. [Laugh] or project plans, no I don’t. 

Jim Rembach: That’s awesome that you can keep moving forward. I know that you being a musician and someone who’s focused in on people and passion, you’re very passionate man I appreciate that in you, is there not a quote or a passage or something that kind of drives you, I know you know a lot of lyrics from different music…

Karl Sharicz:  Song lyrics always resonate with me and there’s one bit of a lyric from a song by Spandau Ballet, and the lyric goes: “Tears turns to rust that fall on steel hearts.” When I first heard that it didn’t quite grab me then I started picturing that and I thought to myself, “Yeah, there’s a lot of steel hearts around and that’s what happens tears turned to rust. I don’t know how that kind of relates to a driving energy but it’s an inspirational phrase, I guess it’s what I’d say. But if we want to bring it back to a leadership quote, the one that kind of resonates with me and it comes from a gentleman, an author by the name of John C. Maxwell, and this is it:”Live the legacy you want to live” and it has a lot of significance to credibility as a leader cause it’s really saying you need to demonstrate an action on what you believe. And this comes from a book of his called “The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership”. He also said: “Our ability as leaders will not be measured by the buildings we build rebuilt or the institutions we’ve established but by how well the people we invested in carried on after we’re gone.” 

And you know, I have a personal example of that, because in my days as a training instructor for prior organizations, I had an opportunity to work with a lot of customers in trying to impart knowledge and skills that they needed to be able to do their work. And I must have had a profound impact on some of them because even to this day when I reconnect with some of them I still received comments from former students that say, “Gee, what a great learning experience you created there”,  back in 1984. And that’s the experience they had in the classroom, and that’s a very rewarding feeling for me to hear that from them, after all these years it sticks with people. 

Jim Rembach: I want to go back to the quote that you had mentioned about the tears and the steel hearts and the rust because I do think there is a lot of inspiration when you said that it connected for me when I think about you and that positivity piece that you were talking about. Oftentimes,  the positivity piece and also know be hit with some resistance, it could be the tears, so to speak, sometimes it’s a tear of joy, oftentimes it’s a tear of frustration. We talk about getting over the humps on the Fast Leader show in the onset of challenge, can think about a time when you had a hump to get over that may have generated some tears, something that is stuck with you and hope move it to a right direction?

Karl Sharicz:  Yeah. The one that comes to mind the most, and this has occurred over and over again, was when I was leading a training function that sounds like, I’m going back into the past year but this was a really… one that really stuck with me for a long time. It was back there in the 80’s and I was in the Sciences, I had a challenge because I was brand-new training director for a company and I really didn’t have any real education in the art and science of adult education, suppose I could have gone ahead and just as they say, “Wing it” but for me it’s not my style, so I looked into it and I said: “Is there way that I can get here fast?” And it turned out that Boston University offered a program on adult education, a Masters degree that you could get in nine months, that’s essentially a school year. It sounded great, I look into it, I knew it was the right program for me but the only hitch was you have to attend class on Friday and Saturday all day, so, try to sell that to your spouse at home and then you try to sell that your organization to say, I need every Friday off for the next nine months and get paid for it and also to my full-time job, it meant going to my organization and having to ask them to support me in doing this. The initial answer was, no, but not being one to take no for an answer, I thought, “How do I get to yes?” So, make a long story short, I got a group of colleagues together while I was on a business trip and we sat around full one day and I decided that this is the way to get DS I’ve got a bunch of people here, they’re all smart people, teams can really work together and come up with ideas, we start doodling on this and what we came up was the idea of creating an employment contract, in a way, if you sent me to school and you pay this money, the tuition had to paid upfront cause there was no tuition reimbursement opportunity here for this program because it was a bunch of money that has to be paid upfront. So, we put this idea together, I went to the HR department and kind of ranted by them to say to say what do you think? My boss at that time was the VP of Marketing, I brought this plan to him and he bought it and I sold them the plans but to me they had to pay 2/3rd of the tuition upfront and 1/3rd…after that you have signed up to the course and they did that and I had a contract with them that allowed me to continue working, and of course, I have to pay them back if I left the organization cause they invested in me. I mean it’s a creative way of trying to get yes and I always thought that was one of my more significant sales opportunities, let’s put it that way. Perseverance can pay off and what it said to me was, teams can often do and come up with more creative solutions than you can as an individual. And basically focusing on the customer because I’ve really counts the benefits to the organization rather than what was going on within me. I knew I needed this education but I’m not surely they realize this much but the benefit of it to them, I think it’s what sold it. Basically, I ask for the order and I got it, name your sale. 

Jim Rembach: We’re telling that story to others something that’s kind of really stood out to me, and that, oftentimes, folks when they are told no they won’t do what you did from a very methodical, you say you don’t did checklists and all that stuff but I hate to tell you that that was very methodical. [Laugh]  So, you’re doing the computations and the framing and all that stuff within your head, obviously because going through the process, gaining that commitment and consensus that social buying and proof, a going through and in building the business case, and taking time doing it not getting aggressive and ugly in the process, staying positive, really there was several factors that got you to the point of yes. So, if you think about today, where we are today what you see most people do of that story, what was one piece of advice you would give to our listeners?

Karl Sharicz:  Don’t give up and don’t try to go it alone, very simple. There is a way around just about everything. Everything has a solution. I think a lot of times we want to give up on it because we think we can’t see it, and it could be it’s just lurking out there. There’s a barrier and that barrier has to be removed in order for you to see it. And I think that whole approach to bringing in and working with other people is real key element to that because a lot of times you could drive yourself crazy trying to do it all and trying to think through it all on your own. 

Jim Rembach:    It’s a great point that you mentioned that. Myself, I found that I was getting a little bit stagnated in regards to being able to expand some of the things that I was wanting to think about. I knew there was more wanted to talk to early think about media. I knew there was more, I knew I had to get a different perspective and so I just reached out to strangers and said, “Hey, would you be interested in participating in this small group of folks so that we can coach each other, and help each other, and support each other. And the first question that people were asking me was, “Okay, what does it cost me?” It’s like no I’m not asking for money I needed to seek out that that mastermind or hunt group to be part of, so that I could get the coaching that otherwise would not be getting on my own and sometimes it’s not so easy to find. I think you bring up a really good point, is that, don’t sit in isolation. And you know, and sometimes that isolation isn’t necessarily very visible. You have to realize the environment you’re in and to expand yourself you have to be the first one to do the experience. 

Karl Sharicz:  Can I share with you, there was a piece of this that came out of my experience at Boston University and I think it’s relevant, and now you’re going to say, Oh, Karl you’re really an organized  person, after you hear this. Problem solving—every day we’re faced with problem we need to solve, you wake in the morning and the theory doesn’t work. Okay, so, I put less technical problems aside and make it a humanistic problem but it’s a long process if you try to do it on your own. When I was at Boston University, I learn the concept called Synectics, it’s a long story but I’ll give you essentially the summary of it, problems can be solved in methodical ways by first when you look at a problem and you say, “What are the three most positive things that I can say about this issue that I’m facing here?” So, let’s say it’s not raining today here but it could be and if it was, and I’d say, “I’m not particularly fond of a rainy day but what three things can I say about a rainy day that would be positive?” I could say, “Well, you know, we needed the water it’s pretty dry and if you’re in Southern California you might say, ‘Finally we got rain’ or you can say, ‘Rain helps the garden grow’ so, that’s another positive side on it. Or you could say, “I am into a project that I needed to do, it’s good that it’s raining so I don’t feel the need to be outside in that warm sunshine that I like to be out at.” 

So what you do there, you’ll look at the other side of the spectrum and so, there’s always the problem has some negative aspects of it.  So, what you do is you helps them in opportunities that you are trying to overcome. So for example, on a rainy day you could say, “Rainy days are gloomy so all I need to do is find something that would cheer me up like maybe listening to those 1,250 CD’s there in my cabinets upstairs.” So, you get the idea, you focus on three positives followed by three challenges that if they were overcome this would lead you towards the possible outcome. So, there’s a lot more to it than that but that’s the general concept.  I’ve used that in number of times since those days at Boston University and it served me well. 

Jim Rembach: I thank you for sharing that. That is something that we all could look into to see if they can help us over the hump faster. I know that you’re going through some transitions, you’re doing some things a little bit differently you even became a content curator for the CX-PA, you’re doing some really exciting things right now, but of all things that you are currently looking at it have on your plate, what is one just really excites you the most?

