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105: Charles Vogl: I would cry at night from exhaustion and stress

Home/Podcasts/105: Charles Vogl: I would cry at night from exhaustion and stress

105: Charles Vogl: I would cry at night from exhaustion and stress

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Charles Vogl Show Notes

Charles Vogl served in the US Peace Corps in Northern Zambia. In a place very foreign to him than what he knew in Southern California. Charles lived in a mud hut with a grass roof and a mud floor. And he learned a cherished lesson of how the bravery of others can change people’s lives.

Charles was born and raised in Orange County, California with a younger brother and sister. They spent a lot of time in Honolulu, Hawaii visiting his mother’s family.

A commitment to making a difference has always been a crucial part of Charles’ life. In his early 20s, he volunteered full time at a homeless shelter in Santa Ana, California, before entering the United States Peace Corps and relocating to northern Zambia. There, he witnessed inspirational community in the face of extreme poverty, as those with very little shared with those who had even less.

Charles then moved to New York City to become a filmmaker, producing documentaries including the 2006 documentary film, “New Year Baby,” which chronicled the lives of Cambodian genocide survivors becoming Americans and won numerous honors including Amnesty International’s prestigious “Movies That Matter” award. At the same time, he also volunteered as a secret labor organizer, working to empower abused workers in the restaurant industry.

Charles received his B.S. from the Annenberg School at the University of Southern California and a Master of Divinity at Yale University. A regular guest lecturer at several Yale departments, his first book The Art of Community: Seven Principles for Belonging was recently published by Berrett-Koehler. Building on the concept that community and belonging can be developed through time-tested ideas and rituals, The Art of Community is a guide to creating and fostering meaningful communities that benefit individuals and humanity as a whole.

An author and executive consultant, Charles Vogl helps leaders in technology, finance, media, government, and social good organizations become more effective in creating meaningful change. Using principles drawn from more than 3000 years of community and spiritual tradition, he teaches others how to inspire powerful connections in critical relationships, in order to produce the kind of change that impacts generations.

Charles includes surviving a plane crash, a spitting cobra attack, and acute malaria (all in one year) among his life-changing experiences.

Charles currently lives in Oakland, California, with his wife Socheata.

Tweetable Quotes and Mentions

Listen to @charlesvogl to get over the hump on the @FastLeaderShow Click to Tweet

“Personal networks decreased by two-thirds in the last two generations.” -Charles Vogl Click to Tweet

“A community is people together that care about the welfare of one another.” -Charles Vogl Click to Tweet 

“I’m not convinced the thousand people in your social network care about your welfare.” -Charles Vogl Click to Tweet 

“Who are your 3am friends that you can call and they’ll take action?” -Charles Vogl Click to Tweet 

“Who are the people in your life who know that you’re their 3am friend?” -Charles Vogl Click to Tweet 

“When we’re vulnerable is often when we most need help.” -Charles Vogl Click to Tweet 

“When people are vulnerable with us we’re most inspired to offer support.” -Charles Vogl Click to Tweet 

“It’s hard to support institutions that are not sharing your values.” -Charles Vogl Click to Tweet 

“There are ancient concepts that we can use to build relationships.” -Charles Vogl Click to Tweet 

“Typically we come together in communities because of shared values.” -Charles Vogl Click to Tweet 

“The authentic brands are messaging around values.” -Charles Vogl Click to Tweet 

“Just saying a group is a community doesn’t make it so.” -Charles Vogl Click to Tweet 

“To know who is inside your community you have to have some boundaries.” -Charles Vogl Click to Tweet 

“I don’t really care about the values on your website.” -Charles Vogl Click to Tweet 

“The stories that people tell help to reveal their real values.” -Charles Vogl Click to Tweet 

“In healthy communities they’re providing every member a way to grow.” -Charles Vogl Click to Tweet 

“It’s the relationships with the people I know that really matter.” -Charles Vogl Click to Tweet 

“Every conversation matters even if it doesn’t look like it’s changing the world while it happens.” -Charles Vogl Click to Tweet 

“Success in the marketplace involves creating a place where people know they belong.” -Charles Vogl Click to Tweet 

“Americans are seemingly desperate to connect more.” -Charles Vogl Click to Tweet 

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Hump to Get Over

Charles Vogl served in the US Peace Corps in Northern Zambia. In a place very foreign to him than what he knew in Southern California. Charles lived in a mud hut with a grass roof and a mud floor. And he learned a cherished lesson of how the bravery of others can change people’s lives.

Advice for others

Put yourself where the action is happening. Show up where I need to be.

Holding him back from being an even better leader

I’m afraid of reaching out to people that are uninterested in me, making phone calls that people don’t want, of sharing myself in a way that people record me and have evidence of my silliness for years to come. And when I finally get over that I’m not that big a deal and that what I’m out to do is bigger than my ego I’ll definitely be more effective.

Best Leadership Advice Received

To put my body where the action is happening. Emails don’t count. Phone calls don’t count. Letters don’t count. To actually show up where I need to be.

Secret to Success

I remind myself throughout the day to not strive. If my vision is bold enough and my actions are consistent enough success as I’ve defined it will come.

Best tools that helps in Business or Life

Acknowledging the people around me that make a profound difference for me – support me and hold me up. And making sure I’m communicating how important they are to me in my life.

Recommended Reading

The Art of Community: Seven Principles for Belonging

The Trusted Advisor

Contacting Charles

Website: http://www.charlesvogl.com/

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/charlesvogl

Twitter: https://twitter.com/charlesvogl

Resources and Show Mentions

54 Emotional Intelligence (EQ) Competencies List: Emotional Intelligence has proven to be the right kind of intelligence to have if you want to move onward and upward faster. Get your free list today.


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By | 2017-01-25T06:27:15+00:00 January 25th, 2017|Podcasts|0 Comments

About the Author:

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Your Fast Leader Show host is Jim Rembach. Jim is a panel expert with the Customer Experience Professionals Association (CXPA) and spent many years in contact center operations and leverages this to help others. He is a certified Emotional Intelligence (EQ) practitioner, Certified Employee Retention Specialist, Certified Better Place to Work Expert, and frequently quoted industry expert.