Karl Sharicz:  The big thing that’s happening right now since I left my former organization, Tyco, last fall, is building a consulting business and that is CX Partners, that’s what I’m called. I had been thinking about that for several years, I started developing the business plan, there I go again in my organization in my mind, a couple of years ago but I put it aside because I’m working full time and nothing really prompted me to leave and start my own business. But then last summer the organization in their creative approach to downsizing started offering packages to keep the 15 plus years in the organization, and I had the opportunity to say yes or no and I said yes. So, I left the really good program that I’ve built over 11 years in good hands and that gave 

I also do some teaching. I did some teaching at Boston University, my alma mater, and taught some courses or classes I say in customer experience. But it’s amazing to see the young minds of people who are about to graduate in college and they earn a graduate degree, get enlightened with customer experience and I enjoy bringing them into the fold if you are bringing them into the process.

Jim Rembach: The Fast Leader legion wishes you the very best. Alright, here we go Fast Leader listeners it is time for the—Hump Day Hoedown. Okay, Karl, the Hump Day Hoedown is the part of our show where you give us good insights fast. I’m going to ask you several questions and your jobs is to give us a robust, yet rapid responses that are going to help us move onward and upward faster. Karl Sharicz, are you ready to hoedown?

Karl Sharicz:  Hoedown then. 

Jim Rembach:    Alright. What do you think is holding you back from being an even better leader today?

Karl Sharicz:  I don’t think a damn thing. [Laugh] Whatever holds you back is self imposed, go for it. Try new things. If you’re not trying and failing you’re not learning.

Jim Rembach:  I love it. What is the best leadership advice you had ever received?

Karl Sharicz:  Well, I’m not going to put it in the terms of advice, but I would say being honest with yourself, integrity and being honest with yourself goes a long way. I can’t make this in short; I have to tell them a little bit of a story. My uncle, he passed away some years ago in Canada, thought me a valuable integrity lesson when I was in my teens. I use to spend summers in Nova Scotia and he made a living, in part out of up breaking moss, Irish moss, off rocks in a boat at low tide. 

So, he had to get up in some early mornings and so you’d rake these moss off of the rock you bring it back, you’d spread it out on the side of the road and you’d let it dry because it had to be soiled dry, it was sold by weight. He was a stickler for that moss being dry, he would not pick it up and put it in the knapsack when the burlap stuck until that was dry, that was integrity because he could have left it damp and he could gotten a higher weight, and he could have made more money, people didn’t have a lot of money but he was stickler for that honesty and integrity in making sure that product was completely dried so that he could sell an honest product to the buyer year after year, and to me that was a valuable lesson at a young age. 

Jim Rembach:   What is one of your secrets that you believe contributes to your success?

Karl Sharicz:  As a leader, I’ve always been one that gets down in the trenches of time with people that I’m leading. I’m a natural doer, you can tell, and that comes from having been there and done that, probably derived from the farm years ago. When you’re in a leadership position you have to willing to roll up your sleeves and get into the action when it’s necessary to show people you not just talk you’re part of the action, you’re part of the team. When they see that they know you care they’re willing to be part of the team’s solution and people respect you more. What’s that saying, People don’t care what you know until they know that you care.

Jim Rembach:    What do you feel is one of your best resources that helps you lead in business or life?

Karl Sharicz:  I read a lot of books. I think you know, let’s see which one of the more recent ones, I think it was Drive by Dan Pink. This one’s about motivation, what’s gets people to do things, this is the influence of partner, it turns out in research shows that it’s intrinsic motivation that helps fire up businesses because problems are complex they’re not linear problems it’s not a carrot stick model in leadership and motivation sales when problems don’t have that obvious solution. In fact, Dan Pink, if you look him up on YouTube, you’ll see a 20 minutes Ted talk and he does a real good job of summarizing that book. I’m a reader. I like the slower pace of reading and highlighting, underlining, and be reading sentences because I like the way they’re written, writing notes in the margins and making it personalized, that’s how I engage in books. But I would say, continuously keeping up with your profession, whatever aspects that takes on leadership or otherwise.

 Karl Sharicz:  Well, I was going to ask you about a book, we’re going to make that connection with drive on our show notes page and you’ll be able to find that at fastleader.net/Karl Sharicz. Okay, Karl this is my last Hump Day Hoedown question: Imagine you woke up tomorrow morning and you were 25 years old again and you’re supposed to begin a new job as a manager of a team that is underperforming and disengaged but you have retained all the wisdom and skill that you currently have, your job, of course, is to turn the team around, so you get up, you get ready and you head out to work, what do you do now?

Karl Sharicz:  [Laugh] Well, if people are disengaged that means they’re probably their voices aren’t being heard, I’d sit down with each member of the team individually and let them tell me from their perspective what’s going on, what’s working, what’s not working. And I’ll also use that as an opportunity to give them insights on me. What I’m all about, how I lead, how I manage, how I make decisions. There may be some people that are on the team that aren’t onboard cause they don’t want to be part of the team, and that’s fine too. And it’s right and proper to help people get to where they want to be even if that means leaving the team neither that’s by their choice or my choice. 

And then I’ll probably start having some team dialogue sessions with the full team, provide everyone with an open forum to bring out and discuss and dialogue and issues and share ideas or resolutions and I’d use that Synectics tactic that I’ve described earlier. And once speak about these issues that are on the table and clearly understood, delineated, and I’ll write it I’ll put it in written form so everybody can see it and think about it just as the teams’ project we all have a part in this. And I think that gets you on the pathways towards engagement and improved performance.

Jim Rembach: Karl, it was an honor to spend time with you today. Please share with the Fast Leader listeners how they can connect with you?

Karl Sharicz:  Email me at Karl@cxpartners.us that’s my website. They can go to www.cxpartners.us which is my website, there’s contact information there. Or they can reach out to me through the CXPA.

Jim Rembach:     Karl Sharicz, thank you for sharing your knowledge and wisdom, the Fast Leader legion honors you and thanks you for helping us get over the hump. Woot Woot!

Thank you for joining me on the Fast Leader show today. For recaps, links from every shows, special offers, access to download and subscribe, if you haven’t already, head on over the fastleader.net so we can help you move onward and upward faster.

 

END OF AUDIO

 

 

jeannie walters leadership podcast fast leader show

019: Jeannie Walters: It felt like I wanted to run away

Jeannie Walters Show Notes

When Jeannie Walters learned about the acquisition of one of her favorite clients during the financial crisis of 2008 it wasn’t the loss of a major contract that impacted her most. Instead she found meaning in something bigger. Listen to Jeannie tell her story of how she got over the hump so you can too.

Jeannie Walter grew up in North Brook, IL as the youngest of five kids. Her fondest childhood memories were of epic camping trips with Dad, Mom, kids and the dog in their pop-up trailer. Despite the conflicts that can happen in large families Jeannie lives her life with the goal to leave a legacy of kindness.

Currently, Jeannie is the CEO/Founder of 360Connext, a global Customer Experience consulting firm. She has more than 16 years of experience helping companies improve retention, employee engagement, and overall customer experience.

Jeannie’s expertise in customer experience is what earned her place as a TEDx speaker. The video’s popularity inspires her to collect microinteractions, which are the small, sometimes unnoticed things that can have a huge impact on the customer experience.

She is a charter member of the Customer Experience Professionals Association. As a member of Vistage International, she was Member of the Year in 2007. She was also a member of former Illinois State Treasurer Judy Baar Topinka’s Advisory Board for Women’s Issues. Walters was awarded the Businesswoman of the Year in 2001 by the Business Ledger and as An Outstanding Woman of Achievement in 2002 by the Girl Scouts of America.

Jeannie is also a very active writer and blogger, and has a large social media following and was recognized by the Huffington Post as one of “The Top 100 Most Social Customer Service Pros on Twitter.”

Jeannie currently resides in Oak Park, IL with her husband Mike and her two sons Brady and Nolan.

Tweetable Quotes and Mentions

Listen and @jeanniecw will help you get over the hump on @FastLeaderShow Click to Tweet

“Social media puts a magnifying glass on certain areas, and gives certain people a megaphone.” -Jeannie Walters Click to Tweet

“There are people who love to get up on their soap box and complain.” -Jeannie Walters Click to Tweet

“I really believe that most humans are reasonable.” -Jeannie Walters Click to Tweet

“We all have to get a little better and that’s really what life’s about” -Jeannie Walters Click to Tweet

“I tried always to do better, saw always a little further, I tried to stretch myself.” Audrey Hepburn by Jeannie Walters Click to Tweet

“I really like to focus on making small changes and looking one step ahead.” -Jeannie Walters Click to Tweet

“Life’s too short to work with people you don’t admire and respect.” -Jeannie Walters Click to Tweet

“If you have the choice, work with people that inspire you.” -Jeannie Walters Click to Tweet

“If you don’t have anybody in the room to look up to then you have to be the one.” -Jeannie Walters Click to Tweet

“Set small things and take the right action every day.” -Jeannie Walters Click to Tweet

Hump to Get Over

Jeannie learned about the acquisition of one of her favorite clients during the financial crisis of 2008 and found herself in a personal moment of truth that impacted here more than losing a major client contract. Listen to Jeannie’s story so you can learn to move onward and upward faster.

Advice for others

Life’s too short to work with people you don’t admire and respect. If you have the choice work with people who inspire you and they will continue to do that.

Holding her back from being an even better leader

I am not as hyper organized as I should be.

Best Leadership Advice Received

It’s better to tell the truth early, rather than to try to cover it up.

Secret to Success

Staying positive and taking one action a day that will lead to the next big goal.

Best Resources in business or Life

My kids. They provide a lot of wisdom at odd times and keep me grounded.

Recommended Reading

The Leader’s Voice: How Your Communication Can Inspire Action and Get Results!

Contacting Jeannie

Twitter: https://twitter.com/jeanniecw

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jeanniewalters

Crack the Customer Code Podcast: http://www.crackthecustomercode.com/

More Resources

Jim Rembach on Jeannie’s podcast (Crack the Customer Code): http://crackthecustomercode.com/102-jim-rembach-fast-leader/

54 Emotional Intelligence (EQ) Competencies List: Emotional Intelligence has proven to be the right kind of intelligence to have if you want to move onward and upward faster. Get your free list today.

Show Transcript: 

Click to access edited transcript

019: Jeannie Walters: It felt like I wanted to run away

 Intro: Welcome to the Fast Leader Podcast, where we uncover the leadership like hat that help you to experience, break out performance faster and rocket to success.  And now here’s your host, customer and employee engagement expert and certified emotional intelligent practitioner, Jim Rembach.

Jim Rembach:   Alright, Fast Leader legion, I am so excited to have the person who I have on the show today, she is one of kindest people that I have had the opportunity meet in my life and that’s the legacy that she wants to leave. She’s also a phenomenal leader. Jeannie Walters is a member of Faith Popcorn’s Talent Bank and a charter member of the Customer Experience Professionals Association.

 

 As a member of Vestige International, she was a Member of the Year in 2007. She served as a member of former Illinois State Treasurer, Judy Baar Topinka’s advisory board for women’s issues. Walters was awarded businesswoman of the year in 2001 by the Business Ledger and as an Outstanding Woman of Achievement in 2002 by the Girl Scouts of America. And you know what, she has two boys, so we have to find out how that came in [inaudible 1:03] she’s a very active writer and has her own podcast called Crack the Customer Code, which you can find on iTunes.

 

She has a large social media following and is recognized by the Huffington Post as one of the top 100 most Social Customer Service pros on Twitter. Jeannie grew up in Northbrook, Illinois and was the youngest of five kids and had some epic camping trips with mom, dad, kids, dog and a pup of trailer. And she stayed in the Chicago area lives in Oak Park with her two sons Brady 10, Nolan 8 and her husband Mike.  Jeannie Walters, are you ready to help us get over the hump?

 

Jeannie Walters:     Wow! I hope so. Thanks Jim. 

 

Jim Rembach:      Thank you for being here. I’ve given our listeners a brief introduction but can you please tell us what your current passion is so that we can get to know you better?

 

Jeannie Walters:      Sure. A long time now my passion has been around Customer Experience. And the mission of our company is to create fewer ruins days for customers. And the reason I created that mission statement was because when I think about my own experience as a customer, I am fitting to a lot of demographics, I am “sucker mom”, I’m a business owner, I’m all these things, so when I go in and have a bad experience at a bank or when I can’t do something on mind that I want to do, or something doesn’t work on mobile that can ruin my day. And unfortunately, sometimes we carry that throughout our lives and so this is why I’m so passionate about it, I really believe that if we provide better experiences for people in general, everybody else benefits from it. 

 

Jim Rembach:     I think we all lose track, in that, all of us have customer experiences even if we have customers and these days who doesn’t have customers who doesn’t have people that they have to interact with in order to have whatever experience it may be, really full of less stress, be more enjoyable, be something that we could not be used as something to pinpoint as being lousy in our day. So, the definition is so broad, for you, when you start saying customer experience what does that mean to you?

 

Jeannie Walters:      It’s a great question. I think customer experience is often define as perception as how people feel about an overall company or organization based on the experiences they ask have. I actually feel like—that’s part of it. But the customer experiences everything from how you are introduced to a company all the way through when you might leave them and why you might leave them. It’s every single reaction you have and the perceptions that go along with that. 

 

I have a perception about some companies even though I’ve never worked with them even though I’ve never been their customer. But I understand that their customer experience maybe isn’t something I want to purchase paid in, that’s part of the customer experience too. 

 

Jim Rembach:     You know, that’s a very interesting point you bring up and with you being recognized someone who’s very socially active in the customer experience space. There was a study that I was reading that talked about the complaints that are on social media about different companies, and that for one particular company when they analyze those complaints they found out that 80% of the negative noise were from people who weren’t even their customers. So, do you think that perceptions about companies are growing from a negative perspective or indifferent or positive perspective? Where do you see the trend going?

 

Jeannie Walters:      I think social media helps us put a magnifying glass on certain areas and also gives certain people a megaphone, but those people have always been the loud mouths anyway. I’m not a huge fan of focus groups as a way to do research simply because there’s always one really opinionated loud mouth in the group and that can sway a lot of people who are just willing—they don’t want to put themselves in that situation of being confrontational. And I think the same thing happens with social media, there are people who love to get up on their soapbox and complain and talk about what’s going wrong. And then they are the people who sit back and they might take in that information but then they’re reasonable people, I really believe that most humans are reasonable. 

 

And so, if you have something that happens and as an organization, come back and say, “We looked into this and this is what we learned about it” and present that side of the story it gives everybody a fair shot to understanding experience better. Well, I think that, social media is a tool that is great for communication. I also think we can get caught up in looking at the negative side of it. It’s an important tool for organizations to understand that they have that same ability to share their side of the story and to be human about it and if you are human, humans respond to that, it’s really that simple.

 

Jim Rembach:  I think what you’re talking about is really inspiration and even your message is saying that: Look, don’t focus on the negative stuff, here’s an opportunity to have a positive platform and that in itself is inspirational, so thank you for sharing that. And we focus on leadership quotes here on the Fast Leader show, cause they are just that, they’re inspirational and they’re perception based, we take some information within words and then we start pulling it inside and it has some strength for us, is there a quote for you that has some strength?

 

Jeannie Walters:       Yeah. A few years ago, I heard a documentary or quick bio piece on Audrey Hepburn and I’d always admired her because I grew up watching her movies with my mom, it’s really great memory for me to see what she did with her life, she became an ambassador, she did all sorts of things. And I had to look it up today because all I could remember about it was she talked about how we all have to get a little better. And that’s really what life is about, so the quote is: “I tried always to do better so always a little further I tried to stretch myself.” It’s so simple but it’s so meaningful because I think it’s easy when you’re a leader sometimes to go for big goal and when you get knocked down you think you failed or think that it’s over or you can’t get to that next big goal. And I really like to focus on making small changes and looking one step ahead instead of getting too caught up in trying to overachieve, I guess. 

 

Jim Rembach:     Even when you say that I started to think about how I even do that personally. It isn’t necessarily trying to do it for others. One of our previous guest, a leadership freak, Dan Rockwell talked about what drives him in order to write about leadership every single day of the year. And he says he has to remind himself, “You better get down there” because he wants to make a difference, and so it’s very inspirational. I think that quote in itself is going to have a lot of different meaning for different folks both men and women. Thank you for sharing that. Now, without a doubt, even if you start going back and looking at all you siblings and those camping trips, we have humps to get over in our life and they define who we are really help us grow and reach just like that quote that you shared with us? Is there a time where you had a hump to get over that defined you and that has really stuck with you? Can you share that story with us please? 

 

Jeannie Walters:      Sure. We were consulting very large organizations when the financial crisis hit in 2008 and one of my favorite clients was this amazing bank that serve people through community development and they had a triple bottom line approach with the environment as one of the factors profitability and community development. And they were going through a terrible time and when they were acquired, which we expected, I went to the women I was working with and I said, “How can we help you here? Because I knew that our contract was basically over, based on the bigger bank taking over and I knew that she was in a top spot. She was worried about us and she was saying, “Well, I’m trying to get your contract” and I said, “Don’t worry about that, what can we do for you?” And it was really a great example for me to go back on and think about at that time I really needed her as much as she needed me and we were supporting each other for the very right reasons of just being kind to one another. And I was very inspired by her because she really went out of her way to take her of her community even though the resources were so limited at that point of what she could do.

 

And so, it was a huge blow to lose that contract, honestly, but what I took away from it was it was about something bigger, it was about that relationship. And she ended up retiring a few years later and inviting me to her retirement party and it was amazing because I learned even more about her and the things she had done and the people who turned out and the recognition from the city and all these places that she was just remarkable person and I was so grateful that in that moment that was scary that it felt like I wanted to run away a little bit, that  it was a lesson for me of—you know that sometimes it’s about doing the right thing and that serves you in different ways and maybe your initial goal. 

 

Jim Rembach:     I can imagine that—going through that for both of you like you were talking about, it had to be very stressful. You had to open up just a whole lot of different thoughts in your mind that sometimes later we can adjust—oftentimes move past that time or get over that hump later. But if there was one piece of advice that you would give to our listeners from that story, what would it be? 

 

Jeannie Walters:      I’d like to say life’s too short to work with people you don’t admire and respect. And even clients and customers I think that if you have the choice work people who inspire you and to continue to do that even if the business opportunity isn’t there in that moment look beyond that and really look to that relationship.

 

Jim Rembach:    That is something that I think ultimately we can all strive forward we’d like to have. It’s kind of like that business utopia when we’re serving. But if you’re not in that position and you fell stuck and I’ve seen it—I’m probably there now in certain situations, how do you position yourself get past that so you can seek those clients and you can be not worried about the fact that you have to feed your family, do you have some advice on how we can do that?

 

 Jeannie Walters:   Yeah. I got great advice from one of my very first mentors and he told me once that if I don’t have anybody in the room that I can look up to, then I need to be the one look up to. And there are times where sometimes you have to own that a little bit and understand that maybe in this situation your role is to be that person instead of looking for that.

 

Jim Rembach:   That’s an awesome piece of advice. A lot of times we do, I mean, our eyes are pointing out and so were looking but oftentimes maybe we need to be reflecting. Maybe it’s us that we have to stand up and take that responsibility. Thank you again for sharing that. So, I know you are doing a lot of things with your company, being a mom of two young boys as a mom and sure as a spouse as well, but what about your current—well, life or business is really driving you and giving you that energy ?

 

Jeannie Walters:      Well, it does comes down to my two boys because part of why I started this business in 2009 was because it gave me the flexibility—it’s a virtual business, I have a team but we are all over the world, I work from home and I’m able to do things like walking my kids to school every day. They go to school three blocks from Ayren. When we’ve had school events I just put that on my calendar and I’m able to go do that. And so, knowing that I have that flexibility, knowing that there are times I’m sacrificing by working late hours or by getting up very early to get some work done, I know what’s driving me to do that and it is about creating a life—it’s not perfect and it’s not easy but at the same time I know that I’m going to have all this time to look back on where I was really there with my kids.

 

Jim Rembach:    I think for me too, kind of in a similar situation, I probably don’t take as much time doing that and listening to—I need to make sure I put more things on my calendar do just that. If you start thinking about yourself, going back to the quote that you had mentioned from Audrey Hepburn, what are some of the goals that you have?

 

Jeannie Walters:       I always have way too many goals [Laugh] that’s one of my downfalls. I set a goal last year, I started running last year so I’m doing my second 5K this weekend and eventually I’d like to do a 10K and keep moving up on that. I am doing a lot around writing and podcasting as you know, but I would love to write a book, that’s on my list. I would love to work with more organizations that inspire me and I have aspirational list of organizations I want to work with. And really it’s about—and I of course, as somebody who works from home and is in my house a lot, I have a list of things I want to do house, cause I see them all the time. Overall, I feel like it is about setting those small things and just taking the right action every day, that’s what I try to do. 

 

Jim Rembach:     I think that’s a good point. Just take an action even if it’s a little one at least there’s movement. I often say, sometimes you need to just go ahead and take those two steps back because ultimately it may lead to three steps going forward, that’s kind of hard thing for us to swallow, the Fast Leader legion wishes you the very best. 

 

Alright here we go Fast Leader listeners, it’s time for the—Hump Day Hoedown. Okay, Jeannie the Hump Day Hoedown is a part of our show where you give us good insights fast. I’m going to ask you several questions and it’s you job to give us robust yet rapid responses that are going to help us move onward and upward faster. Jeannie Walters are you ready to hoedown?

 

Jeannie Walters:    I’m ready. 

 

Jim Rembach:    Alright. What do you think is holding you back from being an even better leader today?

 

Jeannie Walters:       I’m, not as hyper-organized as I should be. 

 

Jim Rembach:     I can attest to that one myself. What is the best leadership advice you have ever received?

 

Jeannie Walters:     It’s better to tell the truth early rather than try to cover it up. 

 

Jim Rembach:     Noted. What is one of your secrets that you believe contributes to your success?

 

Jeannie Walters:       Staying positive and taking one action a day that will lead you to the next big goal. 

 

Jim Rembach:    What do you feel is one of your best resources that helps you lead in business or life?

 

Jeannie Walters:       My kids. [Laugh] They provide a lot of wisdoms at odd times and keep me grounded. 

 

Jim Rembach:     What would be one book you would recommend to our listeners? I know there’s many, just kind of that go-to that you always go back to?

 

Jeannie Walters:        One that I really love is called the “Leaders Voice” it’s by Boyd Clarke and I’m going to blank the other guy, but they work for Tom Peters and it’s about how we internalize communication and three ways and how to provide communication that way. It’s a really great book. 

 

Jim Rembach:    That’s awesome. Okay, Fast Leader listeners you can find link and other bonus information from today’s show by going to fastleader.net/Jeannie Walters. Okay, Jeannie, this my last Hump Day Hoedown question: Imagine you woke up tomorrow morning and you were 25 years old again. You’re supposed to begin a new job as a manager of a team of people that is underperforming and disengaged but you have retained all the wisdom and skills that you currently have. Your task is to turn the team around so you get up you get ready and you head out to work, what do you do now?

 

Jeannie Walters:      I listen. I’ll take them in one by one and listen to what they have to say, and then basically there’s a new sheriff in town, and help the right people get on the bus. 

 

Jim Rembach:    That was good. Alright, Jeannie it was an honor to spend time with you today. Can you please share with Fast Leader listeners how can they connect with you?

 

Jeannie Walters:      Absolutely, thank you. You can find me at 360connext.com as well as crackthecustomercode.com. 

 

Jim Rembach:      Jeannie, thank you for sharing your knowledge and wisdom the Fast Leader legion honors you and thanks you for helping us get over the hump.  Woot Woot!

 

Thank you for joining me on the Fast Leader show today. For recaps, links from every show, especial offers and access to download and subscribe, if you haven’t already, head on over the fastleader.net so we can help you move onward and upward faster. 

 

END OF AUDIO 

 

 

Dr. Ned Hallowell on Fast Leader Show Leadership Podcast

018: Ned Hallowell: Thanks to that hug    

When Ned Hallowell was trying to learn to read and couldn’t do it, growing up in the 1950’s, he could have been labeled as stupid and told to try harder. But Mrs. Eldridge, Ned’s First Grade teacher, knew there was more to kids not being able to read than being stupid. What she did, didn’t turn Ned into a better reader but it did something more that contributed to Ned majoring in English from Harvard College and graduating with high honors. Listen to Dr. Ned Hallowell tell his story of how he got over the hump and helps others do the same.

Dr. Ned Hallowell has ADHD and dyslexia. He sees them not as disorders but rather as traits that can bestow enormous benefit. When those traits are managed well, they can help you get over the hump faster. But if they are managed poorly or not recognized at all, they can lead to disaster.

Dr. Ned is a graduate of Harvard College, Tulane Medical School, and a Harvard residency and fellowship in adult and child psychiatry, Dr. Hallowell served on the faculty of the Harvard Medical School for 20 years until he retired from academia to devote his full professional time to seeing patients, writing books, and giving lectures and seminars.

He has written numerous books including his ground-breaking New York Times best-seller on ADD called Driven to Distraction which initially brought attention deficit disorder to the general public.

His books have sold over 2 million copies. He has appeared on every major TV show including Oprah, Good Morning America, The Today Show, CBS Morning Show, The View, Dr. Oz, Dr. Phil, 60 Minutes and CNN, and now the Fast Leader Show. Woot Woot!

Dr. Ned is the founder of the Hallowell Centers with offices in:

  • Sudbury, MA
  • New York City
  • San Francisco
  • Seattle

These centers specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of learning differences, especially ADHD and dyslexia, using a strength-based approach.

Currently Dr. Ned resides in Arlington, MA with his wife Sue and dog Ziggy. He also has three grown kids, Lucy, Jack and Tucker.

Tweetable Quotes and Mentions

Listen and @drhallowell will help you get over the hump on @FastLeaderShow http://goo.gl/JMCXOb #Leadership #Careers

“If you have ADHD it’s sort of like you have a Ferrari engine for a brain…but bicycle brakes.” -Ned Hallowell Click to Tweet

“ADHD untrained and unchained gets into all kinds of trouble.” -Ned Hallowell Click to Tweet

“I am in the business of promoting love.” -Ned Hallowell Click to Tweet

“I was a very enthusiastic reader, thanks to that hug.” -Ned Hallowell Click to Tweet

“When you worry with someone you start solving problems.” -Ned Hallowell Click to Tweet

“When you worry alone you often get depressed.” -Ned Hallowell Click to Tweet

“Understanding these goes beyond a sound bite, that is why I write a book.” -Ned Hallowell Click to Tweet

“(ADHD) It’s not a deficit…it’s not a disorder, but rather a trait.“ -Ned Hallowell Click to Tweet

“We live in an age that pushes superficial thinking.” -Ned Hallowell Click to Tweet

“If you’re going fast you can’t go deep.” -Ned Hallowell Click to Tweet

“We live in an age of distraction.” -Ned Hallowell Click to Tweet

“Hire people who are smarter than you are.”-Ned Hallowell Click to Tweet

“Never be threatened by people that are more talented than you are.” -Ned Hallowell Click to Tweet

“The great leader is the leader who gives credit to others.” -Ned Hallowell Click to Tweet

“We live in a paradoxical world where we’re super connected electronically, but under connected inter-personally.” -Ned Hallowell Click to Tweet

“A lot of people are suffering from a vitamin connect deficiency.” -Ned Hallowell Click to Tweet

“The most powerful wisdom is the most ancient wisdom.” -Ned Hallowell Click to Tweet

Hump to Get Over

Ned Hallowell has ADHD and dyslexia. When he was trying to learn to read and couldn’t do it, growing up in the 1950’s, he could have been labeled as stupid and told to try harder. But Mrs. Eldridge helped to inspire Ned go on to Harvard College, Tulane Medical School, and a Harvard residency and fellowship in adult and child psychiatry. He has written over twenty books selling over 2 million copies. Listen to Dr. Ned’s story so you can learn to move onward and upward faster.

Advice for others

Never worry alone. You will encounter obstacles and you may be inclined to hunker down and take care of it, but don’t do that. Talk to somebody.

Holding him back from being an even better leader

I need more knowledge.

Best Leadership Advice Received

Hire people that are smart than you are. Promote others and not yourself.

Secret to Success

My ability to connect with others.

Recommended Reading

ESV New Classic Reference Bible

The Oxford Shakespeare: The Complete Works 2nd Edition

Contacting Ned Hallowell

Website: http://www.drhallowell.com 

Twitter: https://twitter.com/drhallowell

More Resources

Distraction Podcast with Dr. Ned Hallowell

Free Introduction to Driven to Distraction at Work Intro Download.

Show Transcript: 

Click to access edited transcript

018: Ned Hallowell: Thanks to that hug 

 

Intro: Welcome to the Fast Leader Podcast, where we uncover the leadership like hat that help you to experience, break out performance faster and rocket to success.  And now here’s your host, customer and employee engagement expert and certified emotional intelligent practitioner, Jim Rembach.

Jim Rembach:   Thanks Kimberly.  Okay Fast Leader legion, this show is one that’s very, very special to me because I think we have a chance to meet with somebody who’s really impacted the world with his work. He was born and raised in Ayer, Massachusetts but grown up in boarding schools in a couple different places throughout the country his name is Edward Hallowell. He has ADHD and dyslexia but Dr. Ned Hallowell sees them not as disorders rather straits that can bestow enormous benefit. When those straits are manage well they can help you get over the hump faster but their managed poorly or not recognize that—Oh, they can lead to disaster.

Dr. Ned is a graduate of Harvard College, Tulane Medical School and a Harvard Residency and Fellowship in Adult and Child Psychology. Dr. Hallowell served on the faculty of the Harvard Medical School for 20 years until he retired from academic to devote his full profession time to seeing patients, writing books and giving lectures and seminars. Dr. Ned has written numerous books including his ground breaking, New York Times bestseller on ADD called Driven to Distraction which initially brought Attention Deficit Disorder to the general public. Dr. Ned’s books have sold over 2 million copies. He’s appeared on every major TV show including Oprah, Good Morning America, the Today Show, CBS Morning Show, the View, Dr. Oz, Dr. Phil, 60 min. in CNN and now the Fast Leader show. Woot Woot!  

Dr. Ned is the founder of the Hallowell centers with offices in Sudbury, Massachusetts, New York City, San Francisco and Seattle. These centres specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of learning differences especially ADHD and dyslexia using a strength-based approach. Currently Dr. Ned resides in Arlington, Massachusetts with his wife Sue and his dog Ziggy but he also has three kids Lucy, Jack and Tucker. Dr. Ned are you ready to help us get over the hump?

Ned Hallowell:   Absolutely. 

Jim Rembach:   That’s awesome. So, I’ve given our listeners a brief introduction but can you please tell us what your current passion is so that we get to know you better?

Ned Hallowell:      I love bringing ADHD and dyslexia to the world as strengths. People who have these traits are there people who’ve made this country great. If you have ADHD, sort of like, you’ve got a Ferrari engine for a brain, you’ve got this way powerful creative mind but you have bicycle brakes. So, I tell people I’m a brake specialists, I’ll help you strengthen your breaks and if you strengthen your breaks you’re going to become an absolute winner you’re going to go right to the top.  Unfortunately if you don’t, well, that’s prison population. That’s what’s so interesting, cause, you know, a Ferrari with no breaks, precious. Well, ADHD, unchained, untrained gets into all kinds of trouble. I love my work, there’s almost messianic about it because it’s very high stakes, it’s making or breaking people at any age. My oldest patient is 96 and the treatment allowed him to write the book he’d wanted to write his entire life long. 

Jim Rembach:    That’s awesome. I had the opportunity to speak with somebody who had a two sets of twins and both sets have problems with Attention Deficit as well as no some other varying things that may oftentimes go with that disorder, she was actually paediatrician, she found herself really struggling with a lot of the information to help her own kids and so she decided to leave her practice as a pediatrician and go back and retrain herself so that she can help her kids do better. Because what she found that many use the disorder to crutch and the medication being provided to those people is being used as coping mechanisms instead of, like you had mentioned strengths. So what would be the key differences between the crutch and the strength and the movement?

Ned Hallowell:     I don’t have any idea what this crutch model means, it’s ridiculous. You have this condition and it’s a matter of learning to tap in to your strengths and minimize the damage done by your weaknesses. I have no idea what she meant saying using it as a crutch, I don’t know what that means. 

Jim Rembach:    I think that’s really a part of the difference and the impact that you’ve made, is that, you don’t see it that way at all. You’re like you’re…

Ned Hallowell:      I don’t know what it would mean. How does that manifest? How do you use it as a crutch? It makes no sense. She got to sit down and explain to me what she means by that. 

Jim Rembach:      No, I think that’s also—thanks for the focus. Thanks for the focus on the strengths, that’s an important piece. Now, without a doubt, we all have to seek inspiration especially when we have that strength base focus and oftentimes we lead to quotes and passages and things like that to help give us that inspiration, is there something for you that stands out as a favorite quote that helps you continue to move forward, can you share that with us please?

Ned Hallowell:    Oh, so many. I happen to believe in God, I’m an Episcopalian and so, you know, God is love and that’s the way I look at it and so I’m really in the business of promoting love, promoting….people understanding each other, seeing each other’s side instead of each other’s worse side, drawing out the loving side of people, that’s basically what I do as a doctor, not to mention as a person. I suppose my absolute core, I’m in the business of finding and promoting love, and for me that’s God and it saved my life and it saved many people’s lives. 

Jim Rembach:     I think that’s awesome, that’s for sharing that with us. Now, with you and yourself having ADHD and dyslexia, let’s not even look at that we all have humps to get over and it doesn’t matter if we have those things or not, is there a time where you can remember that you’ve had to get over a hump and that really helped shape you into who you are today? Can you share that story with us?

Ned Hallowell:     So many times—going back to the first grade when I’m sitting at a roundtable with other kids trying to learn read and I couldn’t do it. It came to be my turn and I couldn’t sound out the words. Back then, in the 1950s, they didn’t have learning specialist. If you couldn’t learn to read your diagnosis was you’re stupid and you’re supposed to try harder.  I had this wonderful first-grade teacher by the name of Mrs. Eldridge and she knew there was more to kids who couldn’t learn to read than being stupid. And what would she do? During reading she’d simply come down and sit down next to me. And she put she put her arm around me, she was a [inaudible 7:11] woman so it was a big hug that she would give me. And she would hug me and next to her and as I would stammer and stutter none of the other kids would laugh at me because I had the mafia sitting next to me. And as a result I look forward to reading even though I was the worst reader in the class. By the end of the year I was still the worst reader in the class but I was a very enthusiastic student to reading, that’s to that hug. To this day I’m a painfully slow reader, that’s what dyslexia does but I did learn to read and I in fact, majored in English at Harvard College and graduated with high honors and now I make part of my living writing books so that would never had happened had it not been for that marvelous first grade teacher who is sort of an angel from heaven. 

Jim Rembach:  Without a doubt, so I want make a shout out to all of the Miss Eldridge’s in the world because we need you and more of you.

Ned Hallowell:   Do we ever, do we ever.

Jim Rembach:    Absolutely. Thanks for sharing that with us. Is there for you—like you were saying is that you were still the slow reader when you were young and you had shared with me that you’ve spent a lot of time in boarding schools and we all know that that can also be a difficult place because many boarding schools have a higher requirement regards to education and their standards are concerned, going through all of that and being able to continue to move forward and having so much success you had is there a piece of advice that you would give to our listeners?

Ned Hallowell:  One of the most important ones is never worry alone. You’ll encounter obstacles and you’ll be inclined to hunker down and try to take care of it, don’t do that talk to somebody. Obviously you want to pick that person carefully but when you worry with someone you start solving problems. When you worry alone you often get depressed. So never worry alone is really good advice. 

Jim Rembach:    That is good advice. I think a lot of times we do sit in isolation and that will most makes the worry more intensive. I know you had the initial book and then you have written several others since then. 

Ned Hallowell:    Twenty others. 

Jim Rembach:    Twenty others, thanks, I hope that keeps coming. And I know we’re going to have a gift for our Fast Leader legion her in a minute, but first before we do that I would like and see if you could share with me what is your current passion with the work that you’re doing and how that really drives you?

Ned Hallowell:     My passion is to bring these conditions, ADHD and dyslexia to the public in a way where they understand the strengths inherent in them and not just look at the downside. If you manage these conditions properly they become major assets that can drive you to tremendous success. 

Jim Rembach:    And you shared that with us earlier and I appreciate that. Is there like one or two things that you see as pretty common that folks can be able to be aware of or be able to take advantage of to help them do just that?

Ned Hallowell:  [Laugh] Mostly just to understand that the condition—it need not hold you back. Then you need to learn about it. It’s not a soundbite thing, Jim, I know you want me to give you some soundbite and one or two things. But really understanding, these goes beyond the soundbite and that’s why write a book instead of writing a sentence. But go to my book, Delivered from Distraction or Driven to Distraction and you’ll learn a lot about the kind of mind that we call so misleading the ADHD. It’s not a deficit and it’s really, in my opinion, not a disorder but rather a trait. But I can’t boil it into a soundbite. It sort of annoys me the way people want to do that. If I could I’d write a sentence, I wouldn’t write a book. We live in an age that really pushes superficial thinking. Really pushes bullets and soundbites and really resists going into the depths that you need to go into. If you’re going to understand anything in any degree of subtlety and it’s something that I resist.

Jim Rembach:   No and I appreciate that. You have the experience and that’s what we want to tap into. I think that’s important because you bring out one key factor about the Fast Leader show. Oftentimes, we do talk about the soundbites and pieces like that as far as that’s what it means to go fast but that is not true, in fact, to go faster you need to do things correctly. So, I do want to get down to what’s correct and your response definitely help us a ton. So that also leaves a…

Ned Hallowell:    Remember that if you’re going fast you can’t go deep and you have to pick one or the other, speed or depth. Going fast you can’t go deep. We live in an age that puts such a premium on speed that we often sacrifice depth.

Jim Rembach:    That’s a great point. For myself, I have found that when I do go deep with time it allows me to go faster because I won’t repeat…

Ned Hallowell:     No, no, once you deep you gain the knowledge that can speed your progress tremendously, absolutely.

Jim Rembach:      That’s exactly what we try to point out here in the Fast Leader show, is that, you got to get the depth, you’ve got to get the understanding, you can learn from experiences from others and that in itself will help you move onward and upward faster is to leverage those things.  And you have given us the opportunity to learn a little bit more, like you talk about why you don’t do bites you do books, and I love that, I’m going to use that that is a soundbite . You’ve given us the opportunity to download the introduction to your brand-new book Driven to Distraction At Work. Now, what was the inspiration behind that particular title?

Ned Hallowell:  We live in a major distraction, so this book is not about ADHD per se but it’s about the highly distracting environment that most people work in and I talk about different patterns of distraction, of different ways in which people allow themselves to lose focus and then I gave remedies as to what to do about it based on each pattern.

Jim Rembach:    I’m forward get that myself because I definitely need it. Alright, here we go listeners, it’s time for the rapid part of our show and that’s the—Hump Day Hoedown. Okay, Dr. Ned Hallowell: the Hump Day Hoedown is the part of our show where you give us good insights fast. I’m going ask you several questions and your job is to give us robust yet rapid responses that are going to help us move onward and upward faster,  Dr. Ned are you ready to hoedown?

Ned Hallowell:  I’m ready.  

Jim Rembach:    What do you think is holding you back from being a better leader today?

Ned Hallowell:   I need more knowledge. I’m always needing more knowledge and as much as I know when I’m 65 years old and I like to think I know a lot, I always need more knowledge the question is where to find it?  And which knowledge to trust. I’m endlessly curious, always seeking for that additional insight that will allow me to be more effective.

Jim Rembach:    So, what is the best leadership advice you have ever received?

Ned Hallowell:     To hire people who are smarter than you are. In other words, not be threatened by people who are more talented than you are. I think the great leader is the leader who gives credit to others, who doesn’t insist upon being the shiniest star but rather sees that his or her role is to promote the talents of other people, that’s the best advice I ever got—to promote others not promote yourself.

Jim Rembach:   What is one of your secrets that you believe contributes to your success?

Ned Hallowell:    My ability to connect with other people. I think connection is what folks are starved for. They don’t even know it but we live in a paradoxical world where we’re super connected electronically but under connected interpersonally. And I think a lot of folks in the workplaces are starved for that interpersonal connection, I call that ‘human moment’ instead of series of electronic moments. And when they get that, their productivity just soars. When they don’t have it it’s like a vitamin deficiency, I call it ‘vitamin connect’ the other vitamin C and a lot of people are suffering from a ‘vitamin connect’ deficiency.  

Jim Rembach:   That’s so true. Now, I know, with all your knowledge and skill that you have and yet to obtain on your quest, is there a particular book or two that kind of stands out, that kind of a go to book you would recommend for our listeners? 

Ned Hallowell:  [Laugh] The Bible. I say that, it’s a great go-to-book and if you just have one book that’s a good one. The collected works of Shakespeare that would be another one. I know these are not on the business bestseller list but I think the most powerful wisdom is the most ancient wisdom and we need to remind ourselves of it. Whether it’s the power love or the power of connection or the power of knowledge, the Bible, Shakespeare those are good sources to turn to. 

Jim Rembach:    I think that’s awesome. What we’ll do is we’ll put links to that and other pieces of information including the link to Dr. Ned’s download on our show notes page, which you’re going to find by going to fast leader.net/Ned Hallowell. Okay, Dr. Hallowell, this is my last Hump Day Hoedown question: Imagine you were given the opportunity to go back to the age of 25 and you have been given the opportunity to take your knowledge and skill back with you but you can’t take everything you can only choose one thing, what would you take back with you? And why? 

Ned Hallowell:     My ability to connect, that would be the thing that I would take because that to me is what people need most in terms of motivating them and bringing out their best. So, I would go back with that ability to connect and also bring back my knowledge that’s what matters most because a lot of 25-year-olds don’t get that. They think they’ve going to be the smartest person in the room and often they are the smartest person in the room but they make everyone dislike them because they’re so bad connect at connecting. 

Jim Rembach:   I think that’s great advice. I was an honor to spend time with you today. Can you please share with the Fast Leader listeners how they can connect with you?

Ned Hallowell:  Sure. Just go to my website Dr. Hollowell.com and you’re doing a great service with the show, I love the energy you bring to it, I love the passion you bring to it, it’s very clear you’re  passionate about this and this world needs more passionate people like you. 

Jim Rembach:   I appreciate that.  Dr. Ned, thank you for sharing your knowledge and wisdom, the Fast Leader legion honors you and thanks you for helping us get over the hump. Woot Woot! 

Thank you for joining me on the Fast Leader show today. For recaps, links from every show , special offers and access to download and subscribe, if you haven’t already, head on over the fastleader.net, so we can help you move onward and upward faster. 

 

END OF AUDIO 

 

 

Karyn Furstman on the Leadership Podcast Fast Leader Show: Be positively relentless

017: Karyn Furstman: Be positively relentless

Karyn Furstman Show Notes

When you have had a situation when you needed to get someone to buy-in to change what did you do? Join me as Karyn Furstman shares her story of how she has had success in her many years of leading transformation and change. Listen and learn how Karyn found strength with an approach that is not common practice but has provided her with uncommon results.

A seasoned executive with over 25 years of business experience, Karyn has held many roles of increasing responsibility. Her passion for championing the customer is evident throughout her career. Currently, Karyn is VP of Agent & Customer Experience for Safeco Insurance, a Liberty Mutual company, and leads the Customer Experience, Lean Process Improvements, Training and Communications organizations.

Previously, Karyn was Senior Vice President, Marketing Director for JPMorgan Chase, where she led the Washington Mutual (WaMu) Customer Communications transition team. At WaMu, Karyn held the first ever Retail Bank Customer Experience Executive role where she was responsible for creation, development and execution of the overall strategy. Karyn and her team improved quality and consistency of the Customer Experience across channels which drove increased loyalty and retention.

Karyn held prior management positions at WaMu as the P&L Executive responsible for the deposit product portfolio (checking, savings, CDs, money market investments) and served as Small Business Product Executive where she developed the overall segment strategy, secured board approval, and managed the implementation to over 2,000 retail branches and business sales managers.

Karyn was Senior Vice President at Bank of America for over 10 years in a variety of positions including sales support, product management, marketing communications, training, and technology strategy where she was Program Manager for the bank’s national Customer Relationship Management (CRM) program.

Before her move into financial services, Karyn spent over 10 years in various national advertising agencies in Seattle and Los Angeles, managing various consumer product and corporate accounts.

Karyn is certified as a Master Black Belt in Six Sigma and Lean methodologies.

Karyn serves as Vice Chairman and board member of the CXPA (Customer Experience Professionals Association); a national emeritus trustee position on the Freedom Writers Foundation; and Temple De Hirsh Sinai in Seattle, Washington. She is a mother of three boys, enjoys theatre and music, and as an avid reader, has belonged to her book club for over 25 years

Tweetable Quotes and Mentions

Listen and @customers_furst will help you get over the hump on @FastLeaderShow Click to Tweet 

“It’s the relationships with people that we have that carry us through.“ -Karyn Furstman Click to Tweet

“It’s all about feeding those relationships as you move forward in your life.” -Karyn Furstman Click to Tweet

“Find something that you’re passionate about and you’ll never work another day in your life.”-Karyn Furstman Click to Tweet

“Sometimes executives find it hard to know what to do to walk the walk.” -Karyn Furstman Click to Tweet

“Don’t take yourself to seriously and be authentic.” -Karyn Furstman Click to Tweet

“Sometimes it’s two steps forwards and three steps backwards.” -Karyn Furstman Click to Tweet

“Enjoy what you’re doing and the ride you are on together.” -Karyn Furstman Click to Tweet

“I believe that my work in customer experience is something that was meant for me to do.” -Karyn Furstman Click to Tweet

“This phase and this day is all we have.” -Karyn Furstman Click to Tweet

Hump to Get Over

Throughout her career Karyn has led transformation and change initiatives. As part of her responsibilities she needed to help executives at various levels buy-in. Karyn learned how to become positively relentless in her quest to help executives walk the walk. Listen to the show to find out just how Karyn does it, so you can move onward and upward faster.

Holding her back from being an even better leader

Her time management. Being able to make better use of her time.

Best Leadership Advice Received

Be authentic. Don’t be something you are not.

Secret to Success

Her ability to connect people and having a common greater good.

Recommended Reading

10% Happier: How I Tamed the Voice in My Head, Reduced Stress Without Losing My Edge, and Found Self-Help That Actually Works–A True Story

Contacting Karyn

Email: karyn.furstman@gmail.com

Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/customers_furst

More Resources

Eileen Kremen Gallery

Show Transcript: 

Click to access edited transcript

017: Karyn Furstman: Be positively relentless

 

Intro: Welcome to the Fast Leader Podcast, where we explore convenient yet effective shortcuts that will help you get ahead and move forward faster by becoming a better leader. And now here’s your host, customer and employee engagement expert and certified emotional intelligent practitioner, Jim Rembach.

Jim Rembach:   Thanks Kimberly. Okay, Fast Leader legion, this particular episode is really unique because in a moment I’m going to share with you an interview that was recorded on location at the Customer Experience Professional Association of Member Inside Exchange. I had the opportunity to interview Karyn Furstman who is the new chair of the association. Karyn is a seasoned executive with over 25 years of business experience. Karyn has helped many roles of increasing responsibility. Her passion for championing the customers is evident throughout her career. Karyn is the Vice President of Agent & Customer Experience for Safeco insurance, which is a Liberty Mutual company and lead the Customer Experience, LEAN Process Improvements, Training and Communications organizations. She was previously the Senior Vice President for JP. Morgan Chase where she led the Washington Mutual Customer Communications transition team. 

At Washington Mutual she held the first ever Retail Bank Customer Experience executive role where she was responsible for the creation, development, and execution of the overall strategy. Karyn and her team improved quality and consistency of the customer experience cross channels which drove increased loyalty and retention. Karyn also held positions at Bank of America where she was the Senior Vice President for 10 years in a variety of positions including Sales, Support, Product Management, Marketing Communications Training and Technology Strategy were she was the Program Manager for the bank’s National Customer Relationship Management Program. 

Before her moving to financial services, Karyn spent over 10 years in various national advertising agencies in Los Angeles and Seattle and she managed various consumer products and corporate accounts. She is a certified Master Black Belt in Six Sigma and Ling methodologies. Beyond all of this technical skill that she has amassed she is a fantastic leader and you’re going to really enjoy this interview and hear that side of Karyn’s success. So, now on to the interview with Karyn. 

I am so excited today folks, I have one of those ladies that I look up to and admire in so many different ways not just from her professional perspective but now also knowing that she has three boys a 16-year-old two twin 15-year-olds, you know she’s got to be a strong woman, it’s Karyn Furstman who was born and raised in Fullerton, California. Both of her parents were entrepreneurs. Her mama owned an art gallery and her dad on the pharmacy. And even from a very young age she worked in both of those places which helped shape who she is today. Currently, she resides in Bellevue, Washington and I’m so excited to have her, Karyn Furstman, are you ready to help us get over the hump?

Karyn Furstman:     I am thank you so much. 

Jim Rembach:      That’s awesome. No, I’ve given I guest a little bit about you but can you share something about your current passion is so that we can get to know you better? 

Karyn Furstman:     Sure. My current passion is really very much what my passion has been throughout my whole life. And as I’ve gotten more involved in working in the CX and the Customer Experience capabilities, I’ve realized that my passion is really around taking care of people, taking care of others and building relationships. Because it’s the relationships with people that we have that carry us through, regardless of it being a personal relationship or a business relationships, somebody that works for you or somebody that you work for, it’s all about feeding those relationships as you move forward in your life. 

Jim Rembach:   And also know that you’re one of those folks that does a great job of helping to build those relationships—Karyn, I know her through the Customers Experience Professionals Association she’s the Vice-Chair of the CXPA and I’m getting the chance to chat with her here at the Member Inside Exchange where she has played the role with helping to recognize folks for and taking care others as well, so it’s a community of care which is just absolutely awesome it’s one of the places that you definitely wanted to be. Karyn we have a lot of things that helped, motivated us and inspired us in a lot of ways and we focus on leadership quotes at Fast Leader show, is there one that stands out to you that drives you and pushes you forward each day?

Karyn Furstman:     Yeah. Absolutely. One thing I will say is it’s really an exciting day for me personally because I’m taking over as Chair of CXPA as of 5 o’clock tonight, so I’m really excited to be able to lead this organization going forward. To that point a leadership quote is really something I’ve lived with—again for many years my mother when passed away about five years ago, I was looking through and going through all of her possessions in her house, she own this art gallery, and I came across this typed thing that was sitting at her computer and it’s the quote that I’ve lived by for many years and that is: Find something that your passionate about and you’ll never work a day in your life. And I lived by that every single day. 

Jim Rembach:      I’ve think you’ve also made that ‘live on’ because your mom’s online store you’ve kept open and you’ve said she’s pass five years now—sorry about that—why did you do that? 

Karyn Furstman:     It was really important for me to carry on her legacy. She was so passionate about art and glass, an art glass and she had a personal collection but she had a website that after she was not able to have her physical gallery anymore. She kept an online presence and she would bring people into her home and she would connect people. She would bring artist to people’s houses to be able to showcase that. And it’s one of the things that is really important about. Number one: keeping the legacy alive around her passion and how glass bring so many things into people’s imaginations. But it also connecting people with artist and that’s really what I will do. If somebody wants to see a piece of glass that’s on the website I will still be able to connect the artist with those individual wanting something of beauty. And that’s really she was about color and beauty. 

Jim Rembach:     Now, there’s no doubt with being a female in an industry or in a role where you have to—you have to do more than just sell the idea of being more customer centric sometimes you just have to be downright strong and forceful about it, and I’m sure you’ve had a lot of humps and challenges to get over, is there one that sticks out to you that we can learn from?

Karyn Furstman:     I would say that it is really around to your point about being relentless but positive relentless. What I’ve really try to do is when I had a situation where somebody is not [inaudible 6:53] let’s say at the executive level or the C suite level, based on their role or based on maybe some previous concerns that they’ve had I really spend some time, not just working with them once on one, but having them sharing the accountabilities. So, making it real for them to be able to, whether it be assigning a specific type of thing for them to be able to do owning a moment of truth as an example, so that they became part of the thing that we we’re trying to change. Because I find that sometimes executives absolutely want to talk the talk but oftentimes it’s really hard for them to know what to do to actually walk the walk. And so, providing some accountabilities for them. And what I saw as a result was more impassioned leaders around the customer experience. 

 Jim Rembach:     That’s a very good point. When I went through university or college, I actually double majored in finance and real estate, and I’m used to say, ‘I didn’t go down that path.’ When I graduated it was another recession, however, with the real estate teaching and learning I really got a better understanding of what they call in real estate as pride of ownership, so in order for you to ride down the street you could probably stop in front of the house as a rental and pick it out because that ownership just isn’t there. So, I think what you’re saying is that you’re giving these guys, ladies an opportunity to take some ownership and then therefore it will actually brought out their intrinsic passion or drive.

Karyn Furstman:     Exactly. Because it helps them understand it more. What I found in my years of transforming and leading change in organizations is that when people don’t know what they need to do it’s hard for them to—they may say they embrace it—but until they experience it themselves. I also find very simply sometimes executives will have their own situation, a poor customer experience happened to them and that helps motivate them as well. 

 

Jim Rembach: So in other words, you want to push them into having a bad experience. 

 

Karyn Furstman:     Not really, but sometimes they just doing it and it becomes their ** commission.

 

Jim Rembach:   That’s good point. So, if you were to say from the experiences that you had what piece of advice would you give to our listeners?

 

Karyn Furstman:     From an advice perspective, what I would say is: Don’t take yourself too seriously and be authentic.  This is work that is very exciting but it can also be—sometimes two steps forward three steps backwards. And again back to that tenacity I think sometime in business we take ourselves too seriously and we’re people—back to my comment about building relationships and if you can relate to people on a human level and be able to have fun, enjoy what you’re doing and the ride that you’re on together, oftentimes that takes you to a greater place. I think we are so focus on business so much and we have to bake our numbers and that’s absolutely important. But it’s the how you do things and engage and inspire the people that you’re working with or your siblings or your parents or you children to be able to have some fun. 

 

Jim Rembach:    If you’re to say, have fun, what is something that you are really focusing on right now that’s giving you that fun?

 

Karyn Furstman:     It’s a great question. I would say that—back to fun and passion is, what I said before that I am taking over the home of the CXPA. I believe that my work in Customer Experience is something that was meant for me to do. As you said earlier, I grew up with two parents who were in business for many years. I really have this customer focus while I’ve held many jobs throughout my career, marketing, branding, product, P&L bringing this all together has just been a very much inspiring way for me to move my life forward and to help other people. Through the CXPA and taking on this leadership position it really allows me to help connect people who are all facing the same challenges, the same opportunities to be able to move that forward. I think that it is a great way for me to give back my passion. 

 

Jim Rembach:     Well, the Fast Leader legion wishes you the very best. Okay, now Karyn it’s time for the—Hump Day Hoedown. The Hump Day Hoedown is the part of our show where I ask you several questions fast and your job is to give us quick responses that are robust. So, Karyn are you ready to hoedown?

 

Karyn Furstman:     I sure am.  

 

Jim Rembach:     What do you think is holding you back from being an even better leader today?

 

Karyn Furstman:     I would say that it’s my time management. And not having enough hours in the day but being able to look at myself and make better use of my time so I can spend more time on value added activities.

 

Jim Rembach:     I have the same issue that’s for sure. What’s the best leadership advice you have ever received?

Karyn Furstman:     To be authentic. Don’t be something you’re not and don’t be a fake but be ‘You’. 

 

Jim Rembach:     Can you share one of your personal habits that you strongly believe contributes to your leadership life or life success?

 

Karyn Furstman:     I would say that it is my ability to connect people and have a common greater good with being able to give back and whether it’s giving back to each other or helping to get back to the community, it’s taking myself out of my self  and being able to help other people

 

Jim Rembach:     Thanks for sharing that. What one book would you recommend to our Fast Leader legion, I’m sure you have several good ones, but is there one that stands out? 

 

Karyn Furstman:     You know, it’s just the recent one that I picked up at the airport on a business trip recently and it really has had a profound impact and it’s called, 10% Happier, and the author who is a correspondent on ABC Good Morning America, it talks a lot about how do you get just that—10% more happy and he has some really interesting ways both in your personal and your business life to achieve that. 

 

Jim Rembach:     We all definitely need to get more happy. We’re going to make a link to that off of our show notes page which you’re going to find at fastleader.net/Karyn Furstman. Okay Karyn, here’s the last question on our Hump Day Hoedown: Imagine tomorrow you’re going to be 25 years old again and you get to take one skill or piece of knowledge back with you and you’ve got to choose what it is, what would you take back with you? And why?

 

Karyn Furstman:     Two that are related and it would be about not worrying and live in the present. And I think in my career as I’ve wanted or as we move forward in our life, it’s always about the one thing something else or the wanting to be at that next phase. This phase and this day is all that we have so being present brings out that in other people as well. 

 

Jim Rembach:      That sounds like some of the teachings that we get from that happiness part is that sometimes if we pursue too much we don’t find that happening. Thank you for sharing that with us. Can you tell us how our Fast Leader legion can get in touch with you?

 

Karyn Furstman:     Absolutely. Karyn.Furstman@gmail.com , Twitter is customers first. 

 

Jim Rembach:      Karyn Furstman we thank you for sharing and helping us get over the hump. Woot Woot!    

 

Thank you for joining me on the Fast Leader show today. For recaps, links from every show, special offers and access to download and subscribe, if you haven’t already, head on over the fastleader.net so we can help you move onward and upward faster.

END OF AUDIO